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Overheard on CNN: Less pink, more cures for breast cancer
October 26th, 2012
07:15 AM ET

Overheard on CNN: Less pink, more cures for breast cancer

Editor's note: This post is part of the Overheard on CNN.com series, a regular feature that examines interesting comments and thought-provoking conversations posted by the community.

October is Breast Cancer Awareness Month, as you might have gathered from pink ribbons and fundraising events in your community.

Many CNN commenters expressed skepticism about the so-called “pinkwashing” of October, echoing the sentiments of some women quoted in my recent article who don't feel connected to all of the awareness efforts.
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Applegate: 'I miss my exquisite breasts'
October 25th, 2012
04:01 PM ET

Applegate: 'I miss my exquisite breasts'

Christina Applegate, star of the television comedy “Up All Night,” has talked openly about her experience with breast cancer.

Still, the actress wishes she hadn’t been outed to the world in 2008 before the anesthetic from her mastectomy surgery even wore off.

“The good thing is that we got the information out,” Applegate says in this month’s edition of MORE magazine. “But talking about the facts of the disease, I didn’t have to see what was going on with me. I think when it slowed down, all of that came crashing down.”
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Study: Taking aspirin may extend survival for some colon cancer patients
October 25th, 2012
12:23 PM ET

Study: Taking aspirin may extend survival for some colon cancer patients

For more than a decade, studies have shown that some cancer patients benefit from taking aspirin, but who exactly might benefit remained unclear.  Now a new study appears to have found a specific patient population that may live longer by taking this drug: Colon cancer patients.

After reviewing data from 964 colorectal cancer patients, researchers at the Dana-Farber Cancer Institute in Boston found when patients whose tumors had a mutated form of the PIK3CA gene took aspirin after being diagnosed, they lived significantly longer than patients without the mutation.

The study is published in the October 25 edition of the New England Journal of Medicine. Ninety-seven percent of patients with this mutation who took aspirin were alive five years after being diagnosed with colon cancer. Only 76% of patients with the mutation who didn't take aspirin were still alive five years later. FULL POST


October 24th, 2012
08:15 PM ET

Post removed: Study looks at voting and hormones

A post previously published in this space regarding a study about how hormones may influence voting choices has been removed.

After further review it was determined that some elements of the story did not meet the editorial standards of CNN.

We thank you for your comments and feedback.

 


Filed under: No Category

Can hormone therapy help protect the brain?
October 24th, 2012
06:01 PM ET

Can hormone therapy help protect the brain?

A decade ago, researchers shocked women around the world when they abruptly halted a landmark clinical trial on hormone therapy, a drug regimen widely used to relieve hot flashes, night sweats, and other unpleasant symptoms of menopause.

Just five years in, the study results suggested that hormone therapy increased the risk of several serious health conditions, including breast cancer, heart disease, and stroke. A follow-up study soon added Alzheimer's disease to the list, after finding that women taking hormones had higher rates of dementia than women taking placebo.

Since then, however, doctors have begun to reexamine hormone therapy and the conclusions of the trial, known as the Women's Health Initiative. In the latest such study, published today in the journal Neurology, researchers report that taking hormones may actually lower, not raise, the risk of developing Alzheimer's disease.

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Filed under: Alzheimer's • Health.com

Neighborhood determines likelihood bystanders will offer CPR
October 24th, 2012
05:31 PM ET

Neighborhood determines likelihood bystanders will offer CPR

Imagine this scenario: a middle-aged man clutches his chest and falls to the ground in a grocery store parking lot.  He's unconscious and seems to be in the throes of cardiac arrest.  There are people in the parking lot around him and almost all of them saw him fall.

Will someone give this man cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR)?  Well, that may depend on the type of neighborhood he's in.

