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December 5th, 2012
03:01 PM ET

Anti-cancer champion coach beats his own cancer

Editor's Note: In the Human Factor, we profile survivors who have overcome the odds.  Confronting a life obstacle – injury, illness or other hardship – they tapped their inner strength and found resilience they didn't know they possessed.  This week we introduce you to Brigham Young University Men's Basketball Coach Dave Rose.   For the past two decades, he has been involved with a group called Coaches vs. Cancer. Being part of this group took on a whole new meaning for Rose over the past three years.  

In June of 2009, my wife and I went on vacation with our children and grandchildren to Disneyland.  At that time, I was very intense about my job, so my wife will say she had to drag me away from my team and coaching.  I'm so glad she did.  We had a wonderful time.  It was the perfect vacation with my whole family.

After Disneyland, things for me took a turn.  I became very sick on a flight from California to Las Vegas, and when we landed I was taken by ambulance to Spring Valley Hospital.  A CT scan showed there was a mass in my abdomen, so the doctors went in and removed it along with my spleen and part of my pancreas.  The next day they told us it was pancreatic cancer. FULL POST

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Filed under: Cancer • Conditions • Human Factor • Living Well

Breath test could detect colorectal cancer
December 5th, 2012
12:01 PM ET

Breath test could detect colorectal cancer

The death rate for colorectal cancer has been dropping for more than 20 years, thanks in part to improved screening methods, according to the American Cancer Society. Yet it is still the second-leading cause of cancer-related deaths for men and women combined in the United States.

Colonoscopy screenings can prevent about two-thirds of colorectal cancers from developing by detecting precancerous polyps, said Dr. Ted Gansler, director of medical content for ACS.  The ACS recommends men and women over the age of 50 should have a colonoscopy once every 10 years or a yearly fecal blood test.

“Unfortunately, only about half of people age 50 and older in the U.S. are up-to-date on their testing for colorectal cancer,” Gansler said.

Dr. Donato Altomare and his colleagues hope to change that.  The researchers have completed a small clinical trial on a breath test that screens for colorectal cancer using volatile organic compounds.  The results of their study were published this week in the British Journal of Surgery.
FULL POST


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Get a behind-the-scenes look at the latest stories from CNN Chief Medical Correspondent, Dr. Sanjay Gupta, Senior Medical Correspondent Elizabeth Cohen and the CNN Medical Unit producers. They'll share news and views on health and medical trends - info that will help you take better care of yourself and the people you love.

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