home
RSS
November 11th, 2010
12:06 PM ET

What do we need to know about Medicare open enrollment?

As a feature of CNNhealth.com, our team of expert doctors will answer readers' questions. Here's a question for Dr. Gupta.

From Mary, Walnut Creek, California

"What should my husband and I know about open enrollment for Medicare?"

Answer:

Mary, thank you for your question. As you know, open enrollment begins November 15 for Medicare, the government program that currently provides health insurance to more than 38 million Americans, mainly adults ages 65 and older.  With the passing of the health care reform legislation, Medicare officials say there are more benefits and protections available to current and new enrollees.  Here are the top six highlights.

FULL POST


The triathlon journey
November 10th, 2010
04:47 PM ET

The triathlon journey

I was on a plane about a year ago getting ready to take off, when I got a call from the director of our unit at CNN. She is a triathlete, and in very good shape. “Hey, Sanjay! I have a great idea. You should do the New York Triathlon with me, and we can pick six viewers around the country to do it with us,” she said. At this point, the flight attendant came around and politely asked me to turn off my phone. “Roni, uh. Yeah sure. Sounds great,” was my reply. And, that is how I found myself signed up for my first-ever triathlon.

Truth is, I never dreamed that I could do this. With a busy schedule at the hospital, three children and constant travel around the world, I immediately worried that I wouldn’t be able to train properly or adhere to the diet necessary to be a triathlete.

When July came around, and we were just days from the race, I reflected on the past several months. I realized my whole approach to fitness had changed. As busy as life is, I somehow found time to break a sweat every single day.

FULL POST


October 29th, 2010
11:31 AM ET

Carrier

By Dr. Sanjay Gupta
CNN Chief Medical Correspondent

The tragic story of 22-year-old Saint Helene and her 15-month old daughter Cherie began like many here in Haiti. About two weeks ago, Saint Helene bought a bus ticket to Artibonite, a city about an hour north of Port Au Prince. Visiting with friends there last week, they had likely heard about the cholera outbreak that was unfolding in front of them. The good news: When Saint Helene and Cherie headed back to Port-au-Prince a few days later, they felt perfectly fine. Asymptomatic, as we say in the medical world. What Saint Helene or Cherie could not have known at that time is they were likely carrying the cholera bacteria back to the nation’s capital.

What happened next is not entirely clear. Saint Helene told us she was walking in Port-au-Prince, when she became suddenly ill. Within a couple hours, she was terribly dehydrated from diarrhea, and began to vomit. A good Samaritan brought mother and her young child to the closest hospital, where Saint Helene was taken to a back, somewhat isolated area and began treatment for cholera. She had an IV placed, and was given salts to replace the lost electrolytes. All of this happened within a few hours, relatively speedy, especially given the logistical challenges of Haiti.

FULL POST


October 28th, 2010
03:21 PM ET

How serious is selective IgA deficiency?

As a feature of CNNhealth.com, our team of expert doctors will answer readers' questions. Here's a question for Dr. Gupta.

From Indu, Waukesha, Wisconsin

"My 3-year-old daughter has been diagnosed with selective IgA deficiency. I am really worried. Can you please tell me what is this? What are her risk factors and will she live a normal life? Since three months she has had recurrent sinusitis infections and her blood test showed this deficiency ( IgA =6), No one in our family has this and both my husband and I are quite healthy. What are her options, treatment and any latest information/research in this field?"

FULL POST


October 28th, 2010
11:35 AM ET

Blindsided in the Third World

[cnn-video url=http://www.cnn.com/video/#/video/world/2010/10/28/dnt.gupta.haiti.cholera.aid.cnn]

By Sanjay Gupta
CNN Chief Medical Correspondent

I visited one of the largest warehouses in Port-au-Prince yesterday. It is a large structure behind a big blue gate and a handful of security guards. I went to get a better understanding of how lifesaving supplies are distributed in the middle of a cholera outbreak. Outside, workers from aid organizations were also waiting to take supplies to patients in St. Marks, the epicenter of the outbreak.

