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September 18th, 2012
03:52 PM ET

Astronaut marks first triathlon in space

The CNN Fit Nation Lucky 7 get major props for finishing the Nautica Malibu Triathlon this weekend, and so does NASA astronaut Sunita Williams.

Williams did the swimming, biking and running events aboard the International Space Station using exercise equipment specialized for space.  This makes her the first person ever to complete a triathlon in space.

“I’m happy to be done," she said after finishing her activities. "It wasn’t easy, and I’m sure everyone out in California is excited to be done, too.”

She said via NASA TV that her watch said it took her 1:48:43 for the three events and the transitions, although getting from one activity to another is a little different in space than for Earthlings.

Williams used the onboard stationary bicycle for biking and the space station's treadmill for running. There's no pool on the station, however, so she used a simulated weight-lifting system.

After finishing, Williams gave a shout out to CNN's Dr. Sanjay Gupta "who is really interested in health and fitness," she said.

Williams is currently the International Space Station Commander for the Expedition 33 crew.


Chemical BPA linked to children's obesity
BPA is used as an anti-corrosive in aluminum cans and is used to manufacture some plastics.
September 18th, 2012
03:24 PM ET

Chemical BPA linked to children's obesity

The chemical bisphenol-A, or BPA, has a long and controversial history.

Used to manufacture some plastics – like the kinds in soda or water bottles – and as an anti-corrosive in aluminum cans, BPA has been under fire for some time from consumer advocacy groups.

The FDA recently banned BPA in baby bottles and sippy cups after concerns were raised about potential side effects on the “brain, behavior, and prostate gland in fetuses, infants, and young children,” according to the FDA website.

Still, the organization has stood by the overall safety of the chemical; in March the FDA denied the Natural Resources Defense Council’s petition to ban BPA outright.

Now a new study published this week in the Journal of the American Medical Association is adding more fuel to the flames.  The paper shows an association between BPA levels in children’s urine and obesity prevalence.
FULL POST


SimplyThick a risk to all infants, FDA cautions
A product used to help infants with difficulty swallowing could lead to a life-threatening condition, the FDA says.
September 18th, 2012
03:04 PM ET

SimplyThick a risk to all infants, FDA cautions

A product used to help infants with difficulty swallowing could increase their risk of developing a life-threatening illness, the Food and Drug Administration warned Tuesday.

The agency says 22 infants developed necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC) after being fed the thickening agent SimplyThick – reportedly as directed. Seven of them died.  Necrotizing enterocolitis is a condition where tissue in the intestines gets inflamed and dies.  It occurs most often in babies that are ill or born prematurely.  The cause is unknown.

SimplyThick is mixed with breast milk or infant formula to help babies swallow their food and keep it down without spitting it back up.  It's sold in individual packets or 64-ounce bottles that can be bought from local pharmacies or distributors across the country.
FULL POST


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About this blog

Get a behind-the-scenes look at the latest stories from CNN Chief Medical Correspondent, Dr. Sanjay Gupta, Senior Medical Correspondent Elizabeth Cohen and the CNN Medical Unit producers. They'll share news and views on health and medical trends - info that will help you take better care of yourself and the people you love.

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