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Getting children ready for flu season
Some children may need two flu shots this year, depending on their age and when they received last year's vaccine.
September 10th, 2012
11:28 AM ET

Getting children ready for flu season

Flu season has officially started and although most influenza cases don’t begin to pop up till late October, doctors say September is a perfect time to get vaccinated. And that includes getting shots for your youngsters and teens.

This week, the American Academy of Pediatrics released its new guidelines on influenza and children. Although there are no major changes, the group stresses  it’s important for parents to talk to their child’s pediatrician about the vaccine.

Over the past few years, the Centers for Disease Control had recommended that children over the age of six months get either a traditional flu shot or a LAIV (live attenuated intranasal vaccine) sprayed in the nose, also known as FluMist. That has not changed. But because of the configuration of this year’s vaccine, the AAP is recommending parents be aware of how many shots their children should have.

Last year, in most cases, only one shot was recommended. This year may be different, depending on the age of the child and when that child received his or her flu shot last year.

Because the guidelines are a bit complicated, AAP along with the CDC suggests parents talk to their child’s doctor about the schedule. Some children, depending on when they received their shot last year, may need two vaccines while others will need only one. It’s important that parents keep a record of their children’s inoculations, so that proper dosages can be given each year.

Flu shots are already being offered in many clinics across the country. Many parents have asked if early September is too early to have their little ones vaccinated - and will they be protected all year? The CDC says if you or your child gets a vaccine now, the vaccine’s protection will last throughout the flu season, which usually peaks in January and ends in March.


soundoff (10 Responses)
  1. Ryan Cooper

    Getting children ready for this year`s flu season is probably one of the most important things a parent can do. Keeping up to date on your child’s dosages for flu vaccinations will help to dramatically reduce his or her susceptibility of acquiring the flu virus.

    However, in some cases a reactive therapy may be needed to help aid in cold and flu symptoms. This flu season make sure you read the fine print and ingredients on your favored over the counter pharmaceutical therapies because you may be surprised by the number of potentially harmful chemicals (i.e. petroleum jelly) that may be incorporated. Seeking out a pharmaceutical grade product that presents the same efficacy as the leading over-the-counter brands that is USDA certified organic (e.g. Maple Organics Jr. Cold & Flu) is an essential part to your cold and flu health kit.

    For more information: http://www.mapleorganics.com/products-page/baby/baby-toddler-jr-cold-flu-therapy/

    September 10, 2012 at 13:46 | Report abuse | Reply
  2. Angela

    I will never vaccinate my children! Ever! Why would anyone knowingly inject aluminum, formaldihyde, or mercury into an innocent child? Would you inject that knowingly into yourself? No wonder we have all these illnesses and SIDS!

    September 10, 2012 at 15:33 | Report abuse | Reply
    • Andrew

      you'd rather your child die of measles, mumps, rubella, flu, or another easily preventable disease? most vaccines no longer contain mercury anymore, and formaldehyde is so dilute that you probably get many times that amount in your daily food intake.

      September 10, 2012 at 17:44 | Report abuse |
    • John

      Good for you! If more so-called patriots would research these government programs they would never let their children be injected with toxins. By the way, humans have survived common diseases before the advent of the CDC. Just how do they so accurately predict the next flu strain each year when it takes six months to prepare vaccines? You don't suppose Big Brother knowingly decides each years' strain to benefit some agenda...?

      September 16, 2012 at 23:52 | Report abuse |
    • Melissa

      I love when people assume that deseases are vaccine preventable. Look at the whooping cough epidemic... 85% of the kids effected were vaccinated?!?!?!?!?!? If the vaccines were so effective.. what happened there???? BTW.. almost all of these so called "vaccine preventable" diseases do not kill your children. Yes it did have a devastating effect on children with low functioning immune systems and sometimes caused death in those children... but now we have traded those children's lives with the health of the overwhelming majority of the children by injecting them all with these nerotoxins! "For the greater good" my ass! You want complete immunity from the flu... get the flu naturally... same with chicken pox, whooping cough... measles, mumps.. rubella... the natural immunity will always be more effective and for most children non lethal. Instead we have rapid cases of ADHD, Immune deficiency, ashma, autism, obesity... our society is NOT healthier than we were 40 years ago... This systems does not work!!!

      October 22, 2012 at 11:33 | Report abuse |
  3. LN

    read this before getting any flu vaccine
    http://articles.mercola.com/sites/articles/archive/2012/09/11/h3n2-new-swine-flu.aspx?e_cid=20120911_DNL_artNew_1

    September 11, 2012 at 04:35 | Report abuse | Reply
  4. Nancy

    Only one vaccine is approved for children 6 months to 2 years–Fluzone vaccine. FluMist is approved for people 2 to 49 years old.

    September 17, 2012 at 15:55 | Report abuse | Reply
  5. janet

    They know what strains to use based on the strains that are currently circulating in the southern hemisphere. I am all for vaccines and get a flu vaccine yearly. Do not let fear mongers and the uninformed discourage you from protecting yourself and children from a very serious illness.

    September 24, 2012 at 14:48 | Report abuse | Reply
  6. Roger Pelizzari

    No Value in Any Influenza Vaccine: Cochrane Collaboration Study

    OCTOBER 5, 2012

    by Heidi Stevenson

    A remarkable study published in the Cochrane Library found no evidence of benefit for influenza vaccinations. It’s also damns the quality of flu vaccine studies by saying that the vast majority of trials were inadequate. The authors stated that the only ones showing benefit were industry-funded. They also pointed out that the industry-funded studies were more likely to be published in the most prestigious journals … and one more thing: They found cases of severe harm caused by the vaccines, in spite of inadequate reporting of adverse effects.

    The study, Vaccines for preventing influenza in healthy adults, is damning of the entire pharmaceutical industry and its minions: the drug testing industry and the medical system that both relies on and promotes them.
    In the usual scientific journal style of understatement, the authors concluded:

    The results of this review seem to discourage the utilisation of vaccination against influenza in healthy adults as a routine public health measure.

    Full article:
    http://gaia-health.com/gaia-blog/2012-10-05/no-value-in-any-influenza-vaccine-cochrane-collaboration-study/

    October 9, 2012 at 11:30 | Report abuse | Reply
  7. margaret

    i hate shots i would technally kick a shot out of your hand or bite someoe over a shot i would technall die before a needle

    October 24, 2012 at 11:33 | Report abuse | Reply

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