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Pesticide exposure during pregnancy may increase autism risk
June 24th, 2014
02:36 PM ET

Pesticide exposure during pregnancy may increase autism risk

Scientists have long hypothesized that chemicals found in our environment play a role in causing autism. Research published this week in Environmental Health Perspectives supports that theory, finding children whose mothers are exposed to agricultural pesticides during pregnancy may be at increased risk for autism spectrum disorders, or ASD.

Researchers at the University of California, Davis, looked at the medical records of 970 participants. They found pregnant women who lived within a mile of an area treated with three different types of pesticides were at a two-thirds higher risk of having a child with ASD or developmental delays. These pesticide-treated areas included parks, golf courses, pastures and roadsides.

The study investigated the use of three classes of pesticides: organophosphates, which include the widely used insecticide chlorpyrifos, as well as pyrtheroids and carbamates.

The study authors also discovered that women exposed to pesticides during their second or third trimesters were even more likely to have a child born with developmental delays or autism.

Until further research determines whether pesticides inside the home pose similar risks, Janie Shelton, one of the study’s authors and a graduate student at UC Davis, advises pregnant woman to limit pesticide exposure as much as possible.

“I would suggest that women who are pregnant or in the process of becoming pregnant avoid using chemicals inside the home," Shelton said. "Make sure to read the labels and see if any of these chemicals are in the things they use."

The findings add to the mounting evidence linking autism and developmental delay to pesticide exposure during pregnancy.

“This is the third epidemiological study from California that has shown that prenatal pesticide exposure is associated with ASD,” said Alycia Halladay, senior director of environmental and clinical sciences for Autism Speaks. “It reinforces the advice of public health care experts and doctors to minimize exposure to these chemicals during pregnancy.”

The authors say further research is needed to determine whether a mother’s genes also contribute to the increased risk associated with environmental exposure to pesticides.

Another study published in Pediatrics this week found a link between race and autism spectrum disorders.

The researchers looked at more than 7,500 people and found that children of foreign-born black, Central and South American, Filipino and Vietnamese mothers were at higher risk of developing autism than children of white mothers born in the United States.

This doesn't necessarily mean that these races are more genetically prone to autism.

“It can be very scary for parents when they hear such high degree of association, but they should also keep in mind that this research is only showing some association and not cause,” William Sharp, director of the Marcus Autism Center and assistant professor at Emory University School of Medicine, wrote in an email. Sharp was not involved with either study.

“Not all pregnant women exposed to pesticides or all immigrants from Central (and) South America go on to have children with autism.”

And experts agree there are many other risk factors that could be at play in increasing the autism risk, such as maternal stress after relocating to the U.S., nutritional deficiencies and/or a lack of access to treatment and diagnosis.

“Both studies highlight the need to further enhance our understanding regarding the relationship between environmental events, fetal and early childhood development and autism,” Sharp wrote.

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Filed under: Autism • Conditions • Environment • Pregnancy

soundoff (90 Responses)
  1. mom

    Yes, mothers need to decrease exposure to pesticides (and all toxins) to help prevent autism. It does not just HAPPEN. Also, she needs a healthy gut. She needs to eat healthy food.

    June 24, 2014 at 17:45 | Report abuse | Reply
    • nonovyerbeezwax

      You're the same person who claimed to know what causes autism in other posts. Knock it off.

      June 24, 2014 at 17:52 | Report abuse |
    • fweioff

      "Toxins" is a meaningless buzz word and a red flag for ignorance.

      June 24, 2014 at 23:13 | Report abuse |
    • Gary

      The population in this study was so small as to be almost meaningless. It is of some interest, but only as it indicates a possible subject for much larger studies.

      June 25, 2014 at 01:00 | Report abuse |
    • worldcares

      Having a healthy gut and getting an actual diagnosis was costly, with insurance coverage, in the late 80s. I remember, my second son was six months old. I started having abnornal cravings for sweets, then I became very weak and started having esphageal constrictions. These symptoms were hideous. I was so weak. I went to many specialists who could not diagnosis me.
      I finally found one doctor, who took one look at my throat and said, "I'm going to take a blood test and send it to California." He knew exactly what was wrong with me.
      He. also, was the doctor, who observed my first born son,, age 2, in the waiting room. laughing and rolling on the floor.

