home
RSS
ADHD brains may have 'faulty brakes'
February 14th, 2011
05:37 PM ET

ADHD brains may have 'faulty brakes'

Much news about attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder has focused on learning and attention, but here's another important part of this condition: Impairment in motor function.

Two new studies in the journal Neurology explore how brain functions relating to motor control may explain certain ADHD symptoms. They support previous research showing that kids with ADHD have motor control problems and offer new potential targets for treatment in the brain's inhibitory systems.

“If we can understand the systems that are involved, because there’s probably not just one, then we can identify groups of kids that have these symptoms, quantitatively and reliably, and use that information to understand who’s at the highest risk of a bad adult outcome,” said Dr. Donald Gilbert, study co-author and director of the Movement Disorder Clinic and Tourette's Syndrome Clinic at Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center.

FULL POST


February 14th, 2011
12:01 AM ET

Pediatricians, parents warned on energy drink dangers

They claim to give you that extra boost, but recent studies have shown that energy drinks containing large amounts of caffeine and other stimulants, can actually cause major health problems in children, teens and young adults. In fact, according to the American Association of Poison Control Centers, of the 5,448 U.S. caffeine overdoses reported in 2007, 46% occurred in those younger than 19 years. Now a new report in the journal of Pediatrics warns parents, and doctors that these drinks could be especially dangerous to children with ADHD, diabetes, sleep issues and eating disorders.

Tips for managing diabetes

Doctors from the University of Miami School of Medicine say that  although caffeine can improve attention spans, it also increases blood pressure and disrupts sleep patterns in young people. And scientists have found the attention span of kids who consumed these drinks on a daily basis eventually decreased. So did their heart rates over the long run, while their blood pressure numbers increased, which could put unnecessary pressure on the heart. Researchers note that could be dangerous for children who are on other medications

FULL POST


Does ADHD come from foods?
February 3rd, 2011
06:30 PM ET

Does ADHD come from foods?

It's still a mystery, and parents and scientists alike are looking for answers about why some 5 million children in the United States have attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, a condition marked by impulsive behavior and a lack of focus. There have been genetic links shown, and plenty of accusations of misdiagnosis, but now the attention turns to a different explanation: Diet.

A team of scientists from the Netherlands set out to demonstrate in a study, published in the Lancet, that there could be a connection between what children eat and their ADHD-like behaviors. They go as far as to say that the standard of care for ADHD should include a restricted diet.

But the researchers did not pinpoint any specific foods that appear to induce ADHD symptoms, and their ideas must be explored further in other studies before being considered definitive, experts say.

FULL POST


Get Some Sleep: ADHD, sleep disorders often entwined
January 4th, 2011
11:25 AM ET

Get Some Sleep: ADHD, sleep disorders often entwined

The young mother looked tired and sad, and when she started to speak, her voice quivered with frustration:  “I don’t know what we’re doing here.  Jimmy sleeps fine.  It’s the other 14 hours of the day that’s the problem.”

The reason she was there in my sleep center was because her 6-year-old son, Jimmy, was being evaluated for ADHD (attention deficit hyperactivity disorder).  Her astute pediatrician was up on the latest research that shows an association between sleep disorders in school-age children and behavior disorders such as ADHD.  The sleep disorder that has been studied the most in this regard is obstructive sleep apnea, or OSA. FULL POST

Post by:
Filed under: ADHD • Children's Health • Sleep

December 28th, 2010
09:56 AM ET

On antidepressants, why the jaw pain?

Every weekday, a CNNHealth expert doctor answers a viewer question. On Tuesdays, it's Dr. Charles Raison, an associate professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences at Emory University, and an expert in the mind-body connection for health.

Question asked by Janet A. of Albuquerque, New Mexico:

I have been on antidepressants for many years and have taken almost every kind of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors. One side effect I developed is temporomandibular joint disease symptoms and tinnitus. I also recently have been diagnosed with attention-deficit (hyperactivity) disorder. All of these medications aggravate my TMJ. The only medication that has helped me in the past is Valium. I am now taking clonazepam with less effectiveness. How common are TMJ symptoms and tinnitus with both of these medications? Any suggestions on how can I get relief for my jaw pain and ringing in my ears?
FULL POST


December 21st, 2010
10:22 AM ET

Do homeopathic treatments for ADHD work?

Every weekday, a CNNHealth expert doctor answers a viewer question. On Tuesdays, it's Dr. Charles Raison, an associate professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences at Emory University, and an expert in the mind-body connection for health.

Question asked by Suzie

Our 8-year-old daughter was diagnosed with ADHD at age 6. We have tried several medications, stimulants and nonstimulants, and have not gotten good results. We are now looking at homeopathic treatment for our daughter, but the question is: Does it really work? FULL POST


December 14th, 2010
08:19 AM ET

Do I really have ADHD?

Every weekday, a CNNHealth expert doctor answers a viewer question. On Tuesdays, it's Dr. Charles Raison, an associate professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences at Emory University, and an expert in the mind-body connection for health.

Question asked by Thomas of Dallas, Texas:

I have just been diagnosed with ADD/ADHD, but I am questioning the diagnosis since I feel that I don't exhibit most of the symptoms. I mean, I do get distracted while I am working on my research or studying, but I feel everyone gets distracted just as I do. How is normal distraction different from ADHD?

FULL POST


ADHD kids benefit from coaching
November 12th, 2010
05:19 PM ET

ADHD kids benefit from coaching

Tell students with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder to show up for an appointment to learn how to manage a calendar, and here's what's going to happen: They won't show up, they'll forget their calendar, or they won't follow through, says David Parker, a researcher at Wayne State University.

Instead, Parker and colleagues argue, college students with ADHD benefit from a more inclusive, personal model of learning how to manage their time and organize their lives.

FULL POST


CDC: Childhood ADHD rate rises 22 percent
November 10th, 2010
04:00 PM ET

CDC: Childhood ADHD rate rises 22 percent

Nearly one in 10 children in the U.S. has been diagnosed with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), and the rate appears to be growing, according to a report released Wednesday by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).

The percentage of children ages 4 to 17 who have ever been diagnosed with ADHD rose from 7.8 percent to 9.5 percent between 2003 and 2007—a 22 percent increase, the CDC found. The report was based on the results of the National Survey of Children's Health, a nationwide telephone survey of parents.

FULL POST

Post by:
Filed under: ADHD

October 6th, 2010
05:26 PM ET

Study: Pregnant women can drink.. a little

For years doctors have warned pregnant women not to drink, because studies had shown that consuming alcohol while carrying a child, could affect the baby's development after birth.

Now new research suggests that light drinking, such as a glass or two of wine a week, does not harm a young child.

Investigators found that youngsters of mothers who drank one or two 8 oz. glasses of alcohol a week during their pregnancies had no problems with their behavioral or intellectual development by the time they turned five. FULL POST


« newer posts    older posts »
Advertisement
About this blog

Get a behind-the-scenes look at the latest stories from CNN Chief Medical Correspondent, Dr. Sanjay Gupta, Senior Medical Correspondent Elizabeth Cohen and the CNN Medical Unit producers. They'll share news and views on health and medical trends - info that will help you take better care of yourself and the people you love.

Advertisement
Advertisement