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Study: HPV vaccine does not encourage sexual activity
October 15th, 2012
12:01 AM ET

Study: HPV vaccine does not encourage sexual activity

There's been a lot of controversy over the HPV vaccine. Because Gardasil is designed to protect young people against human papillomavirus, a common sexually transmitted disease, some people believe the inoculation gives teens the go-ahead to have sex.

Researchers are finding that's not the case.

HPV is known to be the cause of a number of illnesses, including mouth and throat cancer, genital warts and cervical cancer. Since 2006, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has recommended that all girls aged 11 and 12 receive the HPV vaccine to protect themselves. The American Academy of Pediatrics has also advised that girls and boys at that age be given the shot to fight the virus strain.

But according to a new Kaiser Permanete/Emory University study published in this week's edition of the journal Pediatrics, the vaccine has yet to be embraced by the general public. By 2010, fewer than half of girls eligible for the vaccine had received even one dose.

Investigators believe that may be in part because some people who oppose the vaccine wrongly believe that it also protects against pregnancy and other sexually transmitted diseases, which would open the door for pre-teens to engage in sexual activity at an early age.

The study finds that vaccinating children at ages 11 and 12 does not increase sexual activity in young girls. Researchers looked at the number of pregnancies, sexually transmitted infections and contraceptive use in more than 1,300 pre-teen girls who received the vaccine.

Investigators followed them for three years and found no significant increase in any of these sexual activities.

“Our study found a very similar rate of testing, diagnosis and counseling among girls who received the vaccine and girls who did not,” said Dr. Robert Bednarczyk, an epidemiologist at Emory and the study's lead author. “We saw no increase in pregnancies, sexually transmitted infections or birth control counseling - all of which suggest the HPV vaccine does not have an impact on increased sexual activity.”

The authors note while it's known that having sex at an early age with multiple partners is a risk factor for getting the HPV infection, their study is the first to find that getting vaccinated does not modify these young girls' sexual behavior.

“It’s important we let physicians and parents know that they can put their fears to rest,” says Bednarczyk. “The vaccine does not seem to change a young girl’s attitude towards sex and ... receiving the shot is a good way to protect a child or young adult, once they get into their sexual years.”


soundoff (100 Responses)
  1. Missbeth

    "HPV vaccine does not encourage sexual activity"
    Duh!

    October 15, 2012 at 09:00 | Report abuse | Reply
    • Dean

      It seems terribly obvious doesn't it? Unfortunately many people are to stupid or stubborn to understand that vaccines are a tremendous benefit to society and to the people that use them.

      October 15, 2012 at 10:02 | Report abuse |
    • Polly

      The sad part is people who believe that this makes girls more sexually active are not the types who will read this and care anyway. They are the types that are overly skeptical of reason and logic and overly embracing of feelings and tradition. Their skepticism will be applied to this while they never once question the values they live their lives around.

      October 15, 2012 at 12:35 | Report abuse |
    • Bob

      @Polly: Maybe we should put them on the House Committee on Science, Space, and Technology. They'd fit right in with some of the jokers there.

      October 15, 2012 at 13:06 | Report abuse |
    • hannah

      Seriously. Does getting a tetanus shot make you more likely to step on a nail? 0__o

      October 15, 2012 at 13:25 | Report abuse |
    • incredulous

      Really? When I got my tetanus shot I looked for rusty nails to step on.

      October 15, 2012 at 14:33 | Report abuse |
  2. A_Survivor

    As a person who has HPV – I would tell all parents to get their kids vaccinated. I didn't have a choice – date raped at 17 gave me a life of problems. at 23 I had my first HPV related surgery – 20 years later I've had another 5 proceedures. I worry about cancer and leaving my kids without a mother. Don't risk it – it doesn't encourage promiscuity and it could save your life.

    October 15, 2012 at 10:10 | Report abuse | Reply
    • Sky

      II'm so very sorry to hear that.. Some people are just sick in the head.

      October 15, 2012 at 10:44 | Report abuse |
    • beadlesaz

      A_Survivor – please be aware that HPV has been linked to the growing frequency of anal cancer as well as oral cancer, penile cancer, etc. I was diagnosed and (so far) successfully treated for it in 2009. Thought I had a in hemorrhoid but my gp doctor couldn't be bothered to verify. Gave me a referral to a rectal surgeon. But because of the routine nature of the referral, it took 2 months to see the specialist. Meanwhile the cancer had spread to inguinal lymph nodes. It is believed that my anal cancer was due to a history of smoking rather than HPV. Regardless of the cause – all adults should have a "digital rectal exam" annually – a gloved finger inserted in the rectum. Nothing fancy – nothing high tech. Embarrassing but not painful (at least not compared to radiation burns in the groin removing the skin for 3 months!).

