home
RSS
BPA may reduce sperm count
October 28th, 2010
03:01 AM ET

BPA may reduce sperm count



Exposure to bisphenol-A (BPA), a controversial chemical found in hard, clear plastics, is thought to increase the risk of birth defects, early puberty, obesity, brain damage, and some forms of cancer.

Add another potential problem to the list: A new study of Chinese factory workers suggests that very high levels of BPA exposure may decrease sperm count and contribute to other sperm-related problems in men.

The findings aren't surprising. BPA—which can be found in some baby bottles and water bottles, as well the linings of food and beverage cans—is known to be a so-called endocrine disruptor that functions "like a weak estrogen" and blocks male sex hormones (including testosterone), says the lead author of the study, De-Kun Li, M.D., a reproductive and perinatal epidemiologist at Kaiser Permanente's division of research, in Oakland, California.

Health.com: 4 things that mess with your hormones
But the study is notable because it's one of the first in humans to link BPA with reproductive problems. Until very recently, most of the evidence implicating BPA in health problems has come from animal or laboratory studies. (BPA has been associated with reduced sperm count in mice and rats, for instance.)

"Human studies have been the missing link,"  Li says.

In the new study, which appears in the journal Fertility and Sterility, Li and his colleagues collected urine and semen samples from 218 factory workers, some of whom worked in facilities that make BPA or epoxy resin and were therefore regularly exposed to very high levels of the chemical.

Compared with men whose urine was BPA-free, those who had detectable levels of BPA were four times more likely to have a below-average sperm count, three times more likely to have fewer "live" sperm than average, and two times more likely to have below-average sperm quality (motility).

In previous studies conducted in the same population,  Li's team found a similar association between BPA exposure and erectile dysfunction, among other sexual problems.

Health.com: Study links BPA in plastics to erectile dysfunction

“If BPA has such an impact on male sexual function, we have to wonder what else it has an impact on,"  Li says.

The findings don't prove cause and effect, however, and it's not clear how relevant they are for men in the U.S. who aren't exposed to unusually high levels of BPA. Although the researchers did find a connection between BPA levels and sperm problems in men who were exposed to BPA only in the general environment (rather than the workplace), it's possible that the study population differs from the U.S. population in key ways.

Still, the study seems likely to serve as ammunition for advocates and public health officials who favor restrictions on BPA.

Health.com: 12 ways to remove (and avoid) toxics in your home and body

Earlier this month, Canada became the first nation to officially declare BPA a toxic substance. Although the U.S. government hasn't taken similar action, several states have banned the use of the chemical in baby products (or have considered it) and many manufacturers have voluntarily phased out BPA from their products.


soundoff (810 Responses)
  1. Murray Brunell

    Excellent write-up. I definitely appreciate this site. Keep it up!

    https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCfi-XkHiXXlwXJqzmmvEvZg

    June 6, 2022 at 05:59 | Report abuse | Reply
  2. ktovn cẩm nang du lịch

    Together with the whole thing which appears to be developing inside this specific subject matter, many of your perspectives happen to be fairly radical. Even so, I am sorry, but I can not give credence to your entire theory, all be it refreshing none the less. It would seem to everyone that your opinions are not totally rationalized and in fact you are generally your self not really completely certain of your point. In any event I did appreciate reading through it.

    https://www.elephone.hk/static/redirect?url=http3A2F2Fktocovuvietnam.vn2F

    July 22, 2022 at 06:58 | Report abuse | Reply
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17

Post a comment


 

CNN welcomes a lively and courteous discussion as long as you follow the Rules of Conduct set forth in our Terms of Service. Comments are not pre-screened before they post. You agree that anything you post may be used, along with your name and profile picture, in accordance with our Privacy Policy and the license you have granted pursuant to our Terms of Service.

Advertisement
About this blog

Get a behind-the-scenes look at the latest stories from CNN Chief Medical Correspondent, Dr. Sanjay Gupta, Senior Medical Correspondent Elizabeth Cohen and the CNN Medical Unit producers. They'll share news and views on health and medical trends - info that will help you take better care of yourself and the people you love.