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June 13th, 2014
12:01 AM ET

5 studies you may have missed

Here's a roundup of five medical studies published this week that might give you new insights into your health, mind and body. Remember, correlation is not causation – so if a study finds a connection between two things, it doesn't mean that one causes the other.

Keep your phone out of your pocket – your sperm will thank you
Journal: Environmental International

Since guys don’t usually carry handbags, they tend to keep mobile phones in their pants pockets. A recent study from the University of Exeter suggests this may not be a great idea.

That cell phone could actually have a negative effect on your sperm quality.
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Filed under: Aging • Brain • Cell Phones • Conditions • Dental health • Diet and Fitness • Fertility • Heart • Living Well • Men's Health • Mental Health

5 things we learned about kids' health this week
May 6th, 2013
05:40 PM ET

5 things we learned about kids' health this week

From cyber-bullying that could threaten your teen’s self-esteem, to dangerous distractions that could cause you to crash while driving your kids, here’s a look at five important studies about the health of children being presented this week at a large pediatric conference in Washington.

1. Moms and dads are distracted while driving kids

Researchers asked 600 parents what distractions they encountered while driving their most precious cargo: Their children. Among the interruptions: Talking on the phone, texting, surfing the Internet, checking a navigation system, and changing a CD or DVD.

Almost 90% of parents admitted to doing at least one of these technology-based distractions.
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Teens who 'sext' more likely to be sexually active
Teens who engage in "sexting" are more likely to demonstrate risky sexual behavior, a study shows.
September 17th, 2012
12:07 AM ET

Teens who 'sext' more likely to be sexually active

If your adolescent is sexting, they may be already sexually active and engaging in risky behavior, a new study suggests.

Researchers are trying to better understand if young people are at greater risk for HIV or other sexually transmitted diseases because they are sending sexually explicit photos or text messages via cell phones.

"Sexting" is not an alternative to "real world" sexual behavior among adolescents, according to a new study published Monday in the journal Pediatrics.

"The same teens who are engaging in digital sex risk taking through sexting are also the same teens that are engaging in sex risk with their bodies in terms of being sexually active and not using condoms," said lead study author Eric Rice, an assistant professor at the University of Southern California's School of Social Work in Los Angeles.
FULL POST


TXTING @ THE WHEEL BAD 4 U?
April 29th, 2012
12:01 PM ET

TXTING @ THE WHEEL BAD 4 U?

News flash: Texting while driving can have serious, catastrophic consequences.

All sarcasm aside, you will most likely have heard this message by now and seen the PSA's meant to convince you that this is a bad idea.  You've heard that many states ban texting while driving and hopefully are heeding the warnings.   But some of the youngest drivers still don't realize that it is a problem.

Some teens, however, do and are taking matters into their own hands.

Determined to educate their peers about on the dangers of texting while driving, a group of student leaders in Oklahoma started Generation tXt.

They focus on those recently behind the wheel for the first time.

FULL POST


More muddy water on cell phone use, kids' brain cancer risk
July 27th, 2011
05:20 PM ET

More muddy water on cell phone use, kids' brain cancer risk

A new study touts findings that kids who use cell phones are at no greater risk of brain cancer than non-users. But before you heave a sigh of relief and allow your kids unrestricted cell phone use, take a harder look at what the study, published in the Journal of the National Cancer Institute, does and does not reveal.

Using data from a multi-center study - called CEFALO - of children and teens who have brain tumors, the study by Swiss researchers concludes that "regular users of mobile phones were not statistically significantly more likely to have been diagnosed with brain tumors compared to nonusers." The study also concludes that kids who started to use mobile phones at least five years ago were not at higher risk for brain cancer compared with kids who had never regularly used mobile phones.