      October 15, 2012 at 11:10 | Report abuse |
    • I have HPV

      Huh ? I have HPV and had one procedure to remove the genital warts. That was it. Havent had any new warts since the last 2 years. How could you have 5 procedures after 1 exposure and why do you still have things happening? HPV is cured after a year or so by your body's immune system. No idea what is going on with you !! I think you might have some other incurable disease !! Oh yeah, I was very promiscuous but not anymore since I want to find someone to marry now.

      October 15, 2012 at 15:06 | Report abuse |
    • acanders

      @ihavehpv: it is such a shame that you decided to post such an ignorant response to something you obviously know nothing about. There are multiple strains of HPV, many of which cause more serious complications than warts. The cancer causing strains of the virus can be very aggressive and need multiple treatments. Unfortunately, you only contracted the warts variety...

      October 21, 2012 at 18:43 | Report abuse |
  3. giggity

    explain that to romney &co

    October 15, 2012 at 10:14 | Report abuse | Reply
    • Calvin

      explain it to your butt.

      October 15, 2012 at 13:05 | Report abuse |
    • Tom, Tom, The Piper's Son

      @Calvin

      Why not? One a.ss is as good as another I suppose.

      October 15, 2012 at 13:22 | Report abuse |
  4. realoldguy

    Unfortunately, conservatives have contempt for facts. It comes from reading all those books with the really big print.

    October 15, 2012 at 10:14 | Report abuse | Reply
    • Sidewinder

      The problem with "conservative" politicians is that they have to refer to their lobbyist handlers before they can have an opinion. Lets ask Akin whether a "legitimate" r@pe will kick in that mechanism women have to "shut that thing down" and keep them from being infected. I bet the hard line religious groups will kick up a fuss about this vaccine like they did with birth control pills.

      October 17, 2012 at 12:12 | Report abuse |
  5. Dan I

    This is the same logic that leads the far right to support "abstience only education" out of some belief that teaching kids about birth control will lead them to having sex all the time.

    Yes the U.S. has far, FAR higher rates of teen pregnancy and STD's than countries with more liberal (and logical) programs that are all-encompassing. They don't ignore abstinence (it is the only 100% safe method of consensual birth control). But they are comprehensive.

    The far right just wants to ignore the fact that telling teenagers "just don't do it" is not now and has NEVER worked.

    October 15, 2012 at 10:25 | Report abuse | Reply
  6. Joe

    "protects against pregnancy and other sexually transmitted diseases"
    This statement makes pregnancy sound like a disease.

    October 15, 2012 at 10:26 | Report abuse | Reply
    • Word_Guy

      Ha ha Joe! Good find!

      October 15, 2012 at 11:45 | Report abuse |
    • kayla

      It is.

      October 15, 2012 at 12:25 | Report abuse |
    • Tom, Tom, The Piper's Son

      Only if repeating yourself in the same sentence makes sense to you.

      October 15, 2012 at 13:24 | Report abuse |
    • Michael Hunt, Esq.

      Didn't you know? Pregnancy is the only cancerous STD.

      October 15, 2012 at 15:26 | Report abuse |
  7. AFather

    As a father of 2 girls and one boy, I am a huge supporter of vacinating my kids now. I would hate to look back and say I wish I had. My oldest daughter had the shot, My 2 younger children will get the shot as a part of their imunization shots. I do not promote premarital sex in anyway however I know there is more than a 90% chance of it happening. I also know that kids take risks and if I can silently protect them even slightly I will.

    October 15, 2012 at 10:30 | Report abuse | Reply
    • RobK

      There are actually three shots. If your kid only got one shot they are not adequately protected.

      October 15, 2012 at 10:58 | Report abuse |
    • drcub1908

      The HPV Vaccine Risks You're Not Being Told About

      As of August 13, 2012, VAERS has received 119 reports of death following HPV vaccination,4 as well as:

      894 reports of disability
      517 life-threatening adverse events
      9,889 emergency room visits
      2,781 hospitalizations

      If you VACCINATE – YOU ARE NOT DOING YOUR HOMEWORK..
      TO ASSUME A SHOT IS HELPFUL IS IGNORANT

      October 16, 2012 at 08:51 | Report abuse |
    • Sidewinder

      These reports do not necessarily mean that gardasil is responsible. In the case of blood clots reported after vaccination, there are other risk factors involved, like taking birth control and smoking. I would, however, like to see more independent studies performed.