      He knew exactly what was wrong with my son and started procedure for diagnosis of Autism.
      If it helps, for the record, I told the doctor , after marrying, I had regular yeast infections. I had never had them before.
      The Doctor told me, "Believe it or not, a person can be allergic to another person's chemistry,"

      June 25, 2014 at 04:58 | Report abuse |
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  2. Pete

    I'm not so sure about these results. It would seem to suggest that people living in the city would be much more protected from autism since pesticide use in rural areas is very prevalent. However, I seem to remember reading that urban areas have a higher rate of autism.

    June 24, 2014 at 20:33 | Report abuse | Reply
    • Concerned Citizen

      Actually, the use of pesticides in urban areas is extremely high, especially in multi-family/high-rise type dwellings that serve lower income families. Insecticides are one of the main pesticides used in such settings-a lot of pyrethroids and some carbamates and organophoshpates. Many property managers have services come monthly. I lived in one complex where the pesticide applicator came weekly-WEEKLY. I actually became ill and sensitized to pesticides from the chronic, "low-level" exposure.

      June 24, 2014 at 23:01 | Report abuse |
    • Keith

      Actually 80% of pesticide use is in urban areas, unregulated by home owners.

      June 24, 2014 at 23:10 | Report abuse |
    • Squeezebox

      The stuff they used in the 1960's would make your head spin. I was born in May, 1965 and my mother was an Orkin client.

      June 25, 2014 at 14:55 | Report abuse |
  3. InfinitusMax

    This is purely speculative BS.

    June 24, 2014 at 21:46 | Report abuse | Reply
    • Keith

      All science is speculative, but most of it is not BS

      June 24, 2014 at 23:12 | Report abuse |
    • tallulah131

      Why do you say that, max? Do you have some inside information that you aren't sharing?

      June 24, 2014 at 23:16 | Report abuse |
    • S

      And where did you get your PhD from Max? :)

      June 25, 2014 at 02:52 | Report abuse |
  4. Keith

    Monsanto is going to kill us all if they are not stopped.

    June 24, 2014 at 23:10 | Report abuse | Reply
    • Ruby

      Sure, but they will give us cheap and plentiful food so we can all die fat and happy.

      June 24, 2014 at 23:47 | Report abuse |
    • Keith

      There is that, but the food is not really so cheep. Too bad our government is not concerned with food safety or the health of their citizens. 22 other countries are and have banned Monsanto.

      June 25, 2014 at 01:23 | Report abuse |
    • dawshoss

      Actually, ironically given your post, increased use of GMOs like those produced by Monsanto would greatly decrease use of organophosphates, especially the insecticides. Instead of resorting to organophosphates such GM crops allow farmers to employ roundup and BT as alternatives.

      June 25, 2014 at 06:21 | Report abuse |
    • Keith

      If a plant makes it's own poison to kill insects it isn't good to eat. GMO crops have increased the use of herbicides by 570 million tons in the last 20 years.

      There are super weeds on over half the farms that grow roundup ready crops. Monsanto has applied for and received permission to start producing 2-4-D in order to have a herbicide that will kill the super weeds. 2-4-D is one of the carcinogenic ingredients that made up Agent Orange. Agent Orange has caused cancer in millions of Vietnam vets that were exposed to it.

      Monsanto has been banned in 22 countries.

      June 25, 2014 at 07:54 | Report abuse |
    • nonovyerbeezwax

      Back up your claims, Keith. Cite your sources. Show evidence that GMO crops are harmful. Go ahead.

      June 25, 2014 at 08:38 | Report abuse |
    • Keith

      How is the weather in St Louis this morning, or are you posting from Austin?

      June 25, 2014 at 10:21 | Report abuse |
    • nonovyerbeezwax

      I love it when someone claims that our government is not concerned with food safety. We almost certainly have more safety controls on food than nearly any other nation.

      Usually the same people who make these claims are the ones screaming to be permitted to sell raw milk.

      June 25, 2014 at 08:41 | Report abuse |
    • Keith

      You would be wrong on both counts, but I know your job is to try and discount what ever I say.

      Not only do we have fewer controls on our food, the FDA lets companies use known poisons and carcinogens in processed food.

      June 25, 2014 at 10:23 | Report abuse |
    • nonovyerbeezwax

      Oh, look. Keith has no sources he's not ashamed to cite, and anyone who questions his "facts" is automatically a "shill."

      Sorry, dearie, but if you can't prove it with something other than your opinion, it's not accurate.

      June 25, 2014 at 14:09 | Report abuse |
    • Keith

      I have plenty of sources for folks interested in the truth, I quit arguing with paid posters a long time ago.

