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Prognosis favorable for Colts coach with leukemia
Chuck Pagano's doctors say they are confident he will beat his cancer.
October 1st, 2012
07:47 PM ET

Prognosis favorable for Colts coach with leukemia

Chuck Pagano is only the second head coach in recent NFL history to be diagnosed with cancer during the season, according to Indianapolis Colts Owner Jim Irsay.

Pagano was hospitalized Wednesday night and immediately began treatment after being diagnosed with "acute promyelocytic leukemia," a subtype of acute myeloid leukemia, "which is a cancer of the bone marrow tissue," according to his physician Dr. Larry Cripe, a leukemia expert from the Indiana University School of Medicine.

Here are a few things to know about leukemia and specifically acute promyelocytic leukemia or APL:

How common is APL?
Each year, more than 40,800 adults and 3,500 children are diagnosed with all kinds of blood and bone marrow cancer called leukemia, according to the National Cancer Institute. About 13,780 of these new cases will be adults diagnosed with acute myeloid leukemia (AML). FULL POST


Study: Doctors should share notes with you
Doctors' notes can help patients understand why it's important to take their medications, a new study found.
October 1st, 2012
05:00 PM ET

Study: Doctors should share notes with you

After you leave your doctor's office, there's a crucial part of the appointment that happens behind your back: Your doctor writes a note describing how the visit went.

The note might say that your blood pressure is higher or better, or that you seem more or less stressed than previously. It may mention any prescriptions you're supposed to take and why, and when you'll be back for a follow-up.

A new study in the journal Annals of Internal Medicine recommends giving patients access to those notes.

FULL POST


Study finds HPV vaccine is safe
October 1st, 2012
04:49 PM ET

Study finds HPV vaccine is safe

A vaccine against human papillomavirus, commonly known as HPV, a virus known to cause genital warts and cervical cancer, is safe, according to a study of almost 200,000 girls who received the vaccine.

Concerns over the safety of the Gardasil vaccine emerged shortly after the Food and Drug Administration approved it in 2006, despite  the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, the American Academy of Pediatrics and the American Academy of Family Physicians all deeming the vaccine safe and recommending it be given to girls ages 11 and 12.

Dr. Nicola Klein, pediatrician and lead author of the study published Monday in the Archives of Pediatrics & Adolescent Medicine, says she hopes the study puts those rumors to rest. FULL POST


Poor sleep and sleep habits in adolescence may raise health risks
Sleep disturbances in adolescence may lead to high cholesterol, high blood pressure and being overweight later in life.
October 1st, 2012
12:20 PM ET

Poor sleep and sleep habits in adolescence may raise health risks

Lack of quality sleep for adults may negatively impact heart health. Evidence now suggests that sleep problems during adolescence may increase health risks as well.

The research appeared Monday in the Canadian Medical Association Journal.

"When most people think about cardiovascular risk factors and risk behaviors, they don't necessarily think of sleep," said Dr. Brian McCrindle, senior author and cardiologist at SickKids in Toronto, Ontario. "This study ... shows a clear association between sleep disturbance (in adolescents) and a greater likelihood of having high cholesterol, high blood pressure and being overweight or obese." FULL POST


Celebrating 100 years of surgery
The ACS anniversary timeline can be found online at FACS.org.
October 1st, 2012
09:56 AM ET

Celebrating 100 years of surgery

When the American College of Surgeons was formed in 1913, "infection rates were high, blood supplies were almost non-existent, tools were fairly crude, standards were lax, and patients were rightfully scared," according to an announcement of the organization's 100th anniversary.

Since then, surgery has made significant strides - many of which are shown in the interactive timeline launched by ACS this week in celebration of the centennial milestone.

The ACS was founded to improve the quality of care for surgical patients by setting better standards for education and practices, says president-elect Dr. Brent Eastman.  More than 78,000 surgeons worldwide are members of the professional group.

From the first blood bank opening in Chicago in 1937 to the first complete face transplant surgery in Boston in 2011, the ACS has been at the forefront of many medical breakthroughs.  But Eastman and the ACS fellows aren't dwelling on the past; even as they celebrate their history, they're looking to the future.
FULL POST


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About this blog

Get a behind-the-scenes look at the latest stories from CNN Chief Medical Correspondent, Dr. Sanjay Gupta, Senior Medical Correspondent Elizabeth Cohen and the CNN Medical Unit producers. They'll share news and views on health and medical trends - info that will help you take better care of yourself and the people you love.

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