      October 17, 2012 at 12:30 | Report abuse |
  8. Bob

    There is no need to tell kids what the vaccine is for, if you are worried about it. It's just like every other health issue kids get vaccines for – you tell them they are getting a shot so they don't get sick. If they don't know what the shots are for there is no chance for them to make the association between this and the actions the religious whack jobs are worried about.

    October 15, 2012 at 10:36 | Report abuse | Reply
    • Chris R

      The problem is that Americans don't like to think of their children as sexual beings. It's uncomfortable and weird for them even though they went through the same thoughts, feelings, and desires themselves. The vaccine drives home the point that your child will, some day, have sex and I really think it's too much for some people to think about.

      October 15, 2012 at 10:56 | Report abuse |
    • Nicole

      While I agree, this is an option for those parents who are worried about kids seeing this as permission for sex, I went the other way with my children. All 3 of my kids have been vaccinated (11, 14 & 16) and I used this as an opportunity to discuss sex and all of the things that can result from having it too early. The best thing I can do for my kids at this point is educate them to make good decisions.

      October 15, 2012 at 11:54 | Report abuse |
    • drcub1908

      Yes why tell kids that they are going to be sicker, get autism or even death..

      October 16, 2012 at 08:52 | Report abuse |
  9. RobK

    Keep in mind that the vaccine does not protect against all HPV varieties and the varieties it does protect against account for less than 90% of cervical cancers. While short term studies have found that it is relatively safe, there have been no long term studies. Forewarned is forearmed.

    October 15, 2012 at 10:56 | Report abuse | Reply
    • TomM

      wrong, it gives protection for OVER 90% of types that cause cervical cancers.

      October 15, 2012 at 11:24 | Report abuse |
    • swishiness

      You're both wrong. There are over 100 strains of HPV. Two of them cause 70% of cervical cancers, two of them cause 90% of genital warts, the HPV vaccine protects against those four.

      October 15, 2012 at 12:43 | Report abuse |
  10. Common Sense

    The vaccine is banned in England for causing deaths

    October 15, 2012 at 11:02 | Report abuse | Reply
    • TomM

      Untrue. Please cite your source

      October 15, 2012 at 11:26 | Report abuse |
    • nurse

      Please do not spread misinformation like this. Wholly untrue.

      October 15, 2012 at 11:31 | Report abuse |
    • Shannon

      That is not true. Currently the UK recommends the vaccine for girls. It is currently not approved for the use in boys in the UK.

      October 15, 2012 at 11:37 | Report abuse |
    • Lookitup

      Cite – June12, 2012: dailymail.co.

      "Scientific evidence does not support rolling out vaccines against the Human Papilloma Virus (HPV) in the general population, British researchers have warned India. HPV is linked to cervical cancer...
      Pending a final decision, the vaccines are being aggressively promoted through doctors, social media and publicity campaigns by drug companies – GSK and Merck...
      It was involved in clinical trials of the vaccine ... but the project was stopped following the death of four girls after vaccination"

      Read more: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/indiahome/indianews/article-2162834/Warning-bells-HPV-vaccines.html#ixzz29NvU9j6C

      October 15, 2012 at 12:16 | Report abuse |
    • Mark

      While the article in question does state that 4 girls died, this study was done in India, not the UK. The cause of death for the four girls was not given however, so you cannot draw a conclusion that it was from the vaccination. If 10,000 girls were vaccinated and only 4 died from the vaccine (if that could be proven), then that is a rate of 0.04%, actually a very low complication rate. We do not know if these four girls were already sick, perhaps the person who gave the injection used bad technique and they got an infection from getting a needle stick. There is simply to little information to pass judgement. HPV is a serious problem and vaccination is effective in the US at least with a low rate of complications. The reaction to vaccination may be different in India and other countries, you cannot assume that conditions are the same everywhere.

      October 15, 2012 at 13:46 | Report abuse |
  11. Cindy

    My problem has never been with the vaccine, but rather the way the vaccine was introduced. It was manadated in Texas by the Governor that every female child (and only the females) must have it. This was done because Governor Perry's former Chief of Staff had become the Merck lobbyist and Merck was funneling huge funds into Perry's campaign accounts. When I realized our little girls (and only our little girls) were sold out medically to Merck for political gain, I was furious. I felt that it branded women as the cause of the disease spread, I felt it was disgusting to sell our little girls, and I was disguted at Merck for being so awful as to make this arrangement. I'm glad it blew up in their face and embarrased everyone. They should all be ashamed. The real shame, though, is that what may actually be a good drug can't get a fair shake because all the politicians and drug manufacturers are so corrupt.

