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PTSD strikes one in eight heart attack patients
June 20th, 2012
05:33 PM ET

PTSD strikes one in eight heart attack patients

PTSD – posttraumatic stress disorder – usually is associated with military personnel traumatized by combat or people who’ve been victimized by violent crime or sexual assaults.

But new study finds that one in eight patients develop PTSD after experiencing a heart attack or other major heart event. The study, published online in PLoS One, also reveals that heart patients who experience PTSD face double the risk for another heart event or dying within one to three years, compared to heart patients who do not experience PTSD.

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Senate votes in favor of clean air protections
June 20th, 2012
01:40 PM ET

Senate votes in favor of clean air protections

Senate Joint Resolution 37, the Senate bill that would overturn the Environmental Protection Agency's controversial Mercury and Air Toxics Standards or MATS, was voted down Wednesday by a margin of 46 to 53.

Introduced by Senator James Inhofe (R-OK) in February, the resolution was a challenge to the country's first national protections rule designed to limit the amount of heavy metals like mercury, arsenic, chromium, nickel and other toxic air pollutants released by power plants that burn coal and oil - toxins many suspect cause cancer and other health problems.

But Inhofe said the bill was specifically designed to kill the coal industry and the good paying jobs it provides. He led the charge to repeal the protections and vowed to keep fighting what he called the Obama administration's "damaging regulatory regime."
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June 20th, 2012
11:48 AM ET

'American Idol' favorite James Durbin overcomes Tourettes, Aspergers and bullying

Editor's note: In the Human Factor, we profile survivors who have overcome the odds. Confronting a life obstacle – injury, illness or other hardship – they tapped their inner strength and found resilience they didn't know they possessed.  James Durbin became a household name last year as the "American Idol" fan favorite who also has Tourette syndrome and Aspergers syndrome.  He also opens up about how music was not only a refuge from neurological disorders, but also years of bullying.

I believe it was December of '98 when my dad passed away of an overdose. A few weeks later, around my 10th birthday, I was diagnosed with Tourette syndrome and Asperger syndrome.

It was a really rough time, especially at that age, being told I have a neurological "disease," when I already felt so different.

At that point I was being bullied for being different, having big ears, and now for having no dad AND for making weird faces and noises I couldn't control.  I was a walking target.
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5 tips to survive extreme heat
A roofer in Walnut Creek, California, takes a break from the heat.
June 20th, 2012
10:05 AM ET

5 tips to survive extreme heat

Editor's note: This article was first published last summer on The Chart. We're republishing to share these important tips again with you.

The number of national heat advisories is rising almost as fast as the temperature. So we asked Ray Byrne, owner of America Roofing LLC, in Glendale, Arizona, who works outside in sometimes scorching weather, for his tips on how a heat pro deals with extreme temperatures.

Byrne – who has been working in the roofing business for nearly 25 years – said the average temperature in Glendale during the summer is about 115 degrees.

"Basically at 100 degrees, it's not too bad," he said. "At about 110 [degrees], you start feeling it, and at 120 [degrees], you start losing productivity."

The company holds monthly safety meetings on heatstroke and exhaustion to remind its staff of smart protocol.

Here are some strategies Byrne and his roofing employees use to stay cool. Adapt them to fit your needs whether you're outside all day or working in your garden for the afternoon.
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June 20th, 2012
06:00 AM ET

Report: Consumers demand drug-free meat

If you prefer your meat without antibiotics, you're not alone, according to a new study from Consumers Union – the group that publishes Consumer Reports magazine.

In a nationwide survey of more than a thousand people, Consumers Union found that 86% of people said they would like to see more antibiotic-free meat on store shelves, and more than 60% said they'd be willing to pay more for it.

"If we are going to tackle this problem, we have to reduce the use in animals," said Jean Halloran, the Director of Food Policy Initiatives at Consumers Union. "The government seems unable to take this step, so we're looking at the marketplace. It's supermarkets who stock these products, and consumers who buy them."

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Advocacy group: 26,000 die prematurely without health insurance
June 20th, 2012
12:01 AM ET

Advocacy group: 26,000 die prematurely without health insurance

A national health care consumer advocacy group estimates that three Americans die every hour as a result of not having health insurance.  

According to "Dying for Coverage," the latest report by Families USA, 72 Americans die each day, 500 Americans die every week and approximately Americans 2,175 die each month, due to lack of health insurance.

"The Affordable Care Act was passed by Congress to address an American tragedy and an American shame," said Ron Pollack, Executive Director Families USA. "The fact remains that for the millions of Americans without health coverage, only the Affordable Care offers the promise of access to affordable coverage and to a longer and healthier life." 

Families USA has been a staunch supporter of President Obama's health care reform law.
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About this blog

Get a behind-the-scenes look at the latest stories from CNN Chief Medical Correspondent, Dr. Sanjay Gupta, Senior Medical Correspondent Elizabeth Cohen and the CNN Medical Unit producers. They'll share news and views on health and medical trends - info that will help you take better care of yourself and the people you love.

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