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Do ask, do tell about intimate partner violence
May 7th, 2012
05:01 PM ET

Do ask, do tell about intimate partner violence

Editor's note: Dr. Sharon Horesh Bergquist is an assistant professor of medicine at Emory University School of Medicine in Atlanta, Georgia. As a practicing internal medicine physician, she encounters patients who are dealing with intimate partner violence, which can have serious health effects.

As a physician, I look to evidence-based guidelines to drive my medical decisions. Yet often there isn't a consensus - such as whether doctors should ask patients if their partner is being violent with them in any way (physically, sexually or emotionally).

The most recent recommendation issued by the United States Preventive Services Task Force in 2004 did not find sufficient evidence to support screening women for partner violence.  However, many professional organizations such as the American Congress of Obstetricians and Gynecologists, the American Medical Association and the Institute of Medicine support such screening.  

A study published on Monday in the journal Annals of Internal Medicine  comprehensively reviews the studies published since 2003 on the effectiveness of screening and interventions in reducing partner violence and its related health outcomes.
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Seriously? Doctors say they're underpaid
May 1st, 2012
10:55 AM ET

Seriously? Doctors say they're underpaid

Anthony Youn, M.D., is a plastic surgeon in metro Detroit. He is the author of “In Stitches,” a humorous memoir about growing up Asian American and becoming a doctor.

Full disclosure: I have no complaints about how much I make.

But many other physicians are not as satisfied - a recent study by Medscape revealed that 49% of doctors believe they're not fairly compensated. Of primary care physicians, this percentage increases to 54%.

It’s no myth that doctors are some of the highest paid professionals in the country. So why are they complaining?

It’s likely because of situations like Dr. Peterson’s.
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Why doctors shouldn't treat family members
January 9th, 2012
09:55 AM ET

Why doctors shouldn't treat family members

Anthony Youn, M.D., is a plastic surgeon in Detroit. He is the author of “In Stitches,” a humorous memoir about growing up Asian American and becoming a doctor.

Imagine you are a highly skilled surgeon. Then imagine that your grandson gets into a terrible car accident and suffers serious internal injuries.

The injuries are so severe that he needs a physician to operate on him immediately. Even though a qualified surgeon is ready, willing and able to perform his surgery, do you ask that surgeon to step aside and operate on your grandson yourself?

This was a dilemma that a colleague of mine encountered several years ago. At this moment of crisis, he faced the choice that physicians face all the time: Do you give medical care to your family members or leave it up to other doctors?

Not wanting to put Joey’s life into another surgeon’s hands, Dr. Sanders decided to operate on his grandson himself.
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Should doctors practice what they preach?
July 26th, 2011
07:10 AM ET

Should doctors practice what they preach?

Anthony Youn, M.D., is a plastic surgeon in Metro Detroit. He is the author of “In Stitches,” a humorous memoir about growing up Asian American and becoming a doctor.

What do you call a chain-smoking, morbidly obese, soda addict who just graduated medical school?

Yep. Doctor.

How would you feel if he were your doctor? Would you listen to him if he asked you to adopt a healthier lifestyle?
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Limiting student doctors' hours cuts both ways
June 14th, 2011
08:27 AM ET

Limiting student doctors' hours cuts both ways

There are growing concerns that limits on the long hours medical interns and residents can work could affect their readiness to practice medicine.

Four years ago, the union that protects interns and residents, called the Committee of Interns and Residents, was successful in decreasing their hours per shift from 30 to 16. Some doctors think that limit may be curtailing the new doctors' education.

“More often than not, I get, ‘Well I have to go, my time’s up,’ said ER doctor Celina Barba. “Definitely the attitude is 'my need to leave is more important than my need to learn.'”
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That's Dr. Watson, to you
May 23rd, 2011
04:00 PM ET

That's Dr. Watson, to you

Instead of man versus machine (like the Jeopardy showdown), the makers of Watson, the supercomputer, are toying with how machine can help man - at the hospital.

After defeating his human rivals champions Ken Jennings and  Brad Rutter on Jeopardy earlier this year , Watson, the trivia-question answering supercomputer, is on a new task.

Watson, which has been in development for years, has the processing power of 2,800 "powerful computers," as a major advancement in machines' efforts to understand human language.   It juggles dozens of lines of reasoning at once and tries to arrive at a smart answer.

Medical staff at Columbia University Medical Center and the University of Maryland School of Medicine are seeing if Watson could interact with health workers to help with the diagnosis and treatment of patients.   FULL POST


Wanted: Fewer science nerds, more 'culturally competent' doctors
April 28th, 2011
11:52 AM ET

Wanted: Fewer science nerds, more 'culturally competent' doctors

The test that all medical school applicants take  could place greater emphasis on behavioral and social sciences, adding a new component and lengthening the test to seven hours, if proposed changes are accepted.

Members of the committee that proposed the changes to the Medical College Admission Test (MCAT) say that this could help better identify applicants who have a greater understanding of behavioral and social factors that contribute to health problems.

“We want to broaden the knowledge base that students have about those factors that influence health,” said committee chair Dr. Steven Gabbe, who is also CEO of the Ohio State University Medical Center. “Yes, you must have solid base in science, but you have to understand the challenges.  You have to be culturally competent to understand socio-economic challenges in different groups face dealing with health problems.” FULL POST


Battle over 'Baby Joseph' intensifies
March 2nd, 2011
05:29 PM ET

Battle over 'Baby Joseph' intensifies

The hospital treating Joseph Maraachli – a 13 month old Canadian boy with a progressively deteriorating neurological condition whose parents are fighting to have him transferred to the U.S. for care- has launched a public information campaign to address what hospital officials  say are "outrageous and defamatory" allegations.

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Doctors and Facebook: Is there a privacy risk?
December 16th, 2010
02:32 PM ET

Doctors and Facebook: Is there a privacy risk?

Doctors with a Facebook profile could be jeopardizing their relationship with patients if they don't correctly use the website's privacy settings, according to a study in the Journal of Medical Ethics.

Study authors surveyed 200 residents and fellows at the Rouen University Hospital, France, in October 2009.  The overwhelming majority had a profile on the online social media website Facebook and almost all displayed their real names, birth dates, a personal photograph and their current university.

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On Christmas, the lonely seek refuge in hospitals
December 16th, 2010
12:00 PM ET

On Christmas, the lonely seek refuge in hospitals

Two days before Christmas, Ishani Kar-Purkayastha a junior doctor at an English hospital, prepares to dig through a stack of patient papers. She remembers the night:

The pre-Christmas emptying of the hospital is well underway. People want to be at home.

Instead, the young doctor is interrupted by a woman. “Doris,” who complains of aching in her shoulder.  Doris has been at the hospital for three weeks. FULL POST


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Get a behind-the-scenes look at the latest stories from CNN Chief Medical Correspondent, Dr. Sanjay Gupta, Senior Medical Correspondent Elizabeth Cohen and the CNN Medical Unit producers. They'll share news and views on health and medical trends - info that will help you take better care of yourself and the people you love.

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