      Google is your friend, Information is there for your education. Just put in the question "how many countries have banned Monsanto?" easy as pie, you will have the beginning of a learning experience.

      June 26, 2014 at 00:36 | Report abuse |
    • Russian Judge

      So, everything I find when I do that search will be factual? How stupid are you?

      You made the claim. The onus is on you to back it up. It's not my job to prove YOUR point.

      July 2, 2014 at 09:13 | Report abuse |
    • Keith

      I am not obligated to prove my point, I have given you the facts, do with them as you please.

      July 2, 2014 at 18:47 | Report abuse |
    • Keith

      Hey, you give up yet, or you want me to keep posting?

      A report by Jeremy Scahill in The Nation revealed that the largest mercenary army in the world, Blackwater (later called Xe Services and more recently “Academi“) clandestine intelligence services was sold to the multinational Monsanto. Blackwater was renamed in 2009 after becoming famous in the world with numerous reports of abuses in Iraq, including massacres of civilians. It remains the largest private contractor of the U.S. Department of State “security services,” that practices state terrorism by giving the government the opportunity to deny it.
      Many military and former CIA officers work for Blackwater or related companies created to divert attention from their bad reputation and make more profit selling their nefarious services-ranging from information and intelligence to infiltration, political lobbying and paramilitary training – for other governments, banks and multinational corporations. According to Scahill, business with multinationals, like Monsanto, Chevron, and financial giants such as Barclays and Deutsche Bank, are channeled through two companies owned by Erik Prince, owner of Blackwater: Total Intelligence Solutions and Terrorism Research Center. These officers and directors share Blackwater backgrounds.
      One of them, Cofer Black, known for his brutality as one of the directors of the CIA, was the one who made contact with Monsanto in 2008 as director of Total Intelligence, entering into the contract with the company to spy on and infiltrate organizations of animal rights activists, anti-GM and other dirty activities of the biotech giant.

      July 2, 2014 at 23:05 | Report abuse |
    • Russian Judge

      You are if you don't want to be dismissed as a complete and utter fraud, Keith. Oh, wait. Too late. You don't have a single fact to cite. You lose.

      July 2, 2014 at 20:43 | Report abuse |
    • Keith

      Here you go, more of the truth for you to deny. It isn't me that is the fraud, say hi to all my friends in St Louis.

      There are super weeds on half the farms in America that use those dangerous GMO products. From 1996 to 2011 the use of GMO seed caused the increased use of Herbicide by 527 million pounds. GMO products have never been proven safe. The FDA announced that it was the producer’s responsibility to insure the safety of the produce. Immediately after that announcement Monsanto sent out a statement saying that as a producer that their only responsibility was to produce as much viable seed as possible and sell as much as possible.

      July 2, 2014 at 21:46 | Report abuse |
    • Russian Judge

      THIS is what you call "evidence"? AHAHAHAHAHA! Thanks for playing, Keith!

      July 8, 2014 at 18:23 | Report abuse |
    • Keith

      People all over America contact me for information about Monsanto. No ignorant paid poster for Monsanto will ever intimidate me. I have provided all the evidence that thinking people require.

      I would think that 22 countries banning or restricting Monsanto's ability to do business would be enough proof for anyone to want to know more about how Monsanto is ruining Agriculture in America.

      At present there are super weeds on over half the farms that grow Monsanto crops. Monsanto has applied for and I am sure they will receive permission to produce 2-4-D one of the Carcinogenic elements used in Agent Orange.

      July 8, 2014 at 22:36 | Report abuse |
    • Russian Judge

      You can keep on repeating the same old nonsense, Keithie, dear. It won't make anyone believe you unless they're as stupid as you are.

      Prove that GMO crops are harmful to people. CIte the studies to back up your claims. Or be laughed at.

      July 8, 2014 at 22:48 | Report abuse |
    • Keith

      Prove that they are safe, cite the studies. There are none.

      There is evidence that they are harmful or they would not be illegal in so many countries. They have capable scientist all over the world, and they do not have ex-Monsanto officers running their FDA to cover for your guys

      July 8, 2014 at 23:30 | Report abuse |
    • Russian Judge

      You really are not terribly bright, are you?

      It's not MY job to prove YOUR claim. Either put up or shut up. Post citations and sources that prove that GMO foods are harmful.

      Really, claiming that because something is illegal elsewhere as proof of anything is so lame I would think you'd be mortified, but you're just not that smart.

