home
RSS
War of words over looming EPA dioxin study
January 27th, 2012
11:04 AM ET

War of words over looming EPA dioxin study

With the EPA's deadline only days away, a war of words has erupted over whether the agency should go ahead with a dioxin study decades in the making.

Vietnam veterans, environmental advocates and women’s groups were among the more than 2,000 individuals and organizations signing a letter Thursday urging EPA Administrator Lisa Jackson to publish the dioxin risk assessment.

“We are writing to strongly urge you to finalize the EPA’s study on dioxin, which has been delayed for over 25 years,” the one-page letter says.

FULL POST


November 7th, 2011
06:14 PM ET

Medical views: When does human life begin?

Mississippi residents vote Tuesday on a controversial ballot initiative that seeks to define a fertilized human egg as a person with full legal rights.

Anti-abortion advocates crafted Initiative 26, which defines personhood as "every human being from the moment of fertilization, cloning or the functional equivalent thereof."

Amendment would declare fertilized egg a person

If passed, the law could affect a woman's ability to get the morning-after pill or birth control pills that destroy fertilized eggs, and it could make in vitro fertilization treatments more difficult because it could become illegal to dispose of unused fertilized eggs. FULL POST


October 18th, 2011
06:45 AM ET

No proven IVF-cancer link, doctors say

E! News anchor Giuliana Rancic's efforts to conceive have been the main theme of her reality show "Giuliana and Bill." On Monday she revealed she has to postpone her next round of IVF after her new fertility expert insisted she get screened for breast cancer, even though she is only 36 years old.

Rancic said, on the Today Show,  that her doctor told her "I don't care if you're 26, 36. I won't get you pregnant if there is a small risk you have cancer. If you get pregnant it can accelerate the cancer. The hormones accelerate the cancer."

Her doctor may have been taking the step as a precaution.

"There’s no evidence for a link between breast cancer and infertility treatment," says Dr. Eric Widra, who chairs the Society for Assisted Reproductive Technology. A 2005 study looked at a possibility but the study authors concluded a link to breast or ovarian cancer had not been found.

FULL POST


Maria Menounos' plans for her embryos
October 6th, 2011
12:48 PM ET

Maria Menounos' plans for her embryos

Last week, entertainment celebrity Maria Menounos made news when she announced she plans to freeze her eggs for future use.

But in an interview with CNN, Menounos clarified that she's actually freezing embryos, not eggs. Fertility doctors will make the embryos by fertilizing her eggs with her boyfriend's sperm in a lab. The resulting embryos will then be banked until the couple wants to use them to start a pregnancy.

The difference between freezing eggs and freezing embryos is significant. Women who freeze their eggs usually do it because they don't have a partner and they're concerned their eggs will be too old by the time they find one. Menounos, on the other hand, has a boyfriend, writer/producer/director Keven Undergaro.
FULL POST


What the Yuck: Are celebs more fertile than the rest of us?
Kelly Preston became pregnant at 47, although she hasn't said whether or not she used IVF.
July 15th, 2011
10:06 AM ET

What the Yuck: Are celebs more fertile than the rest of us?

Too embarrassed to ask your doctor about sex, body quirks, or the latest celeb health fad? In a regular feature and a new book, "What the Yuck?!," Health magazine medical editor Dr. Roshini Raj tackles your most personal and provocative questions. Send 'em to Dr. Raj at whattheyuck@health.com.

Are celebs more fertile than the rest of us? How come so many are able to have babies in their mid- and late 40s?

You've stumbled onto one of Hollywood's "Dirty Little Secrets": donor eggs and in vitro fertilization (IVF). While being famous can get you far in life, it doesn't extend the warranty on your ovaries. It just gives that A-lister greater access to cutting-edge fertility treatments and doctors that the rest of us may not know about or be able to afford.
FULL POST


Relax! The Zsa Zsa-baby thing won't happen
April 14th, 2011
04:56 PM ET

Relax! The Zsa Zsa-baby thing won't happen

You probably saw the headlines Thursday about 94-year-old actress Zsa Zsa Gabor becoming a mother. Sounds like a miracle of modern science, right?

Wrong. There are a bunch of significant problems with the whole scenario that make it, in the end, just another sensational Hollywood tale that won't actually happen.

FULL POST


Mouse study may offer hope for infertile men
March 24th, 2011
04:54 PM ET

Mouse study may offer hope for infertile men

After decades of failure, researchers have managed to create fertile sperm in a laboratory, raising hopes for infertile men.

“I think for everyone in the field, especially for the potential patients, it’s quite exciting,” says Martin Dym, a professor of biochemistry at Georgetown University School of Medicine.

FULL POST


Fewer teens are giving birth; C-section rate at an all time high
December 21st, 2010
11:52 AM ET

Fewer teens are giving birth; C-section rate at an all time high

Fewer teen girls had babies in 2009 than in previous years, according to statistics released today by the Centers for Disease Control. The report also finds that fewer American women overall are giving birth.

The report, compiled by the CDC's National Center for Health Statistics, is based on birth records collected in all 50 states, the District of Columbia and U.S. territories. Among the highlights:

FULL POST


C-sections up, overall births down in 2008
December 20th, 2010
12:01 AM ET

C-sections up, overall births down in 2008

4,251,095 babies were born in the United States in 2008, according to the latest statistics provided by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, which is about 2% fewer than in the previous record-setting year. But about a third or 32.3% of these newborns came into this world by way of cesarean sections – a 2% increase – which marks the twelfth consecutive year that the number of c-sections has gone up.
Although the rate has gone up more than 50% compared with 1996, the increased number of women delivering their babies this way has been slowing, says Joyce Martin, one of the CDC’s epidemiologists who crunched the numbers for a report published Monday in the journal Pediatrics.

Each year the American Academy of Pediatrics publishes an “annual summary of vital statistics” that compiles a variety of data. For example, in 2008: FULL POST


Different touch urged for young cancer patients
November 19th, 2010
09:36 AM ET

Different touch urged for young cancer patients

Doctors need to recognize that young cancer patients are different from older individuals. To help, the American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO)  launched a new program on Wednesday designed to help educate physicians on how to better treat  this patient population. 

The program, called Focus Under Forty, is a joing effort between LIVESTRONG and ASCO.  It teaches oncologists how to improve treating cancer patients between the ages of 15 and 39.

FULL POST


« newer posts    older posts »
Advertisement
About this blog

Get a behind-the-scenes look at the latest stories from CNN Chief Medical Correspondent, Dr. Sanjay Gupta, Senior Medical Correspondent Elizabeth Cohen and the CNN Medical Unit producers. They'll share news and views on health and medical trends - info that will help you take better care of yourself and the people you love.

Advertisement
Advertisement