FULL POST


Filed under: Cancer • Cell Phones • Children's Health

Coffee, pickled veggies also 'possibly' cause cancer
June 2nd, 2011
12:37 PM ET

Coffee, pickled veggies also 'possibly' cause cancer

As you continue to weigh the risks and benefits of using your cell phone, in light of the recent World Health Organization announcement that the phones may lead to cancer, consider how scared you are of pickled vegetables, gasoline and magenta dyes.

These are just some of the substances also lumped in the same group of "possible carcinogens," formally known as "group 2B carcinogens" on the WHO's International Agency for Research on Cancer's list of known, likely and maybe-likely suspects.

FULL POST


Cell phones and cancer: Should you be worried?
June 1st, 2011
09:58 AM ET

Cell phones and cancer: Should you be worried?

By now you may have heard that cell phones are "possibly carcinogenic to humans." That's according to the World Health Organization and something some scientists have suspected for a while.  But now that it's coming from the WHO, those who have questioned the safety of cell phones have significant international support.

But why "possibly"? What is that supposed to mean? The latest judgment from the WHO sounds a little wishy-washy, and that's because of the inconclusive nature of the scientific studies on this subject.

FULL POST


May 20th, 2011
08:08 AM ET

Human Factor: After the tumor, raising the cell phone issue

In the Human Factor, we profile survivors who have overcome the odds. Confronting a life obstacle – injury, illness or other hardship –- they tapped their inner strength and found resilience they didn’t know they possessed.   This week Chief Medical Correspondent Dr. Sanjay Gupta introduces us to real estate agent Alan Marks. He's a man  whose determination helped him to overcome his deficits from brain cancer and become one of the leading advocates for cell phone safety. Here is his story in his own words.

In the summer of 2008, I was diagnosed with a malignant brain tumor after suffering a grand mal seizure in the middle of the night.  I had a craniotomy and a golf ball sized tumor was removed.

Of course I was angry but I also needed to know why.  Why did this happen to me?  My medical records were sent to doctors and scientists around the world and they said they believed my brain tumor was directly attributable to my long -term extensive use of my cellular phone.  I then heard stories of many brain tumor patients who were in the same situation as me, many much younger and many no longer alive.

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Filed under: Brain • Cell Phones • Human Factor

May 20th, 2011
08:00 AM ET

Gupta: Cell phones, brain tumors and a wired earpiece

Learn more about cell phones and the current research into whether they could cause brain tumors, “Sanjay Gupta, M.D.,” Saturday, 7:30 a.m. and 2:30 p.m. ET and Sunday at 7:30 a.m. ET.

By Dr. Sanjay Gupta, Chief Medical Correspondent

Just about every time I use a cell phone, I plug in my wired earpiece first. Having discussed the use of earpieces on several news shows, people expect to see me using one. If I am walking around the CNN studios, my colleagues often comment on it. In airports, people will stop me in the rare cases I forget to use the earpiece, and remind me about it. Perhaps, they are intrigued because I am a neurosurgeon who openly shows some concern about cell phones.

Truth is, it is a pretty easy thing to do – using an earpiece. Furthermore, my neck doesn’t hurt after being on the phone for a long conference call, and given that many of those calls take place in a car, an earpiece becomes a requirement. Still, though, I don’t want to dodge the obvious question: Do cell phones cause brain cancer? FULL POST


Do cell phones cause behavioral problems?
December 7th, 2010
12:01 AM ET

Do cell phones cause behavioral problems?

Evidence of harm from cell phones continues to emerge: First there was the possible cancer link, and now there's suggestion that those little hand-held devices may affect children's behavior.

Children who had exposure to cell phones both in the womb and after birth, up to age 7  had a higher likelihood of behavioral problems than those who had no exposure, researchers said in a new study in the Journal of Epidemiology & Community Health.

FULL POST


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About this blog

Get a behind-the-scenes look at the latest stories from CNN Chief Medical Correspondent, Dr. Sanjay Gupta, Senior Medical Correspondent Elizabeth Cohen and the CNN Medical Unit producers. They'll share news and views on health and medical trends - info that will help you take better care of yourself and the people you love.

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