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Your food, your vote
A new coalition rates Congress' votes on issues including farm subsidies, food safety and anti-hunger policies.
October 23rd, 2012
09:02 PM ET

Your food, your vote

Editors' note: Tom Colicchio talks about food and your vote on "Sanjay Gupta MD," Saturday at 4:30 p.m. ET and Sunday at 7:30 a.m. ET.

Jobs… Obamacare… Iran… and food?

Voters looking for a reason to support or oppose a candidate will find new ammunition in the first-ever “National Food Policy Scorecard,” created by a coalition of non-profits including environmental advocates, anti-hunger groups and activists including “Top Chef’s” lead judge and restauranteur Tom Colicchio.

“I don’t think the average person thinks this stuff through,” says Colicchio, who sees a link between government policy and what families put on the table.  “When you see people who are struggling, and buying fast food for kids, it’s not because they think it’s great for you.  It’s because it’s cheap.  And it’s cheap because the government subsidizes corn, wheat and soy.  That’s what we’re supporting with our tax dollars.  What if we took that money and put it towards farmers growing fresh, organic vegetables?”
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Doctors: Warning labels on magnetic toys aren't enough
October 23rd, 2012
06:13 PM ET

Doctors: Warning labels on magnetic toys aren't enough

Warning labels are not working to prevent children from ingesting Buckyballs and other powerful magnetic toys, a group of digestive health doctors said Tuesday.

The magnets can pierce holes in the intestines, and some children have needed multiple surgeries and lengthy hospitalizations.  Since 2010, there have been warning labels on Buckyballs - on five places in each box, and in accompanying instructions - aimed at keeping the magnets away from children.

But the warning labels on the high-powered magnetic toys are ineffective, the North American Society for Pediatric Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Nutrition said Tuesday.  The group released the results of a new survey of more than 1,700 doctors, who reported at least 480 toy magnet ingestions in the past decade, with 204  occurring in the past year. FULL POST


Exercise may preserve brain better than games
October 23rd, 2012
04:11 PM ET

Exercise may preserve brain better than games

One of the sad realities about Alzheimer's disease is that there's no way of preventing it – at least not yet.  We know some people are genetically or biologically at greater risk than others, but researchers want to find out how we can fight it off, or at least delay it.

The strongest evidence for a lifestyle choice associated with Alzheimer's prevention is exercise.  A new study in the journal Neurology supports that, and also suggests that working out is more effective at protecting the brain than cognitive challenges such as games and puzzles.

Researchers studied a group of nearly 700 participants from Scotland, all born in 1936, who reported their leisure and physical activity levels at age 70.  They rated physical activity on a scale from "moving only in connection with necessary (household) chores" to "keep-fit/heavy exercise or competitive sport several times per week," the study said.  Participants also rated how often they engaged in various social and intellectual activities.

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Get a behind-the-scenes look at the latest stories from CNN Chief Medical Correspondent, Dr. Sanjay Gupta, Senior Medical Correspondent Elizabeth Cohen and the CNN Medical Unit producers. They'll share news and views on health and medical trends - info that will help you take better care of yourself and the people you love.

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