A new study published Wednesday in the New England Journal of Medicine found that the rate of bystander-initiated CPR varies according to the characteristics of the neighborhood where the cardiac arrest occurred.  If the man in the above scenario collapsed in a high-income, non-African-American neighborhood, the odds that someone would give him CPR are higher than if he fell in a low-income or predominantly African-American neighborhood. FULL POST


Whooping cough vaccine recommended for all pregnant women
October 24th, 2012
03:26 PM ET

Whooping cough vaccine recommended for all pregnant women

A federal advisory committee is recommending all pregnant women be immunized for pertussis or whooping cough.

The Advisory Committee for Immunization Practices (ACIP) for the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention met Wednesday and voted 14 to 0, with one abstention, to recommend health care providers begin immunizations programs for Tdap.  This is a vaccine that provides protection against tetanus, diphtheria and pertussis (whooping cough).

The committee says the vaccine should be administered during each pregnancy in the late second or third trimester (27 to 36 weeks gestation), regardless of whether the patient has had Tdap in the past. If that's not possible, the mother should receive the vaccine immediately after childbirth or before leaving the hospital or birthing center.  Jennifer Liang, a member of the ACIP pertussis vaccine working group, told the committee the vaccine is very safe in all trimesters and could be given at any time during pregnancy.

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Grandparents need to be better informed when caring for kids
October 24th, 2012
01:58 PM ET

Grandparents need to be better informed when caring for kids

A growing number of grandparents are raising their grandchildren and a new study suggests they may not be as informed as they need to be when it comes to safety.

While grandparents do have years of child-rearing experience, a study presented this week at the American Academy of Pediatrics conference says some are relying on old data and unintentionally putting their grandkids' health and safety at risk.

"Pediatricians need to be aware, and they need to make sure they are going over (the) most recent safety recommendations with grandparents," says lead study author Dr. Amanda Soong.
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Your food, your vote
A new coalition rates Congress' votes on issues including farm subsidies, food safety and anti-hunger policies.
October 23rd, 2012
09:02 PM ET

Your food, your vote

Editors' note: Tom Colicchio talks about food and your vote on "Sanjay Gupta MD," Saturday at 4:30 p.m. ET and Sunday at 7:30 a.m. ET.

Jobs… Obamacare… Iran… and food?

Voters looking for a reason to support or oppose a candidate will find new ammunition in the first-ever “National Food Policy Scorecard,” created by a coalition of non-profits including environmental advocates, anti-hunger groups and activists including “Top Chef’s” lead judge and restauranteur Tom Colicchio.

“I don’t think the average person thinks this stuff through,” says Colicchio, who sees a link between government policy and what families put on the table.  “When you see people who are struggling, and buying fast food for kids, it’s not because they think it’s great for you.  It’s because it’s cheap.  And it’s cheap because the government subsidizes corn, wheat and soy.  That’s what we’re supporting with our tax dollars.  What if we took that money and put it towards farmers growing fresh, organic vegetables?”
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Doctors: Warning labels on magnetic toys aren't enough
October 23rd, 2012
06:13 PM ET

Doctors: Warning labels on magnetic toys aren't enough

Warning labels are not working to prevent children from ingesting Buckyballs and other powerful magnetic toys, a group of digestive health doctors said Tuesday.

The magnets can pierce holes in the intestines, and some children have needed multiple surgeries and lengthy hospitalizations.  Since 2010, there have been warning labels on Buckyballs - on five places in each box, and in accompanying instructions - aimed at keeping the magnets away from children.

But the warning labels on the high-powered magnetic toys are ineffective, the North American Society for Pediatric Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Nutrition said Tuesday.  The group released the results of a new survey of more than 1,700 doctors, who reported at least 480 toy magnet ingestions in the past decade, with 204  occurring in the past year. FULL POST


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Get a behind-the-scenes look at the latest stories from CNN Chief Medical Correspondent, Dr. Sanjay Gupta, Senior Medical Correspondent Elizabeth Cohen and the CNN Medical Unit producers. They'll share news and views on health and medical trends - info that will help you take better care of yourself and the people you love.

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