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Snoring in kids could mean other problems, doctors say
Snoring in small children may be linked to behavioral problems such as hyperactivity, researchers say.
August 13th, 2012
03:28 PM ET

Snoring in kids could mean other problems, doctors say

Everyone snores, even children. But if your little ones snore often and loudly, doctors say they may face other problems, such as hyperactivity, inattention and depression.

Researchers at the Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center studied 249 children, surveying their mothers about their youngsters’ sleeping habits. The study found children who snored loudly at least twice a week at the ages of 2 and 3 had more behavioral problems than children who didn’t snore, or who snored at 2 or 3 but not at both ages.

"The strongest predictors of persistent snoring were lower socioeconomic status and the absence or shorter duration of breast-feeding," says Dr. Dean Beebe, director of the hospital's neuropsychology program. "This would suggest that doctors routinely screen for and track snoring, especially in children from poorer families, and refer loudly-snoring children for follow-up care.

"Failing to screen, or taking a 'wait and see' approach on snoring, could make preschool behavior problems worse," he says. "The findings also support the encouragement and facilitation of infant breast-feeding."

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July 30th, 2012
01:09 PM ET

Your thoughts: Plastic surgery for bullied kids

Would you allow your kids to change their appearance because they are being bullied? Does giving these children plastic surgery send the wrong message - or the right one? Watch Dr. Sanjay Gupta's special report and share your thoughts below!


Phone therapy helps with depression, study says
June 5th, 2012
04:01 PM ET

Phone therapy helps with depression, study says

Receiving psychotherapy over the phone is showing promise for people with depression, according to new research. A study published Tuesday found patients counseled over the phone were less likely to drop out of treatment compared to those who got face-to face counseling.  Researchers also found people who talked to their therapist on the phone got better at the same rate as those who spent time on the counselor's couch.

"This research gives us a pretty clear indication that providing therapy via technology can be a useful strategy," says Lynn Bufka, assistant executive director, practice research and policy at the American Psychological Association.

Researchers at Northwestern University in Chicago conducted the study which was the first large trial comparing face-to-face therapy with telephone therapy. Their findings were published in the Journal of the American Medical Association.
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Speed, Ecstasy tied to teen depression
April 19th, 2012
07:35 AM ET

Speed, Ecstasy tied to teen depression

The short-lived high teenagers get from using amphetamines or the club drug MDMA - better known as Ecstasy - could lead to longer-lasting depression later on, a new study suggests.

Researchers in Canada interviewed 3,880 teenagers from low-income neighborhoods in Québec. Compared to their peers who used neither drug, teens who reported taking MDMA or amphetamines at least once in the tenth grade had 70% and 60% higher odds, respectively, of experiencing depression symptoms in the eleventh grade.

Using both drugs nearly doubled the odds of depression.
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Researcher: Blood test for early-onset depression promising
April 17th, 2012
02:44 PM ET

Researcher: Blood test for early-onset depression promising

How does a parent know if their child or teen is experiencing normal adolescent sadness or moodiness or - a more serious form of depression? The answer may one day lie in a simple blood test, if the results of a new early study are confirmed in larger populations.

The results are published in Translational Psychiatry.

Early-onset major depressive disorder is a mental illness that affects people under 25. While about 2 to 4% of cases are diagnosed before adolescence, the numbers skyrocket to 10-25% with adolescence, explains lead researcher Eva Redei, professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences at Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine.
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Depression and baby sleep: Vicious cycle?
April 17th, 2012
12:01 AM ET

Depression and baby sleep: Vicious cycle?

There's a fascinating new parenting study out that caught our eye at The Chart.  It involves the sleep habits of babies and toddlers.

Research suggests if mom is depressed, she's more likely to wake her baby up in the middle of the night, even if the baby is fine.  Experts say if that happens occasionally, it's not a problem.

But if it happens often, it can lead to developmental issues.

In the study, published in the journal Child Development, researchers at Pennsylvania State University observed 45 families over the course of a week.  The children ranged in age from 1 month to 2 years.  Moms were asked questions about a variety of issues from how they were doing emotionally to the baby's sleep patterns.

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April 10th, 2012
08:29 AM ET

Mike Wallace's public battle with depression

Since his death at age 93 Saturday, much has been written about hard-edged ex-"60 Minutes" reporter Mike Wallace's epic verbal battles with world leaders, swindlers and alleged crime bosses.

But in 2005, Wallace made news of his own when he acknowledged his longtime war with depression - a fight that nearly caused him to take his own life.

"I came perilously close to committing suicide," Wallace wrote in his memoir "Between You and Me."
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Five ways to fight depression in the bedroom
March 22nd, 2012
08:54 AM ET

Five ways to fight depression in the bedroom

Ian Kerner, a sexuality counselor and New York Times best-selling author, blogs about sex weekly on The Chart. Read more from him on his website, GoodInBed.

We live in a culture in which use of SSRIs (selective serotonin re-uptake inhibitors), talk therapy, and mental health days have become nearly as common as gym memberships and multi-purpose vitamins.

In fact, the National Institute of Mental Health reports that more than 20 million people in the U.S. experience depression. Unfortunately, mood swings aren’t the only symptom of depression - it can also have a negative effect on your romantic relationships, especially when it comes to sex.

"One symptom of depression is anhedonia, a lack of pleasure in things that were once enjoyable,” sex therapist Dr. Stephanie Buehler writes in her timely new book, “Sex, Love, and Mental Illness.”

“Sex is often one of those activities in which a person loses interest. Add to that fatigue, lethargy, and a tendency to want to be alone and there are plenty of reasons for depressed persons and their partners to experience a decline in their sex life."
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Filed under: Depression • Relationships • Sex

Avoiding dementia similar to heart disease – lifestyle changes important
March 13th, 2012
08:01 AM ET

Avoiding dementia similar to heart disease – lifestyle changes important

Late-life dementia has a lot in common with heart disease – and many of the same causes, according to an article published Tuesday in Nature Reviews Neurology.

Like heart disease, the cognitive impairment that accompanies aging is usually the result of a combination of lifestyle and other factors, the article says. Diabetes, obesity, untreated hypertension, sedentary lifestyle and stress are all linked to both heart disease and dementia.

Other factors linked to dementia: untreated obstructive sleep apnea, clinical depression, bipolar disorder, vitamin B12 deficiency, post traumatic stress disorder, head trauma, brain injury caused by a lack of oxygen, and the ApoE, or Alzheimer’s, gene.

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A 'visual diary' of depression
February 6th, 2012
11:56 AM ET

A 'visual diary' of depression

When Marvi Lacar¹s father died in 2008, she experienced feelings she wasn¹t aware existed. Her conflicting emotions –­ those of resentment, guilt, love, yearning to forgive and yearning to not forgive - spiraled her into acute clinical depression.

Today, the CNN Photo Blog features her photographs of depression.

See her visual diary


Filed under: Depression • Psychology

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About this blog

Get a behind-the-scenes look at the latest stories from CNN Chief Medical Correspondent, Dr. Sanjay Gupta, Senior Medical Correspondent Elizabeth Cohen and the CNN Medical Unit producers. They'll share news and views on health and medical trends - info that will help you take better care of yourself and the people you love.

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