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Report: Number of cancer cases worldwide could go up 75% by 2030
May 31st, 2012
07:43 PM ET

Report: Number of cancer cases worldwide could go up 75% by 2030

If current population trends continue, the number of people with cancer worldwide will go up to 22.2 million by 2030, up from 12.7 million in 2008, according to a study published in The Lancet on Thursday. Cases are expected to surge in poorer parts of the world, which are ill-equipped to handle the burden.

For the past few years, experts have been warning about the rising incidence of global cancer rates. In 2009, researchers were predicting cancer would overtake heart disease as the world's leading cause of death.

The new study, led by Dr. Freddie Bray of the International Agency for Research on Cancer, confirms that we're headed in the wrong direction when it comes to controlling cancer rates worldwide.

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CDC: Salmonella outbreak tied to live poultry
May 31st, 2012
05:18 PM ET

CDC: Salmonella outbreak tied to live poultry

You've probably heard a lot about salmonella in reference to food poisoning, but the latest outbreak isn't about eating cooked animals - it's about touching live ones.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention announced that 93 people in a total of 23 states have been infected with strains of salmonella: specifically, strains known as Salmonella Infantis, Salmonella Newport, and Salmonella Lille.  Of those affected, 18 patients have been hospitalized and one death may be related to the outbreak under investigation too.

A large portion - 37% - of the those infected are 10 years old or younger, according to the CDC.

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May 31st, 2012
11:18 AM ET

USDA to test for six more serious strains of E.coli

In an effort to reduce the risk of eating contaminated meat, the USDA will expand the search for dangerous bacteria.

Beginning next Monday, the U.S Department of Agriculture's Food Safety and Inspection services (FSIS) will begin testing ground beef for six additional strains of E.coli that are responsible for a number of serious illnesses in the United States.  If the meat is found to be contaminated, it will not be allowed to be sold and could be subject to a recall.

There are over 700 different strains of the bacteria E.coli. Although most of these types are harmless, there are those that can cause serious problems, by attacking the intestinal tract. Contracting certain forms of E.coli can lead to such problems as diarrhea, nausea, dehydration and in some severe cases, death.

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Consumers beware: Health care costs all over the map
May 31st, 2012
08:46 AM ET

Consumers beware: Health care costs all over the map

What you pay for medical procedures can vary drastically from city to city, hospital to hospital, even doctor to doctor - and there's not a whole lot you can do about it, according to a new report in Consumer Reports magazine.

Nancy Metcalf, the magazine's senior program editor and author of the article, says she was stunned by some of the numbers.

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Social media for two
Digital services are cropping up for couples to have their own private social networks.
May 31st, 2012
08:00 AM ET

Social media for two

Ian Kerner, a sexuality counselor and New York Times best-selling author, blogs about sex weekly on The Chart. Read more from him on his website, GoodInBed.

Facebook recently made headlines twice - first, when the company went public and again, when founder Mark Zuckerberg tied the knot. Although Facebook’s IPO was disappointing to those who had high expectations, we can hope at least that Zuckerberg’s marriage will soar, even if his stock did not.

One way the Zuckerbergs - and all couples - can help maintain a healthy connection with each other is to be cautious about the way they use Facebook and all social media, for that matter. As I’ve written before in this column, social networking tools can bring people together, but they can also pull couples apart. Think about it: You and your partner might be sitting next to each other on the couch or in bed, tapping away on your individual laptops, smart phones, or iPads, lost in a virtual world where flirting with a stranger, friend, or old flame is just a click away. In other words, you’re turning on social media—and maybe turning on to someone else, too—even as you tune each other out. From laptops, to smart phones, to tablets, today’s gadgets allow us to remain connected 24/7—yet that doesn’t necessarily mean that we are connected to our partner

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About this blog

Get a behind-the-scenes look at the latest stories from CNN Chief Medical Correspondent, Dr. Sanjay Gupta, Senior Medical Correspondent Elizabeth Cohen and the CNN Medical Unit producers. They'll share news and views on health and medical trends - info that will help you take better care of yourself and the people you love.

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