      July 9, 2014 at 11:58 | Report abuse |
    • Keith

      You didn't 'bother posting any proof that they were safe either, because they do not exist. In fact Monsanto says the safety of their products is not their responsibility.

      You are not earning your money. Actually because something is illegal in other countries is proof that our Government does not care about the health of the American public. They like their campaign checks from Monsanto better.

      July 9, 2014 at 21:25 | Report abuse |
    • Russian Judge

      You never made the debate club, did you, dear? I'm not the one who has to prove anything. You are. You didn't. Case closed.

      July 9, 2014 at 22:10 | Report abuse |
    • Keith

      actually I won state in extemporaneous speaking in 1968. Every one reading these posts know who the loser is buster and it is you.

      No, I know the truth, Monsanto knows the truth, they are just hoping they can make a few more billions before they get shut down.

      July 9, 2014 at 23:05 | Report abuse |
    • Russian Judge

      Sweetie, if you have any citations and links to proof, post them. I'm sure you must, since you keep on bragging about it. Where are they? I can assure you that I'm not paid by Monsanto or anyone else. I simply don't believe conspiracy theorists and wackaloons like you without some proof. Produce it and show you're not just some nut-case.

      July 10, 2014 at 09:35 | Report abuse |
    • Keith

      I know you are posting for Monsanto because you did not respond to certain things I wrote. I have been talking to you guys for a couple of years and my business partners son in law watches the internet for several corporations and Monsanto is one of their customers too. . So I know your script.

      July 10, 2014 at 20:03 | Report abuse |
    • Russian Judge

      Not even close, you boob. I never worked for Monsanto or any other corporation. I'm retired. I don't have a thing to do with medicine, pharma, or science. I simply have an interest in the truth, and nothing you have posted is in any way evidence that GMO foods are harmful.

      If you can't make your case, stop trying to obfuscate and admit it. Post evidence, Keith. Not accusations. That's just lame.

      July 12, 2014 at 17:43 | Report abuse |
    • Keith

      You have not posted any facts, you have ignored my statements and questions. You are a Monsanto poster and a liar.

      July 13, 2014 at 01:50 | Report abuse |
    • Russian Judge

      Hilarious. You're the one with the case to prove, dear. You didn't. You couldn't.

      Thus you resort to attacking those who ask for proof.

      Lame.

      July 17, 2014 at 23:15 | Report abuse |
    • Keith

      .

      July 19, 2014 at 10:56 | Report abuse |
  5. fweioff

    The multibillion-dolllar organic food industry is the biggest scam in the history of food production, preying on the ignorance of irrational suckers who can't understand basic scientific concepts.

    June 24, 2014 at 23:13 | Report abuse | Reply
    • Hoodedoo

      Enlighten us to your basic scientific concepts.

      June 24, 2014 at 23:56 | Report abuse |
    • bobb

      It turns out that fweioff is the largest pesticide producer in the country.

      June 25, 2014 at 00:26 | Report abuse |
    • dawshoss

      True unfortunately, "organic" doesn't have to mean environmental, or even safe, just unaltered from nature. In that sense it's simply become another kind of "kosher" more religious than practical in meaning. Natural doesn't mean safe and environmental, nature doesn't care about you, and usually, if anything...nature is trying to kill you :P

      What we need are labels that reflect what most of us really care about, safety and the effect the practices on the environment.

      June 25, 2014 at 06:30 | Report abuse |
  6. jdoe

    Americans rightly worry about pesticides in their food. But then they spray their home and their yard liberally with all kinds of toxic stuff, simply because they can't stand the sight of even one bug.

    June 24, 2014 at 23:16 | Report abuse | Reply
  7. BigRicks

    Convenience is a quality of life that is killing us and the planet.

    June 24, 2014 at 23:46 | Report abuse | Reply
  8. bobb

    Lived within a mile of these pesticide-treated areas included parks, golf courses, pastures and roadsides? They were lucky to find people that didn't live within a mile of any of those locations for the negative control.

    June 25, 2014 at 00:24 | Report abuse | Reply
  9. Dave Thomas

    So autism isn't caused by mercury in inoculations anymore? This was the medical communities accepted link to autism for years.

    June 25, 2014 at 00:48 | Report abuse | Reply
    • Louis

      No Dave, neither the medical community nor the scientific community ever associated autism with mercury in vaccinations. There was one poorly performed study that made such a claim but that was refuted quickly. Sadly, that study that also caught the eye of irrational people who became terrified. The #1 prediction of having a child with a learning disability is the age of the mother. We are waiting longer to have kids and more of them will be unhealthy. But middle aged moms don't want to take the blame.