It quickly became clear that it was going to be a long day. One of the workers told me she had been waiting for several hours to pick up the supplies despite the fact that she had all the necessary paperwork and authorizations. No one was available to help her. After sitting there frustrated nearly the whole day, she eventually left empty-handed, telling me this wasn’t at all unusual. “Typical Third World red tape,” she added.

FULL POST


Gupta: Chemicals around us – we must know more
October 26th, 2010
06:33 AM ET

Gupta: Chemicals around us – we must know more

By Dr. Sanjay Gupta
CNN Chief Medical Correspondent

This morning, I will be testifying before the U.S. Senate Committee on Environment & Public Works. When I received the call to do this, truthfully, I was a little nervous. The topic is “Risks of toxic chemicals to children’s health,” something I have been interested in for a long time, and moreso after having three kids of my own. In fact, for the last year, I investigated the interplay between toxic chemicals and human health for a pair of documentaries on CNN.

I learned more than a series of text books could’ve taught me. I spent time with citizens in Mossville, Louisiana, arguably one of the most toxic cities in America. For countless hours, I spoke to government officials and private sector expert scientists both on and off camera. And, I looked carefully at the research about the toxics we live with everyday. The most eye-opening part was how much we don’t know.

FULL POST


October 7th, 2010
01:45 PM ET

Will eating carrots help my eyes?

As a feature of CNNhealth.com, our team of expert doctors answer readers' questions. Here's a question for Dr. Gupta.

From Anna Beth in Dayton, Ohio

“Are carrots actually good for your eyes or is that just a “mom’s tale?”

FULL POST


September 30th, 2010
01:16 PM ET

What might cause tongue pain?

As a feature of CNNhealth.com, our team of expert doctors answer readers' questions. Here's a question for Dr. Gupta.

From Anna, Washington, D.C.

“Is it possible to sprain/strain your tongue? I get shooting pains in my tongue. What can I take to stop the pain?"

FULL POST


September 29th, 2010
04:54 PM ET

Michael J. Fox on Parkinson's and life

By Dr. Sanjay Gupta
CNN Chief Medical Correspondent

When I went to Michael J. Fox’s neighborhood this morning, I had no idea what time we would start our interview. “He has to time his medications,” I was told. “When his medications kick in, he will be ready.” As far as I could tell, Fox’s medications kicked in right away, and for the next 90 minutes, we talked about everything.

Fox spoke about the hard shoes he has to wear first thing in the morning, because his feet and legs are so stiff. He humorously added that he just puts his toothbrush in his mouth, and lets the movement of his head do the rest of the work. As a neurosurgeon, it was fascinating to hear Michael describe his own brain surgery with such great clarity and his fears about doing it again. “Well, it is brain surgery…"  he said with flourish.

There is a lot we don’t know about Parkinson’s disease. For starters, no one is sure what causes it. One’s genetics likely loads the gun, and something in the environment pulls the trigger. But what? It might surprise you to know four people on the set of Fox’s first television series, "Leo and Me," developed early onset Parkinson’s disease. A statistical anomaly, or a clue? Michael, and his foundation’s scientists aren’t sure. Michael pauses when I ask him about it, he shrugs his shoulders and says, “I am not as concerned about a few people. I am focused on everyone who has the disease.”

FULL POST


September 23rd, 2010
08:00 AM ET

What are normal symptoms after Transient Global Amnesia?

As a feature of CNNhealth.com, our team of expert doctors will answer readers' questions. Here's a question for Dr. Gupta.

From Lynn Lemmon, Dunedin, Florida

"My husband recently had his second episode of Transient Global Amnesia. All neuro tests are normal, as expected. However, he had ringing in the ears and dizziness for two to three months leading up to this episode and continuing after it. He also has a persistent headache just above the eyes since this incident. Are all of these things related? If so, what can be done about them?"

FULL POST


« newer posts    older posts »
Advertisement
About this blog

Get a behind-the-scenes look at the latest stories from CNN Chief Medical Correspondent, Dr. Sanjay Gupta, Senior Medical Correspondent Elizabeth Cohen and the CNN Medical Unit producers. They'll share news and views on health and medical trends - info that will help you take better care of yourself and the people you love.

Advertisement
Advertisement