    October 15, 2012 at 11:06 | Report abuse | Reply
    • WV Gleeman

      Do you feel the same way about smallpox? It's mandated the same. Also, I'm sure there is a drug company that makes money off it and I'd be willing to bet that some official has a friend on the board or works as a lobbyist for them as well. The health of your children should trump the fact you don't like how it was mandated.

      October 15, 2012 at 11:45 | Report abuse |
    • Richard Alexander

      I was taking a dual-study college class in Humanities & Government ("Debating Politics," I think was the name) in Texas when Gov. Perry passed the law requiring girls to receive the Merck HPV shot. Of course, we debated this in class, and I took the opposing side. I have always felt it outrageous that the government would mandate a new drug (no track record for performance or safety outside the drug maker's own tests), particularly when safe methods exist to achieve the same affect. It was around that same time (maybe a week before our scheduled debate on the topic) that 3 people died from the vaccine.

      @WV Gleeman: Smallpox and its vaccine are not equivalent to HPV and its vaccine. Smallpox can spread like wildfire, infecting virtually everyone in a community with only casual contact & causing a high death rate. HPV requires much more intimate contact, has a lower transmission rate & a lower death rate. All vaccines carry risks, but the risk of HPV vaccine may be higher than for smallpox vaccine. Finally, we don't have the financial conflict of interest between government officials & drug companies in the smallpox instance that we had in the HPV instance.

      October 15, 2012 at 12:35 | Report abuse |
    • Roger

      @Richard, Roughly 50% of the population in the US has HPV. It many cases it is spread without any foreknowledge. The infected perosn (especially males) have ZERO symptoms. It is a plague on our society and the cost is huge.

      Outside developed countries where pap smears are common, Cerivcal cancer is usually sites as the 2nd most deadly amongst women. Even in the US the secondary costs for treatment of per-cancerous lesions in women is huge.

      The issue at hand is that people are (rightfully) distrustful of pharma companies with profit motives dictating vaccine value. But that is the healthcare system we currently have in place and there is little we can do to fix it at this time. So you have to look at the scientific studies and weigh the potential risk of the vaccine against the cost to society without them.

      IMO the vaccine is worth it, and when my son is eligible he will receive it.

      October 15, 2012 at 12:55 | Report abuse |
    • swishiness

      Richard, safe methods don't exist to achieve the same effect, HPV is spread via skin to skin contact, and if you have had sex with one person you are at risk. In order to protect against it you might suggest staying abstinent forever?

      October 15, 2012 at 12:55 | Report abuse |
    • thesaj

      If the vaccine is so important, and such a wonder...and worthy of mandating to children?

      How come my wife and I can't get it? Because I'm male, and she's one year too old. Even though she is far more unlikely to be infected than the average teenager today having only been with one partner.

      October 15, 2012 at 14:15 | Report abuse |
    • Steve

      the obvios answer to your question thesaj is because the manufactures have not demonstrated that the vaccine is able to significantly reduce occurrences of the virus in men and women over the age of 26 (assuming that you are). Without said scientifically verifiable data then the product won't be licensed in use for individuals over that age range.

      October 15, 2012 at 15:51 | Report abuse |
  12. Carina

    I have a 12 year old daughter and I guess in some cases like mine, the question is not whether her sexual life will start earlier because of it. I've talked to different moms and the concern we all share is the safety of the vaccine in terms of possible side effects and long term effects. I've always have her vaccinated against other illnesses, but in this case I think more information would help a lot.

    October 15, 2012 at 11:08 | Report abuse | Reply
    • KT

      There is a plethora of information out there. Use the internet, call your doctor, talk to the nurse, ask a pharmacist. It is your fault you are ignorant on the matter.

      October 15, 2012 at 18:42 | Report abuse |
  13. truth

    I've been to enough college campuses to have my own observations:
    Abortions are used as a means of birth control. Women are scamming the (stupid) system by saying the pill is for 'acne' or 'irregular periods' all day long. And trust me, people WILL engage in risky behavior knowing they have had this shot. I know this study is perhaps accurate...for girls up to age 15...who very well might be less than honest...as it will help sell more of the drug. The fact they needed this study is ridiculous.