      June 25, 2014 at 00:58 | Report abuse |
  10. Charles

    I'm sorry, but the reporting here is nothing short of sensationalistic and grossly misrepresents what was actually researched. Exposure to pesticides was not studied. Living within a mile of parks, golf courses, pastures and roadsides was.

    An analysis of actual pesticide exposure (measured via blood levels/urine samples/hair samples/etc) would be far more suggestive of such a link. Even then, purely observational research (rather than a controlled intervention) is far less than ideal for demonstrating causation, as controlling for all relevant variables is very difficult. Obviously, ethical concerns prevent controlled intervention in all cases, but at the very least factors like family history of autism, SES, diet, age, physical activity levels, obesity (measured by bf% via hydrostatic weighing or DXA rather than BMI), metabolic panel results, prescription/recreational drug use, and pre/postnatal care need to be measured, reported, and controlled for if any strong suggestion of causation is to be established. Obviously, this is extremely difficult to do with observational research, and borderline impossible with epidemiological research.

    I'm not saying that it's wise for pregnant women to expose themselves to pesticides (quite a few of which have known teratogenic properties), nor am I saying that further research on this subjected is not warranted, nor am I faulting the authors of the study itself.

    This just stands out to me as a particularly severe example of a rather disturbing trend. To be perfectly frank, this sort of reporting comes across as a concerted effort to misreport on science to generate views and/or publicity. Perhaps that is not the case, and the authors and editors are simply not scientifically literate (This is not meant to be a slight or insult. The vast majority of people fall into this category, and even the vast majority of professional scientists are not fully literate in every area of science.)

    Either way, I don't feel like this sort of reporting is ethical. It is also tremendously unfair to the researchers whose work is being reported on. It is tantamount to putting words in their mouths, and twists potentially useful research into something else entirely. I'm sure these researchers would like to be able to definitively link the exposure of certain chemicals to autism, as that would allow them to have a profound positive impact on a huge number of lives. That is clearly not what this research even set out to do in the first place, and in many ways suggesting that it did so belittles the contribution that it did make to the collective body of scientific knowledge.

    Rant over. Carry on.

    June 25, 2014 at 01:52 | Report abuse | Reply
    • James A.

      Thank you.

      June 25, 2014 at 02:56 | Report abuse |
    • dawshoss

      Yeah this is a hypothesis generating study if anything, very first step...not evidence at all. Certainly not "proof" ...that word media loves to throw around.

      June 25, 2014 at 06:32 | Report abuse |
  11. MW

    This quoted form the conclusion section of that research paper (a review really): "Pesticides may
    or may not, however, play a role in the trend
    of increasing autism prevalence, which itself is
    likely due to a confluence of multiple phenomena,
    including changes in diagnostic practices,
    physician and lay awareness, the availability of
    treatments, and the prevalence of a variety of
    environmental chemical, medical, and foodrelated
    exposures."

    June 25, 2014 at 02:56 | Report abuse | Reply
  12. gavin

    A little poison won't hurt you...our government agencies tell us so all the time

    June 25, 2014 at 03:54 | Report abuse | Reply
    • nonovyerbeezwax

      No, the government does not tell us that at all. Nice try, but fail. You are repeating the same canards as the anti-vax nuts and the "NaturalNews" crazies who think that any amount of a substance they don't know how to pronounce is "poison."

      Preservatives and adjuvants in vaccines and medicines are not found in amounts that are harmful–"the dose makes the poison." People who rant about "toxins" in vaccines are the reason we have outbreaks of diseases that were once nearly eradicated. Ignorance is not bliss. It's dangerous.

      June 25, 2014 at 07:31 | Report abuse |
  13. KieranH

    Yes, you shouldn't drink from the bottle with the massive yellow SKULL AND CROSSBONES on the back. Genius!

    June 25, 2014 at 07:05 | Report abuse | Reply
  14. Floyd Schrodinger

    Come back when you actually have facts to talk about.

