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Should your child get ear tubes?
July 1st, 2013
06:19 PM ET

Should your child get ear tubes?

Parents of young children may be all too familiar with the ear aches, ear infections, and middle ear fluid build-up that can plague their little ones.

For many of these children, ear tubes, known clinically as tympanostomy tubes, may be the best treatment. But until now, there has been no clinical guideline to advise doctors and parents on which children should - or should not - receive them.  A multidisciplinary panel associated with the American Academy of Otolaryngology – Head and Neck Surgery Foundation (also known as AAO-HNSF) has changed that, releasing new guidelines on Monday.

"You've got the number-one ambulatory surgery in kids, the number-one reason they are given anesthesia, and no national society has ever published evidence-based guidelines about the best way to do this," said Dr. Richard Rosenfeld, a professor and chairman of otolaryngology at SUNY Downstate Medical Center in Brooklyn, New York. FULL POST


October 14th, 2010
06:23 PM ET

Survey: More children using marijuana

More kids and teens are smoking marijuana at younger ages, according to data collected by the National Survey on Drug Use and Health. From 2008 to 2009, there was a 9 percent increase - to 7.3 percent of people age 12 or older - who currently use marijuana. During the same time period, the average age of first-time marijuana users decreased to 17 years old.

The human brain is still developing throughout the teen years and in to a person's 20s That's why the Office of Drug Control Policy says using marijuana at the age of 12 can lead to addiction, respiratory illness, weakened motor skills, and cognitive impairment not only while the child smokes but for years after a person quits.

FULL POST


September 15th, 2010
04:21 PM ET

Study shows teens receive sex ed

Most American teens are well-educated about sex, with 97 percent saying they had received some formal sex education before the age of 18.

The data are part of a new report from the National Survey of Family Growth (NSFG), part of the CDC's National Center for Health Statistics.

"We wanted to update the facts on how many teens are getting formal instruction on sex education and how frequently," says report author Joyce Abma, Ph.D, in a podcast released in conjunction with the report. Abma is a demographer with the National Center for Health Statistics.

FULL POST


September 13th, 2010
12:02 AM ET

Study: Men with low initial PSA levels less likely to develop prostate cancer

Men with low PSA levels from a baseline blood test were less likely to develop prostate cancer compared to men whose baseline PSA levels were high, according to a new study.

The simple test may be a strong predictor of who will benefit from future screening and treatment for prostate cancer, according to the study published Monday in the journal Cancer.

More than 85,000 men, ages 55 to 74, with no previous prostate cancer history were the subjects of the study. The authors found that in order to save one life, they needed to investigate almost  25,000 men with low PSA levels but only 133 men with high ones. Similarly, they needed to treat 724 men who had low PSA levels to save one life but only 60 men whose levels were higher.

FULL POST


September 9th, 2010
04:02 PM ET

A decade short on fruits and vegetables

New statistics from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention confirms what you may already know– Americans do not eat enough fruits and vegetables.  But you may be surprised by this:  The daily rate of consumption for both has not improved in the last decade, according to the figures.

In 2009, more than 32 percent of adults in the United States ate fruit at least twice a day. That figure has declined since 2000, when 34 percent of the population was meeting the recommended daily intake. Those numbers pale in comparison to the government's targeted objective of 75 percent of the adult population.

FULL POST


September 8th, 2010
01:18 PM ET

FDA to consider OK of genetically engineered salmon

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration is expected later this month to decide whether to approve genetically engineered salmon for human consumption. If OK'd it would be the first genetically modified animal permitted by the food safety agency.

A company, AquAdvantage Salmon, has injected growth hormones into Atlantic salmon that enable the fish to reach maturity in half the  normal growth time,  16 to 18 months rather than 30 months.

The FDA  in its analysis released last week, wrote: “We therefore conclude the food from AquAdvantage Salmon… is as safe as food from conventional Atlantic salmon and that there is a reasonable certainty of no harm from the consumption of food from this animal.” FULL POST


September 6th, 2010
07:09 PM ET

Animal-based protein diets increase mortality rate

Not all proteins are equal when it comes to the health of dieters eating low-carbohydrate, high-protein diets.

Animal-based proteins and fats are associated with increased mortality rates, including increased cardiovascular mortality and increased cancer mortality, a new study published in the Annals of Internal Medicine concludes. But low-carbohydrate, high-protein diets composed mostly of plant-based proteins and fats were associated with lower mortality rates overall and lower cardiovascular mortality rates.

FULL POST


September 3rd, 2010
03:40 PM ET

Latest hand transplant patient shows progress

The third person in the United States to receive a double hand transplant can already move his fingers.

Last month, in a first-of-its-kind procedure, doctors at the Jewish Hospital Hand Care Center were able to salvage most of the nerves and tendons in Richard Edwards' hands. They left his original hands intact and connected nerves to restore their function.

Now, Edwards can make a full fist with one hand and a half-fist with the other. His doctors say his progress is a good sign and that Edwards is six months ahead of where they suspected he would be.

FULL POST


September 1st, 2010
02:00 PM ET

Differences found in individuals' immune systems

Humans’ immune systems are not as different from person to person as previously thought, according to scientists at the Fred Hutchison Cancer Research Center reported Wednesday. The findings, the researchers say, could help pave the way for new drugs or immunotherapies to treat disease and infection in a host of patients, including organ transplant and skin graft recipients.

The crux of the research is the realization that of the tens of millions of T cell receptors that make up what’s known as the adaptive immune system, a small fraction of them are the same. It's called the variable region of our cells and it may not sound like a big deal but its practical applications are impressive.

FULL POST


August 17th, 2010
02:24 PM ET

Eggs recalled over salmonella concerns

Wright County Egg of Galt, Iowa, is voluntarily recalling some of its eggs out of concern they may be tainted with salmonella bacteria.

After an uptick in salmonella infections, the Centers for Disease Control and the Food and Drug Administration, traced the source and determined it was most likely eggs from Wright County Egg.  The company says it is working to determine how the shell eggs are being contaminated.

Wright County Egg packages shell egg products under the following brand names: Lucerne, Albertson, Mountain Dairy, Ralph's, Boomsma's, Sunshine, Hillandale, Trafficanda, Farm Fresh, Shoreland, Lund, Dutch Farms and Kemps. The brands are distributed nationwide. The recall affects eggs packed in several different sized cartons, from a half dozen to 18-eggs.

FULL POST


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About this blog

Get a behind-the-scenes look at the latest stories from CNN Chief Medical Correspondent, Dr. Sanjay Gupta, Senior Medical Correspondent Elizabeth Cohen and the CNN Medical Unit producers. They'll share news and views on health and medical trends - info that will help you take better care of yourself and the people you love.

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