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Post-Sandy water safety tips
You should even use bottled or disinfected water when brushing your teeth after a natural disaster, experts say.
October 30th, 2012
12:21 PM ET

Post-Sandy water safety tips

Ever heard the line, “Water, water, everywhere and not a drop to drink?" Never is that more true than during a hurricane.

Superstorm Sandy came ashore Monday night, flooding parts of the East Coast. After a natural disaster, your water may not be safe for use, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. This includes any water used for drinking, cooking, food preparation and/or personal hygiene.

Residents in Sandy’s path should be on the lookout for boil water advisories from their local and state departments of health, as well as from utility companies. These signify that your water may be contaminated.

Still, even if no notice has been issued, consumers should never assume that water in a flood-affected area is safe to drink, the Rhode Island Department of Health says.

Flood waters may permeate the public water supply or private wells, bringing disease-causing organisms like viruses and parasites.

"Limit toilet flushing and showering, and avoid using dishwashers and washing machines," Rhode Island's emergency site states. "These appliances all drain water into the sewage treatment system. Continual use could cause sewage backup and overflow."

Using bottled water is, of course, the easiest option. Otherwise, boiling is the most effective way to disinfect water, according to the CDC.

To properly kill bacteria, boil water for a full minute. If you cannot boil your water due to power outages, you may add 1/8 teaspoon of unscented, liquid bleach into a gallon of water and wait for 30 minutes before use.

If your water is cloudy, filter if first through a paper towel or coffee filter. It’s important to note, the CDC says, that boiling or bleaching water will not detoxify water contaminated with fuel or other chemicals. Seek another water source if you suspect yours is toxic.

For more information, visit the CDC’s website at http://emergency.cdc.gov


soundoff (3 Responses)
  1. Romney Wants To Get Rid Of FEMA

    RoMoney wants to get rid of FEMA. How do you storm victims feel about that?

    October 30, 2012 at 12:34 | Report abuse | Reply
  2. icon pack

    Certainly. I agree with you.

    November 4, 2012 at 12:11 | Report abuse | Reply
  3. Good Grief

    Come on, people. It's "water, water, everywhere, NOR ANY drop to drink". Coleridge.

    November 9, 2012 at 14:18 | Report abuse | Reply

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Get a behind-the-scenes look at the latest stories from CNN Chief Medical Correspondent, Dr. Sanjay Gupta, Senior Medical Correspondent Elizabeth Cohen and the CNN Medical Unit producers. They'll share news and views on health and medical trends - info that will help you take better care of yourself and the people you love.