    June 25, 2014 at 07:29 | Report abuse | Reply
  15. Meg314

    Anti-vax nuts and Natural News crazies?? I think they've gone a little nuts on everything they vaccinate for. Chicken pox is not that big of a deal! And, I had them bad. And, it didn't scar me for life to have them. And, for those that think that the vaccines were causal...well, it DOES seem that way. There are an awful lot of very similar stories. My baby had great eye contact. He was snuggly, well, he's still snuggly at 7. He was super interactive. He never played with "parts" of toys. Vaccine day came, actually remember the day really well because the doctor actually commented on how much he was babbling and that he was going to talk any day now, and BAM, down we went. Was it the vaccines? I don't know. But, all the research showing that they don't, the only definitive proof you could offer is in the form of a time machine. I have looked at the research...and...meh....maybe...I know that it's like saying I ate a strawberry that day and I came down with the flu, therefore, strawberries cause the flu. But, that's all this research is doing, too. And, it doesn't really "solve" anything. Figure out what flips the switch. And, we can be done, thank you very much.

    June 25, 2014 at 12:25 | Report abuse | Reply
    • nonovyerbeezwax

      You were "done" before you got halfway through writing your idiotic spew.

      Studies aren't anecdotes, and they have shown there is no link between vaccines and autism. You're wrong about chicken pox and other childhood diseases that are now vaccine-preventable, too. Did you know that measles can cause a form of encephalitis? And that it is far more likely to have serious complications than the vaccine that prevents it? No, you didn't. Because you don't ever do any real research; you depend on spurious sites for your "information."

      As far as your "time machine," you might want to do a little reading about the history of autism. It occurred and was recognized long before vaccines were even created.

      "Figure out what flips the switch." Brilliant. Don't you think that's what researchers are trying to do? It is quite likely a combination of factors including genes. Wasting time blaming vaccines is dumb.

      June 25, 2014 at 14:16 | Report abuse |
    • Meg314

      My idiotic spew? So glad you're so open to letting other people have their own opinions when it comes to their own children. I said chicken pox, not measles. Did you know people have had severe reactions to vaccines? I'm not saying autism, I'm saying they die. And, I am very aware of the research they are doing to "flip the switch". I know they found suramin that flips the switch for 5 weeks...in mice. Congratulations, researchers! There are different "types" of autism. Not just the classic "born with it" type that has been around since Einstein (eyeroll) I test in the 98th percentile in math and science. I'm going to guess who is spewing idiocy. I've seen research say something doesn't do something, and oops, yes, it does before. And, I'm not blaming vaccines. I said I can see why parents do blame vaccines. It seems very causal, hence the strawberries and flu example.I think it's just as likely that it's a product of having highly intelligent parents, and based on that, I'm going to guess, if you do have kids, none of yours are.

      June 25, 2014 at 16:49 | Report abuse |
    • Meg314

      And, by the way, based on all your rants at others voicing their opinion, and your vaunted opinion that our government would never harm us, my mother used to be able to go and watch the mushroom cloud out in the Nevada desert. There were no warning signs. No effort to keep civilians away. In case you don't know what a mushroom cloud is referring to, we're talking about an atomic bomb, that, yes, they were testing with no regard to the health effects on the people who lived in that area, or how far the impact would reach. Maybe you need to take your own advice and "knock it off".

      June 25, 2014 at 17:07 | Report abuse |
    • nonovyerbeezwax

      Aww, what's the matter? Did I strike a nerve?

      Anyone who claims to "test in the 98th percentile in math and science" and proceeds to make herself look ridiculous by throwing a fit when her conclusions about studies concerning autism are questioned is hardly credible.

      Unless you can cite your sources, you are posting nothing but opinions based on … nothing.

      June 25, 2014 at 17:14 | Report abuse |
    • nonovyerbeezwax

      By the way, go ahead and cite the statistics that show the number of children who've died from childhood vaccines. Go ahead.

      June 25, 2014 at 17:16 | Report abuse |
    • nonovyerbeezwax

      Serious complications from chickenpox include

      dehydration
      pneumonia
      bleeding problems
      infection or inflammation of the brain (encephalitis, cerebellar ataxia)
      bacterial infections of the skin and soft tissues in children including Group A streptococcal infections
      blood stream infections (sepsis)
      toxic shock syndrome
      bone infections
      joint infections
      Some people with serious complications from chickenpox can become so sick that they need to be hospitalized. Chickenpox can also cause death.

      Some deaths from chickenpox continue to occur in healthy, unvaccinated children and adults. Many of the healthy adults who died from chickenpox contracted the disease from their unvaccinated children.