    However, believe me the majority of girls getting this are not getting it because their parents think they'll be raped. It is cause they know oral promiscuity is RAMPANT and that is a vector for HPV. Call it what it is. Educate, and accept this is reality.

    October 15, 2012 at 11:25 | Report abuse | Reply
    • WV Gleeman

      That RAMPANT oral issue you are talking about is over 5 years old and is now not RAMPANT like you say. New studies have found that oral sex among young teens has DRAMATICALLY declined.

      October 15, 2012 at 11:37 | Report abuse |
    • MadHatter

      So, you're anti-abortion and anti-birth control pill? I suppose you're one of those nuts that thinks women should remain pure as the driven snow til marriage and men can stick their wick wherever they so please. I don't like that fact that you seem to want to have input in my sex life.

      And for the record – I did use the pill to clear up my acne. Hormones make me break out.

      October 15, 2012 at 12:09 | Report abuse |
  14. earthshoes44

    My problem with this vaccine is that they are encouraging everyone to get it without spelling out all the side effects (which they continue to gloss over or insist are caused by something else) and they are not quick to volunteer that it only covers a portion of the HPVs responsible for cervical cancer. The government and vaccine makers are inclined to treat the public like they're five year olds–giving them only the big picture benefits instead of being clear about the cons as well as the pros. This is why the public is so distrustful and will remain this way until they're treated like an equal partner in their own health care as well as that of their children.

    October 15, 2012 at 11:27 | Report abuse | Reply
    • WV Gleeman

      Really? A simple search shows the side effects on the CDC website. Hopefully they are official enough for you unless they are part of the global liberal conspiracy to get all your children pregnant or infected.
      Life-threatening allergic reactions from vaccines are very rare. If they do occur, it would be within a few minutes to a few hours after the vaccination.

      Several mild to moderate problems are known to occur with this HPV vaccine. These do not last long and go away on their own.

      Reactions in the arm where the shot was given:
      Pain (about 8 people in 10)
      Redness or swelling (about 1 person in 4)
      Fever:
      Mild (100° F) (about 1 person in 10)
      Moderate (102° F) (about 1 person in 65)
      Other problems
      Headache (about 1 person in 3)
      Fainting. Brief fainting spells and related symptoms (such as jerking movements) can happen after any medical procedure, including vaccination. Sitting or lying down for about 15 minutes after a vaccination can help prevent fainting and injuries caused by falls. Tell your doctor if the
      patient feels dizzy or light-headed, or has vision changes or ringing in the ears.

      October 15, 2012 at 11:42 | Report abuse |
    • Teri

      WV – if you think they are telling you 100% of the potential problems, both immediate and long-term, you are as naive as the day is long.

      October 15, 2012 at 12:09 | Report abuse |
    • NotCompletelySafeForEveryone

      This just came out: Premature ovarian failure 3 years after menarche in a 16-year-old girl following human papillomavirus vaccination

      See: http://casereports.bmj.com/content/2012/bcr-2012-006879.abstract

      October 15, 2012 at 12:09 | Report abuse |
    • rosie

      Having dealt with the American public for years I can confirm that most of them ARE 5 year children, mentally and educationally.

      October 15, 2012 at 15:42 | Report abuse |
  15. cc

    To everybody (except the religious, I guess) it's been known for years that kids who want to have sex will have sex regardless of the risks. Since kids are risk-insensitive I don't find it surprising that reducing the risks doesn't increase the likelihood. They will or they won't depending on what they believe-and that's the only thing that makes a difference, I think.

    October 15, 2012 at 11:30 | Report abuse | Reply
  16. ArthurP

    And then there is this study:

    Premarital Abstinence Pledges Ineffective, Study Finds

    "Teenagers who pledge to remain virgins until marriage are just as likely to have premarital sex as those who do not promise abstinence and are significantly less likely to use condoms and other forms of birth control when they do, according to a study released today. "

    http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2008/12/28/AR2008122801588.html

    October 15, 2012 at 11:32 | Report abuse | Reply
  17. ArthurP

    I wonder if Bristol Palin go the shot??

    October 15, 2012 at 11:33 | Report abuse | Reply
  18. Teri

    Has less to do with giving the kids a green light to have sex than it does with not wanting our girls to be guinea pigs for the pharmaceutical industry. Sorry, but mine has not had the shot and will not get it. None of my friends have allowed their girls to have it. My doctor won't even allow his daughter to have it.

