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The race for the next big cholesterol fighting drug
March 26th, 2012
05:42 PM ET

The race for the next big cholesterol fighting drug

A battle is officially on to produce the first drug in a new class of cholesterol lowering medications.

PCSK9 inhibitors have yielded promising early stage trial results for two different products at the American College of Cardiology Scientific Session in Chicago.

PCSK9 inhibitors have been developed based on previous research that revealed blocking the PCSK9 protein, which stands for proprotein convertase subtilisin/kexin 9, prevents it from binding to LDL receptors on the liver, and impairing the liver’s ability to properly filter bad cholesterol from the blood.

FULL POST


Could eating chocolate make you thinner?
March 26th, 2012
04:01 PM ET

Could eating chocolate make you thinner?

It's every woman's dream: could chocolate, the substance that cures everything from PMS to heartbreak,  also make you skinnier?

If true, there's got to be a catch, right?

Here's the skinny: Dr. Beatrice Golomb, associate professor of medicine at University of California, San Diego, has published a study in the Archives of Internal Medicine linking regular chocolate consumption with a lower body mass index, or BMI. FULL POST


Parents need warnings about multiple SIDS risks, study says
March 26th, 2012
12:01 AM ET

Parents need warnings about multiple SIDS risks, study says

More parents seem to have gotten the message that their infants need to sleep on their backs to reduce the risk of dying from Sudden Infant Death Syndrome (SIDS).  However they seem to be unaware that often multiple risk factors occurring at the same time increase the risk of SIDS, according to new research published Monday.

Back in 1994, a campaign called "back-to-sleep" was launched to encourage parents to place their infants on their backs when they sleep to prevent SIDS, the leading cause of death among babies aged 1 to 12 months. And it helped: 10 years later the death rates from SIDS were cut in half.  But around 2000 those rates began to plateau and new research published in the journal Pediatrics suggests it may be due to an increase in other risk factors for SIDS such as bed-sharing and having babies sleep on adult mattresses and bedding.

Researchers studied the records of 568 SIDS babies in San Diego, California, who died between 1991 and 2008 - before and after the 'back-to-sleep' campaign began.  Scientists wanted to find out if the prominent risk factors for SIDS deaths had changed over time.  Experts know that the chance of developing SIDS increases when a baby sleeps on his or her stomach, shares a bed with someone, is born premature and if the mother-to-be smoked.  In this study, scientists found that the biggest risk for SIDS, stomach sleeping, had dramatically dropped during the 17 year period, but the amount of bed-sharing had doubled, especially in babies younger than 2 months old. FULL POST


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About this blog

Get a behind-the-scenes look at the latest stories from CNN Chief Medical Correspondent, Dr. Sanjay Gupta, Senior Medical Correspondent Elizabeth Cohen and the CNN Medical Unit producers. They'll share news and views on health and medical trends - info that will help you take better care of yourself and the people you love.

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