      June 25, 2014 at 17:22 | Report abuse |
    • Meg314

      You can get toxic shock syndrome from tampons. The definition of a healthy adult is always debatable. You know you just fling insults: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23790993. http://www.nvic.org/nvic-vaccine-news/may-2011/in-memoriam–infant-deaths-vaccination.aspx

      June 25, 2014 at 17:31 | Report abuse |
    • nonovyerbeezwax

      That's pretty funny, citing a study in which most of the deaths occurred in people who were about 85 years old.

      The fact is that not just one but multiple studies have shown no link between vaccines and autism. Yammering about toxic shock syndrome among tampon users doesn't much help to make your point, either.

      June 25, 2014 at 18:08 | Report abuse |
    • nonovyerbeezwax

      Meg 314: "But, all the research showing that they don't, the only definitive proof you could offer is in the form of a time machine. I have looked at the research...and...meh....maybe...I know that it's like saying I ate a strawberry that day and I came down with the flu, therefore, strawberries cause the flu. But, that's all this research is doing, too. And, it doesn't really "solve" anything."

      Research doesn't rely solely on anecdotes. It isn't "all the research is doing." Just because it hasn't "solved anything" yet (and it has actually shown quite a lot) doesn't mean it won't. I have no idea what you're talking about when you say that researchers should find out what "flips the switch" and "then we can be done, thank you very much." You imply that researchers have accomplished nothing, which is not accurate.

      You confuse correlation with causation.

      June 25, 2014 at 18:15 | Report abuse |
    • Meg314

      People THINK it's "causal".

      June 25, 2014 at 18:28 | Report abuse |
    • Meg314

      http://www.cbsnews.com/news/vaccines-autism-and-brain-damage-whats-in-a-name/

      Total Number of Brain Injury Cases Compensated in Federal Vaccine Court

      (as of May 2010 and including the newly-released settlement of the Hannah Poling autism case)

      Encephalitis/Encephalopathy: 639

      Seizure Disorders: 656

      Autism 1*

      Total: 1,296

      Source: HHS-HRSA (Health and Human Services Health Resources and Services Administration)

      Just because you dissed my previous sources. Serious enough side effects for you there? Going on with my life now and pretending people like you don't exist.

      June 25, 2014 at 19:14 | Report abuse |
    • Meg314

      OMG! Would you look at that!? Vaccines can cause encephalitis, too!?

      June 25, 2014 at 19:15 | Report abuse |
    • nonovyerbeezwax

      Of course they can. Nobody ever said they couldn't, or that vaccines are 100% safe 100% of the time for 100% of all people. The fact is, however, that they cause encephalitis far, far less often than measles. The fact is that vaccines are much safer than the diseases they prevent.

      And they don't cause autism. Study after study after study has shown no link.

      June 25, 2014 at 20:19 | Report abuse |
    • nonovyerbeezwax

      You have yet to explain what you mean when you say you've "read the studies and meh, you still don't know whether vaccines cause autism."

      They don't.

      http://www2.aap.org/immunization/families/safety.html

      June 25, 2014 at 20:25 | Report abuse |
    • meg314

      Explain to my simple mind HOW they have disproved it. Just don't say they've shown study after study that disproves it. Tell me how. I read a quote by Temple Grandin in an interview that they've disproved that vaccines don't cause classic onset autism, but she thinks the jury is still out for regressive autism. I've seen lots of studies that show how autistic kids aren't producing glutathione, they don't have dmg in their "guts", and this stuff all makes sense to me because I understand how it processes through the body, but HOW do you prove that vaccines don't cause autism because what I read was about the number of antibodies being given does not vary between neurotypical children and autistic children and I guess I don't understand how that disproves that it causes anything. Now, it is very possible that I missed something there, and if you can explain it, I would be more than happy to listen. For now, I am taking it on faith, with the caveat, that I think they could still find they are wrong based on a rather knowledgeable woman's quote, that vaccines don't cause autism. But, with the caveat, too, that I understand how parents can blame the vaccines. And, to me, these studies like this do little to help so many, and just makes mother's rack their minds for when they were exposed to pesticides when they were pregnant. One more thing to freak us out about. They just barely did the link to air pollution and we're supposed to move if at all plausible to lesser polluted areas when we're pregnant. I wasn't able to move, and now my child is autistic. Sometimes, you feel like mother's who used meth when they were pregnant have fewer problems with their babies. And, yes, Mother's feel a lot of guilt. So, I'm guessing here, but I'm curious about what you do for a living. And, no offense, but you kind of just attack people and their intelligence in your posts without being informative as to why they're wrong, so while my post is saying nothing to you, I still have a right to post that I don't really think this study is helpful and I think they should be focusing on what I've heard autism researchers call "the switch that turns the lights on in that side of the brain." In utero, they've done air pollution, pesticides, folic acid, there's something else that I'm not quite hitting on at the moment. I'm tired of it. I'm past that point. I want to be selfish and see research that's going to help me. Same as parents who have autistic adults want something that helps them now. If you want my honest opinion, I like the research with TSO. I think their theory makes sense. :) Have a nice life. Sorry you put me on the defensive there for a minute. I'm sure you're a nice person...somewhere in there...