    October 15, 2012 at 12:08 | Report abuse | Reply
    • Lookitup

      THank you for posting this ... People need to see and hear both sides!

      October 15, 2012 at 12:18 | Report abuse |
    • swishiness

      If your daughter should read into it herself and discover that she is at risk for HPV if she even has sex with one person, let her know she can have the shot until she is 26! That's true for any male partners she may have as well.

      October 15, 2012 at 12:58 | Report abuse |
    • Teri

      Agreed Swishiness. She just turned 12, so we have many more years that it will be open to her. It's just too new on the market for me to risk it with her right now. In 8-10 years, if she so chooses to have it, then I can't stop her. But, that will be a decision I'll leave up to her.

      October 15, 2012 at 13:01 | Report abuse |
    • mdanger

      Teri-
      I received this in 2007 when I was 21 years old. I was one of the first people I knew who got it, following my lead every female i know who was of eligible age received the vaccination and none had adverse effects. Also "Too new on the market" is a pretty relative term. Considering it's been available to the general public for a full 6 years and prior to that underwent about 8-10 years of clinical trials i think it's safe to say that it's been around for a minimum of 14 years..Any 'long term' effects would be extremely rare statistically speaking.

      October 15, 2012 at 14:08 | Report abuse |
    • Rene

      If this were a vaccine for breast, lung or skin cancer, people wwould be lined up around the corner for their kids to get it. But because it's for a STD, it taps into the unrealistic fear that our kids will some day be sexually active. I think it's unfortunate that people would deprive their child of a potentially life-saving vaccine because they're picturing how their kids might get the STD. I use the example that a girl could be virtuous and a virgin until her wedding night, but that won't protect her if her husband has HPV and unknowinly passes it to her. It's not about promiscuity, but protection.

      October 15, 2012 at 14:25 | Report abuse |
  19. Stefan

    Has anyone bothered to point out that there are some serious problems with this research? Namely that you can't conclude the HPV vaccine doesn't cause "increased sexual activity" when they didn't actually measure the amount of sexual activity being undertaken by the vaccine recipients. They measured pregnancies and STDs and counseling sessions. So we know that getting the HPV vaccine isn't associate with those.

    Also, there are probably some fundamental differences between girls that do and don't get the vaccine. Like, perhaps, parents who are more concerned about their daughters' general health and well-being. That might also have an impact on their odds of getting pregnant, for example. How do simple concepts like this get overlooked in the article?

    October 15, 2012 at 12:37 | Report abuse | Reply
  20. Richard Alexander

    In my experience, the primary concern is not that girls may become promiscuous after receiving this shot, but that they may die as a consequence of receiving this shot. All vaccines carry some risk. One has to balance the risk from HPV verses the risk from the vaccine. It seems likely that many people don't consider the risks from HPV to be high enough to justify the health risk and expense associated with the vaccine.

    October 15, 2012 at 12:41 | Report abuse | Reply
  21. mrsjs15

    "By 2010, fewer than half of girls eligible for the vaccine had received even one dose....Investigators believe that may be in part because some people who oppose the vaccine wrongly believe that it also protects against pregnancy and other sexually transmitted diseases"

    Or – OR – we dont want our daughters to be guinea pigs for big Pharma.... lest we forget quite a few other vaccines and medications where a generation later companies shrugged and said "My bad"....

    October 15, 2012 at 13:23 | Report abuse | Reply
  22. Molly

    While it may not increase/encourage sexual activity (which I don't think was an overwhelming concern anyway), I wonder if it increases the chances of engaging in unprotected and risky sexual activity. Maybe that is what they should have been studying instead. Just a thought.

    October 15, 2012 at 13:24 | Report abuse | Reply
  23. I have HPV

    I had genital warts 2 years ago and had the warts removed surgically. Havent had any more since. I believe I am cured of HPV. Is this correct or do I need to take the vaccine too?

    October 15, 2012 at 13:39 | Report abuse | Reply
    • No Cure

      There is no cure for HPV. Once you have it, you have it for life and it can reoccur and you can transmit it to other people without having obvious symptoms.

      Getting the vaccine after you have HPV will not cure HPV. You should NOT get the vaccine if you already have HPV. It only helps prevent you from getting it in the first place.

      October 15, 2012 at 14:21 | Report abuse |
    • ok

      @nocure – actually, according to the CDC website, "in 90% of cases, the body's immune system clears HPV naturally within 2 years." check the facts before you tell someone they have an incurable disease.

