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Pregnant and just start snoring? You may have hypertension
September 26th, 2012
12:24 PM ET

Pregnant and just start snoring? You may have hypertension

If you're pregnant and you (or your other half) notice you've started to snore, you might want to talk to your doctor.  You could be at greater risk of getting high blood pressure and preeclampsia, according to a new study in the American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology.

Preeclampsia, left untreated, can be life-threatening to the mother and unborn child.  It usually starts after the fifth month of pregnancy and causes a pregnant woman's blood pressure to go up and the presence of protein in the mother's urine.  This can significantly affect the placenta and the mother's liver, kidney and brain.

Preeclampsia can cause seizures and is the second leading cause of death in pregnant women in the United States. It's also a leading cause of fetal complications including premature birth, low birth weight and stillbirth.  There is no cure short of delivering the baby.

The study, conducted by the University of Michigan, was the largest of its kind and the first to show that women who begin snoring after they become pregnant have a greater risk of getting high blood pressure and face significant risk to their cardiovascular health, says lead author Louise O'Brien, an associate professor at the University of Michigan's Sleep Disorders Center.

"What we found was that snoring during pregnancy was indeed strongly associated with gestational hypertension and preeclampsia," O'Brien told CNN. "That was after we had accounted for other known risk factors. What was a novelty about this study was that we looked at women who have been snoring before they got pregnant and women who developed snoring during their pregnancy.  It was actually the women who started snoring after they became pregnant that were at highest risk of high blood pressure problems."

More than 1,700 pregnant women participated in the study.  They were recruited in their last trimester - 28 weeks and up.  O'Brien says 25% of them started snoring frequently once pregnant, doubling their risk of high blood pressure compared to women who don't snore.  Nine percent reported chronic snoring.

Chronic snoring - snoring three to four nights a week - is an indication of a sleep disorder.  O'Brien says these women can be treated for "sleep disordered breathing" by using a continuous positive airway pressure machine, or CPAP.  The machine is worn during sleep and pushes out mild air pressure to help keep the person's airways open.

O'Brien has a new study underway to determine whether using a CPAP decreases hypertension in pregnant women.  But she says while more than one-third of these pregnant women were snoring by their last trimester, not all of them will have sleep apnea.  There are a number of things pregnant women can and should do.

'Women should mention frequent snoring to their doctor," O'Brien said. "The problem is many women don't mention sleep problems to their obstetrician and conversely obstetricians don't ask their patients about sleep problems either."

O'Brien reminds expectant mothers that how you sleep is also important.  Snoring is much more common when people lay on their back, which most pregnant women don't do.  For pregnant women, side sleeping is better - preferably the left side, she says, because the weight of the uterus presses down on some of the vessels that bring the blood back to the lungs.

Her message for physicians? "If they have a patient who has gestational hypertension or preeclampsia and they ask them if they snore frequently and the answer is yes, those are the patients who may benefit from a more thorough sleep apnea workup."

The takeaway of this study is simple, says O'Brien: "If we can highlight the importance of snoring in pregnant women and we can encourage obstetricians to ask their patients about snoring, it is important not just to ask at the initial visit but also continue to ask as the pregnancy progresses.  I think this study also reinforces the fact that we need to look at treatment intervention trials to see if we can improve maternal hypertension by treating any underlying sleep apnea."


soundoff (11 Responses)
  1. Eli2003

    I snored once I became pregnant and I developed preeclampsia at 37 weeks. I had to undergo an unexpected c-section after 20 hours of induction labor and no baby coming out. Luckily my daughter was born safetly and I didn't have any complications after the birth either. Though, the swelling and blood pressure raising was phenomenal. I did not know I could swell so much!

    September 27, 2012 at 09:57 | Report abuse | Reply
  2. Nicky

    I snored during both my pregnancies and never had any issues with blood pressure, pre-eclampsia or hypertension. Once the babies were out the snoring stopped as well..

    September 27, 2012 at 11:42 | Report abuse | Reply
  3. Sarah

    I also began snoring during both of my pregnancies. I developed high blood pressure which then lead to preeclampsia with my first son and high blood pressure with my second. I delivered both early via c-section. It happened about the same time with both pregnancies at about 35 weeks.

    September 28, 2012 at 12:52 | Report abuse | Reply
  4. amber

    yep, this happened to me exactly. my son is fine though.

    October 1, 2012 at 01:31 | Report abuse | Reply
  5. shaun

    Many women's suffer from snoring during pregnency.their blood pressure level will be increase and snore at night.take some remedies to get back from snoring like sleep on a side rather than sleep on a back.use some anti snoring devices to get back from snoring.anti snoring mouthpiece helps to control snoring.

    November 15, 2012 at 02:20 | Report abuse | Reply
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    April 21, 2013 at 07:11 | Report abuse | Reply
  8. Elmer Garns

    As many as half of adults snore sometimes. Snoring occurs when air flows past relaxed tissues in your throat, causing the tissues to vibrate as you breathe, which creates those irritating sounds.-,.;

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    July 5, 2013 at 00:26 | Report abuse | Reply
  9. Stop Snoring After Drinking Alcohol
    September 27, 2013 at 08:17 | Report abuse | Reply
  10. Ferry

    Snoring can be very dangerous for health. It's better to use anti-snoring products for being in a healthy state. You readout a blog at http://whydopeoplesnore.bl.admir.is/attenuate-snoring-brookstone/ to know how to tackle with it.

    October 19, 2013 at 07:33 | Report abuse | Reply
  11. stella_far

    Snore can mean many things about our health. It could be serious or just a throat problem. It is best to know the cause of snoring before it's too late realize it could be something serious.

    February 28, 2014 at 13:50 | Report abuse | Reply

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