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More evidence links calcium supplements to heart attacks
May 23rd, 2012
06:30 PM ET

More evidence links calcium supplements to heart attacks

Calcium supplements, widely taken by older people to prevent bone fractures, may be doing more harm than good, a large new study suggests.

Researchers tracked nearly 25,000 European adults for 11 years, and found that people who reported regularly taking calcium supplements were more than twice as likely to have a heart attack as those who didn't use any supplements.

Only the use of calcium supplements, and not overall calcium intake, was associated with an increased risk of heart attack. In fact, people who consumed higher amounts of calcium from foods, such as milk and other dairy, tended to have a lower risk of heart attacks than people who consumed less.
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October 9th, 2010
11:30 AM ET

Jenny Craig clients in study shed 20 pounds

Women who stick to the Jenny Craig weight-loss program lose between three and four times as much weight as women who diet on their own, according to a new study published Saturday in the Journal of the American Medical Association.

The study was funded by the Jenny Craig company, which provides counseling services and prepackaged low-fat foods to dieters through a nationwide chain of retail centers, or via phone and mail.

Women who ate the prepared foods and checked in weekly with a trained Jenny Craig weight-loss counselor in person or by phone lost about 20 pounds after one year, on average.

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Filed under: Fitness • Nutrition • Weight loss

October 7th, 2010
03:35 PM ET

CDC: Achy joints on the rise in U.S.

More than one in five adults in the U.S. have arthritis or other joint-damaging conditions, and the ongoing obesity epidemic may be partly to blame, according to a report issued Thursday by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).

Roughly 50 million U.S. adults have some form of arthritis, the report estimates. That number includes people with osteoarthritis, which is typically caused by aging, as well as those with other, less common conditions such as rheumatoid arthritis, gout, lupus, and fibromyalgia. Health.com: 10 food tips for pain patients

The report was based on a national survey conducted between 2007 and 2009. Overall, 9.4 percent of adults said that arthritis prevented them from doing everyday activities. That’s up from 8.8 percent four years earlier – an increase that’s outpacing forecasts made by CDC researchers in 2006.

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Filed under: Arthritis • CDC • Health.com

October 1st, 2010
10:49 AM ET

CDC: Nearly 1 in 10 U.S. adults depressed

Nine percent of U.S. adults have at least some symptoms of depression, and people in certain states are more likely to be depressed than those in others, according to the results of a nationwide survey by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

Mississippi had the highest depression rate in the nation, with 14.8 percent of residents reporting two or more symptoms of the condition, such as feeling hopeless, taking little interest or pleasure in everyday activities, and having trouble concentrating. Health.com: How to recognize the symptoms of depression

Other states at the top of the list included West Virginia (14.3 percent), Alabama (13 percent), Oklahoma (11.3 percent), Tennessee (11 percent), and Louisiana (10.8 percent), according to the survey, which was conducted in 2006 and 2008.  See state map. FULL POST


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About this blog

Get a behind-the-scenes look at the latest stories from CNN Chief Medical Correspondent, Dr. Sanjay Gupta, Senior Medical Correspondent Elizabeth Cohen and the CNN Medical Unit producers. They'll share news and views on health and medical trends - info that will help you take better care of yourself and the people you love.

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