      October 15, 2012 at 14:48 | Report abuse |
    • I have HPV

      Thanks ! Yes, I have not had any more warts or symptoms of any sort in the last 2 years. I would have killed myself if I had an incurable disease so thank you Mr Ok.

      October 15, 2012 at 15:00 | Report abuse |
    • I have HPV

      So Just to be clear, I cannot pass this on to anyone if I have not had any symptoms for 2 years correct? I am cured of HPV ??

      October 15, 2012 at 15:03 | Report abuse |
    • I have HPV

      Based on Ok's response, should I get the HPV vaccine if I am cured of HPV ?

      October 15, 2012 at 15:08 | Report abuse |
    • JavierP

      Just to Clarify:
      The statement regarding the your body's ability to clear infection spontaneously after several years is accurate. However, that does not mean you should not get the vaccine or that you are ineligible to get it. Remember that the vaccine protects you against HPV serotypes 8, 11, 16 and 18. Having been exposed only protects you against the serotype you were exposed to. You may still acquire protection against the other three types by getting vaccinated.

      October 16, 2012 at 10:37 | Report abuse |
  24. Donna

    Can someone please tell me why in the hell anyone would think this shot series would encourage sex? I mean how stupid can people really be? My 15 year old had the shots 3 years ago. Guess what? She's still not sexually active! Get a grip people. Why did we even need a study in this? Protect your daughters!

    October 15, 2012 at 13:44 | Report abuse | Reply
  25. momzna

    This whole issue is ridiculous. Do you know what else does encourage sexual activity? – Hygiene! A person with clean healthy teeth is more sexually attractive than a person with rotten teeth and filthy mouth. The use of soap encourages sexual activity, for a clean, nice smelling person is more sexually attractive. A healthy person is more sexually attractive and active. Following the logic of "conservatives" regarding that vaccine, people shouldn't teach their children to brush their teeth, take shower and change underwear. Those people are not conservatives, they are morons. Vaccines prevent diseases, end of story.

    October 15, 2012 at 14:05 | Report abuse | Reply
  26. ChristopherM

    There is no such thing as global warming, evolution is a hoax, the Earth is only 6,000 years old, vaccines cause girls to have sex before marriage, the president's birth certificate is a fake, the unemployment numbers were rigged...conservatives get nuttier and less reasonable by the day.

    October 15, 2012 at 14:32 | Report abuse | Reply
    • rasko41

      ... and when I get to Heaven-III I'll get to be a demigod and run my own planet.

      October 15, 2012 at 14:44 | Report abuse |
  27. rasko41

    I was worried that my kids might play in the street even though I tell them not to. We had the speed limit raised from 25 to 50. Now the street is much more dangerous, so my kids are afraid to play there, and we all feel safer.

    October 15, 2012 at 14:43 | Report abuse | Reply
  28. Lerxst

    Google 'Dr Hook Dr Handsfield HPV cancer'. These 2 doctors are premier, repsected STD specialists in the USA, and they have very interesting things to say about the HPV scare in this country. A must read if you take the time to read their viewpoints.

    October 15, 2012 at 15:06 | Report abuse | Reply
  29. rosie

    The thing with vaccinations is that they can work differently with all of us. Some people may in fact get a reaction to the injected material that no one else does. ALL drugs are like that.

    October 15, 2012 at 15:43 | Report abuse | Reply
  30. Reemo

    It's completely absurd the extent opponents to the HPV vaccine will go to fight this. I guess they oppose finding a cure for AIDS too. I can already hear the mob, "If you cure AIDS, well then ever'body be havin' all kinds of crazy sex!"

    October 15, 2012 at 16:43 | Report abuse | Reply
  31. WAKEUP48

    Gardasil is responsible for causing anaphylactic shock, foaming at the mouth, grand mal convulsions, coma, and paralyzation, among other things. Despite being linked to numerous deaths and countless side-effects, the safety of the vaccine has largely gone uncontested and continues to ride a wave of false media hype. As they continue to push Merck’s vaccine as a solution – to a problem that has a 90% chance to resolve itself within two years and 70% within one year – they increasingly reveal their true profit and eugenics driven agendas. One has to wonder exactly who these governments think they’re fooling.

    October 15, 2012 at 22:11 | Report abuse | Reply
    • drcub1908

      EXACTLY

      October 16, 2012 at 08:54 | Report abuse |
  32. WAKEUP48

    Here are some facts:

    - According to the FDA’s own website, the vaccine was only tested on approximately 21,000 girls and women before pushed on millions of children, teens, and adults around the world.

