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More kids injured playing football, soccer
Injuries from ball sports showed a slight uptick of 5.5%, with football and soccer leading the way.
March 19th, 2013
01:01 AM ET

More kids injured playing football, soccer

Football injuries among children have increased 22% in the last decade, according to a new study.  Overall, however, sports injuries among children have decreased.

The findings surprised Dr. Shital Parikh, associate professor of orthopaedic surgery at Cincinnati Children’s Hospital and the study's lead author. Parikh will present his research at the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons’ annual meeting on Thursday.

When he started analyzing the numbers from the National Electronic Injury Surveillance System, Parikh expected to find a big increase in kids’ injuries based on what he and his colleagues have seen in their practice.

Instead he found that the overall number of activity injuries for kids aged 5 to 14 decreased 11.3%. The researchers looked at data from bicycle, basketball, football, roller sports, playground equipment, baseball/softball, soccer and trampoline injuries.
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Doctors make recommendations for safe cheerleading
October 22nd, 2012
10:01 AM ET

Doctors make recommendations for safe cheerleading

Back in the 1800s, when cheerleaders first appeared on a field,  their main goal was to get fans to root for their team, either by yelling chants, clapping or using pom-poms.

But that's all changed. Now being a cheerleader is more demanding because many of these young men and women perform gymnastic stunts that are not only breathtaking but also dangerous.

Because of these dangers, the American Academy of Pediatrics has published a new policy statement, entitled “Cheerleading Injuries: Epidemiology and Recommendations for Prevention,” with a list of recommendations on how to keep cheerleaders trauma-free.

These days, cheerleaders are a lot like acrobats. And there's been some debate over whether cheerleading is a sport. Some cheerleading organizations say it does not meet criteria necessary to be considered a sport. But the AAP says it should be treated like one, because like other athletes, cheerleaders can sustain serious injuries.

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Get a behind-the-scenes look at the latest stories from CNN Chief Medical Correspondent, Dr. Sanjay Gupta, Senior Medical Correspondent Elizabeth Cohen and the CNN Medical Unit producers. They'll share news and views on health and medical trends - info that will help you take better care of yourself and the people you love.

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