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Sandy's flooding: 5 things you need to know
A flooded street in the Dumbo section of Brooklyn, New York, on Tuesday in the aftermath of Superstorm Sandy.
October 30th, 2012
01:27 PM ET

Sandy's flooding: 5 things you need to know

Flooding overwhelmed parts of the East Coast Tuesday as a result of Superstorm Sandy.

In Little Ferry, New Jersey, floodwaters were six to eight feet deep, and about 75% of the city was underwater, according to the police chief.

“We have people who were actually on roofs of their homes in certain sections. We needed, actually, boats – we’re still using boats to get people out of the low-lying areas,” Chief Ralph Verdi told CNN. “I’ve been a police officer for 33 years. I’ve never seen this type of devastation from flooding.”

Fourteen miles to the south, in Newark, New Jersey, the city’s mayor cautioned residents about the severe flooding.

“There are many, many hazards in the streets. Many downed power lines. Still many flooded areas," Mayor Cory Booker told CNN. “People’s safety is still principally important."

Here are five things to keep in mind during flooding:

1. Standing water is potentially dangerous

It may be electrically charged from downed power lines, or contaminated by oil, gasoline or sewage, according to the Federal Emergency Management Agency.

2. So is moving water

Just six inches of shallow moving water can make you fall, according to FEMA. The agency advises walking on firm ground where the water isn’t moving – and using a stick to check how solid your footing is.

3. Flood zones can still be risky after water recedes

FEMA warns roads may erode or weaken after a flood. The weight of a car could make them collapse.

4. Be careful re-entering a flooded home

If you can reach the main power switch from a dry location, go ahead and turn off the electricity. But if you have to wade into floodwaters, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention advises calling an electrician. Also, the foundation of your home may have weakened, so FEMA warns using extreme caution when you go inside.

5. Stay safe cleaning up

You’ll want to wear rubber boots, rubber gloves and goggles to avoid being injured by any sharp objects, such as glass or metal, in floodwaters. Since the water may be filthy, any injuries could lead to infections. The CDC has a list of steps to help flood victims stay safe while cleaning up the inside and outside of their homes.


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soundoff (3 Responses)
  1. Romney Wants To Get Rid Of FEMA

    How do you storm victims feel about that?

    October 30, 2012 at 14:45 | Report abuse | Reply
  2. Jessica

    Romney can stick it. With more and more whacky weather and "Storm of the Century" happening 3 times in 5 years he would be un-smart to get rid of FEMA.

    Of course getting rid of FEMA is right in line with the rights mantra of everyone for themselves and s c r e w you if you weren't prepared or expected it.

    October 31, 2012 at 22:40 | Report abuse | Reply
  3. ruth

    FEMA is a joke and it is broke ,had a tornado in Ohio in 1985,I am still waiting for fema!

    November 2, 2012 at 18:46 | Report abuse | Reply

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Get a behind-the-scenes look at the latest stories from CNN Chief Medical Correspondent, Dr. Sanjay Gupta, Senior Medical Correspondent Elizabeth Cohen and the CNN Medical Unit producers. They'll share news and views on health and medical trends - info that will help you take better care of yourself and the people you love.