    - The FDA’s site never mentions that any studies were ever conducted on men, however the CDC recommends the vaccine for “all teen boys and men through age 21.”

    - The CDC’s own website admits that “In 90% of cases, the body’s immune system clears HPV naturally within two years.“

    - The drug was “fast-tracked” to the market, meaning the FDA granted approval in 6 months, bypassing the usual four year waiting period.

    - The drug is hailed as a cervical cancer prevention drug, when in actuality “No one has determined whether or not persistent [HPV] infections actually cause cancer without other risk factors being present.”

    October 15, 2012 at 22:13 | Report abuse | Reply
  33. WAKEUP48

    In short, this supposed vaccine is more dangerous than the disease it claims to address. It resembles a bioweapon more than a preventive vaccine.

    October 15, 2012 at 22:16 | Report abuse | Reply
  34. mike

    Man, you americans have to be the dumbest people of all the 1st world countries. How on earth you became no.1 with the sheer amount of retards you have is shocking.

    Truly, America: land of the dumb.

    October 15, 2012 at 23:39 | Report abuse | Reply
    • WAKEUP48

      That has been the plan for a lonnnng time

      October 15, 2012 at 23:50 | Report abuse |
    • drcub1908

      Mike...YOU ARE SO CORRECT

      October 16, 2012 at 08:52 | Report abuse |
    • MCR

      No. 1 in what exactly?

      That said, people everywhere have stupidities of their own. In the US people are stupid about sex and guns. But in Europe people believe all manner of unproven naturopathic health remedies, even funding them with tax dollars. In China people hypocritically believe in Chi (offering thevidence most 10 year olds could see through) while ridiculing the religiosity of the west. Stupidity is pretty equal opportunity.

      October 17, 2012 at 08:45 | Report abuse |
  35. drcub1908

    The HPV Vaccine Risks You're Not Being Told About

    As of August 13, 2012, VAERS has received 119 reports of death following HPV vaccination,4 as well as:

    894 reports of disability
    517 life-threatening adverse events
    9,889 emergency room visits
    2,781 hospitalizations

    October 16, 2012 at 08:51 | Report abuse | Reply
  36. WAKEUP48

    CNN puts this Sunjay Gupta on every health topic like they were pushing a movie... IF YOU WANT REAL HEALTH NEWS, ARTICLES, AND SOMEONE WHO REALLLLLLY WANTS TO HELP YOU LOOK NO FURTHER THEN DR. MERCOLA

    October 16, 2012 at 11:18 | Report abuse | Reply
  37. MCR

    I think young people are more educated about what HPV is because of this test. 15 years ago most women didn't even realize that the PAP test results indicated infection with an STD, and doctors were hesitant to tell them because of the life changing nature of a positive result. So many women, even with abnormal results, were walking around not fully understaning that they'd been infected with an STD.

    October 17, 2012 at 08:41 | Report abuse | Reply
  38. Mead

    Way to go Dr. Bob! Proud of you.

    October 17, 2012 at 12:29 | Report abuse | Reply
  39. Mom of 3 girls

    this is crazy, i mean really my girls just think of it as another shot they need to get just like chicken poxs and all the others they have received.

    October 17, 2012 at 16:25 | Report abuse | Reply
  40. readthefineprint

    HPV vaccine is not safe. Parents and potential recipients should go to VAERS and searchthe database of all of the adverse reactions with regard to this vaccine.

    October 17, 2012 at 16:35 | Report abuse | Reply
  41. PillTablets

    http://www.pilltablets.com The more safe, secure and reliable pharmacy online. Offering you outstanding prices for any of your medical needs. At pilltablets.com you'll receive discreet, no cost medical consultations with state licensed doctors and pharmacists. We have Tramadol, Fioricet, Rozerem Sold without prescription. 100% US Medicines, FDA approved and best of all COD payments accepted. Satisfaction Guaranteed!

    October 18, 2012 at 09:23 | Report abuse | Reply
  42. Vanessa

    My daughters both got the shot. Showed them everything I could find on stds HIV ect.

    October 19, 2012 at 01:28 | Report abuse | Reply

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Get a behind-the-scenes look at the latest stories from CNN Chief Medical Correspondent, Dr. Sanjay Gupta, Senior Medical Correspondent Elizabeth Cohen and the CNN Medical Unit producers. They'll share news and views on health and medical trends - info that will help you take better care of yourself and the people you love.