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London pollution could affect Olympic athletes’ performance
Almost a quarter of a million people will be arriving at London's Heathrow airport as athletes and fans arrive for the Games.
July 23rd, 2012
07:00 AM ET

London pollution could affect Olympic athletes’ performance

Less than a week from the opening ceremonies, allergists are warning that some Olympic athletes may suffer breathing problems due to air pollution in London.

The amount of nitrogen dioxide in London is comparable to the level of nitrogen dioxide in Beijing before Beijing banned half of the cars in preparation for the Games, and London has done little to control traffic, says Dr. William Silvers, an allergy specialist and a member of the American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology (AAAAI).

Demanding workouts in the polluted air could spell trouble particularly for those athletes that already have conditions such as asthma or exercise-induced bronchoconstriction (EIB), a narrowing of the airways that makes it hard to move air out of the lungs, according to AAAAI.
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Treatment guidelines for Gender Identity Disorder in development
July 5th, 2012
10:32 AM ET

Treatment guidelines for Gender Identity Disorder in development

In recent years, stories about transgender people have been front page news. The transformation of Chaz Bono, son of singers Sonny and Cher, from female to male is perhaps the most well known.

"In puberty, I felt like my body was betraying me," Bono said in an interview.  Now the nation’s top psychiatrists are beginning to talk about developing treatment guidelines for transgender people.

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Filed under: Psychology • Sex

Global H1N1 death toll may be 15 times higher than previously reported
An Algerian doctor prepares a vaccine dose against the H1N1 flu in 2009 in a hospital in Algiers.
June 25th, 2012
07:09 PM ET

Global H1N1 death toll may be 15 times higher than previously reported

The actual number of deaths from the 2009 H1N1 pandemic might have been more than 15 times higher than previously thought, according to a study released on Monday.

When the new H1N1 virus, often referred to as swine flu, spread around the world three years ago, 18,500 deaths were reported to the World Health Organization in the first 16 months of the pandemic.  Based on this new study, published online in The Lancet Infectious Diseases, researchers estimate 284,400 people actually died in the first year the virus was circulating around the world.

According to a model developed by the study authors, the actual number of deaths linked to the H1N1 flu virus could range anywhere from 151,700 to 575,400.   Lead study author Dr. Fatimah Dawood says she and her colleagues used three types of data to come up with their estimates:

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About this blog

Get a behind-the-scenes look at the latest stories from CNN Chief Medical Correspondent, Dr. Sanjay Gupta, Senior Medical Correspondent Elizabeth Cohen and the CNN Medical Unit producers. They'll share news and views on health and medical trends - info that will help you take better care of yourself and the people you love.

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