      June 25, 2014 at 23:43 | Report abuse |
    • meg314

      You're like Orwell's thought police! Hahaha! They also did the autism related to stress, and, my personal favorite, the fat mom theory. Go to a story about gun rights and tell them guns kill people. I dare you!

      June 26, 2014 at 00:43 | Report abuse |
  16. Squeezebox

    Better to have an autistic kid than a dead one. Better to have an autistic kid than a crippled one. Ask the parents of a polio victim.

    June 25, 2014 at 15:06 | Report abuse | Reply
    • drcub1908

      Most polio cases are from the vaccine..take a look what the US has caused in other countries...Polio-like...is what they call it..

      June 26, 2014 at 14:51 | Report abuse |
    • Russian Judge

      Nope. Wrong again.

      July 2, 2014 at 09:18 | Report abuse |
  17. Meg314

    Will you shut up, yet?

    June 25, 2014 at 17:36 | Report abuse | Reply
    • nonovyerbeezwax

      If it bothers you so, don't read it.

      June 25, 2014 at 18:15 | Report abuse |
    • Meg314

      You're right. You're beneath my notice.

      June 25, 2014 at 18:37 | Report abuse |
    • nonovyerbeezwax

      Apparently not.

      June 25, 2014 at 20:22 | Report abuse |
  18. Meg314

    I don't see you actually "citing" anything for any studies. Just your ever so lovely opinion. I'm not trying to show a link between vaccines and autism. You just don't know how to read a metaphor. Do you think I really think strawberries cause the flu!? I'm saying that's where the causality comes from. They're fine, we vaccinate, not fine. Nowhere do I say, vaccines cause autism. I said it's like eating a strawberry and getting the flu. Well, I ate a strawberry, ergo, strawberries cause the flu. They don't cause the flu. It could be assumed that they caused the flu if you knew a whole bunch of people who got the flu every time they ate a strawberry. But, then, you do the scientific part, and, no it's a virus that causes the flu. But, you can see where they are coming from. Did I spell it out for you well enough this time? People die all the time. Guess what causes it? Their heart stops beating.

    June 25, 2014 at 18:23 | Report abuse | Reply
    • nonovyerbeezwax

      Yet another post in which you essentially say nothing at all.

      June 25, 2014 at 20:20 | Report abuse |
  19. drcub1908

    autism is multi-factoral..glyphosphate used in RoundUp is a culprit..but also injecting poisons directly into the blood stream along with the adjuvants of heavy metals cross the blood-brain barrier..stop vaccination so much...
    my 3 kids ages 12,10, 6 have no health problems..of course they don't drink milk, get vitamins, and NO VACCINES..
    Vaccines are a direct link..please wake up to that fact. vaccines are not effective nor are they safe..

    June 26, 2014 at 14:50 | Report abuse | Reply
    • Russian Judge

      Sure. You must be right. After all, only 99.9% of scientists and doctors disagree with you. They must all be wrong.

      What a dope.

      July 2, 2014 at 09:17 | Report abuse |
  20. vm

    study linking pestdicides and autism

    \\First, there is a fatal flaw in the study design: the authors used proximity to pesticide use (either within 1.25, 1.5, or 1.75 km of the use) to estimate pesticide exposure. However, they made no attempt to justify their core assumption – that this proximity significantly affects pesticide exposure. There were no measurements of specific pesticides in the blood or urine of mothers, and no measurement of pesticides in the local environment where they lived. Proximity was the only measure.

    If living 1.5 vs 3 km away from a farm using a certain pesticide has no significant affect on exposure, then the entire study evaporates.

    Also, the data itself are far from convincing. The three groups in the study were relatively small for a case-controls study – ASD = 486, DD = 168, and typically developing referents = 316. Keep in mind these break down further into smaller and smaller groups based upon type of pesticide and distance from use.\\

    http://theness.com/neurologicablog/index.php/pesticides-and-autism/

    June 28, 2014 at 19:17 | Report abuse | Reply

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