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Epinephrine may save the heart, but not the brain, says study
March 20th, 2012
04:59 PM ET

Epinephrine may save the heart, but not the brain, says study

Using the drug epinephrine during a cardiac arrest may do more harm than good, says a new study.

Researchers at the Kyushu University School of Medicine in Japan looked at the medical records of more than 400,000 cardiac arrest patients over a three-year period and found that while the drug may be effective in the short-term, it may not improve survival outcomes in the long-term.

According to the report, patients who received doses of the adrenaline-like drug in the ambulance were three times more likely to regain a heartbeat before they reached the hospital, when compared to those who did not get the drug. FULL POST


Cops more forgetful after chases or altercations
March 20th, 2012
02:30 PM ET

Cops more forgetful after chases or altercations

Police officers who engage in at least 60 seconds of intense physical energy while involved in a combative encounter may suffer memory loss, according to a newly published study in the journal Psychological Science.

Researchers found that officers chasing down a suspect or engaging in a physical altercation with someone can often forget details of the incident, including being unable to identify the suspect from a lineup.

The study's lead author, Dr. Lorraine Hope, University of Portsmouth, United Kingdom, said the study's findings are a "warning" to officers, police chiefs and even the court system.

FULL POST


March 20th, 2012
01:24 PM ET

Four-time cancer survivor gives back

Editor's note: In the Human Factor, we profile survivors who have overcome the odds. Confronting a life obstacle – injury, illness or other hardship – they tapped their inner strength and found resilience they didn't know they possessed.  This week, Jon Huntsman Sr., father of former Republican presidential candidate Jon Huntsman Jr., shares his story.

When this businessman was born 74 years ago, he wasn't expected to live. He's also survived four types of cancer: prostate, mouth and two types of skin cancer - squamous cell carcinoma and melanoma. Yet, he says his biggest challenge in his life was watching his daughter Kathleen die after suffering from drug addiction and leaving behind seven young children, whom he helped raise.

Huntsman has donated more than $1 billion dollars for cancer research and scholarships.  He sat down with CNN at his headquarters in Salt Lake City and shared some of his thoughts. The following is an excerpt from that interview:

CNN: You say your success was built by working hard and with the help of many others and always thinking of others.

From very humble beginnings, surrounding myself with very marvelous people, we've been able to build quite a large business. And I'm pleased to say that right from the beginning, we started giving money away to charity over 40 years ago, even when I had to borrow from the bank.
FULL POST


Ibuprofen may ward off altitude sickness
March 20th, 2012
12:07 PM ET

Ibuprofen may ward off altitude sickness

Ibuprofen has been used for decades to treat pain. Now, research suggests the drug's anti-inflammatory properties also may help prevent the piercing headaches and other symptoms of altitude sickness.

A small new study, published this week in the Annals of Emergency Medicine, found that people who took four 600-milligram doses of ibuprofen over a 24-hour period in which they ascended to 12,570 feet above sea level were less likely to experience altitude sickness than people taking a placebo.

Sixty-nine percent of the participants who took placebo during the ascent developed the headaches, nausea, dizziness, and fatigue that characterize altitude sickness, also known as acute mountain sickness. By contrast, just 43% of people who took ibuprofen developed the condition.
FULL POST

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Filed under: Health.com • Medications

Triathlete: I allowed myself to change my life
Nancy Klinger, far right, goes for a run with Dr. Sanjay Gupta and other Fit Nation Tri Challenge participants in Atlanta.
March 20th, 2012
11:11 AM ET

Triathlete: I allowed myself to change my life

Editor's note: Nancy Klinger is one of seven CNN viewers chosen to be a part of the CNN Fit Nation Triathlon Challenge. Nancy applied for the Challenge after separating from her husband of 26 years.

On November 17, 2011, I sent in a video submission to CNN hoping to be selected as a participant in the CNN Fit Nation Triathlon Challenge.  I shared my fears and showed my emotion.

I shared that I was afraid about being able to make it on my own through the upcoming Minnesota winter.  I shared things that no one knew I was going through, not even my closest friends.  I allowed my vulnerability to show, which is something that I just don’t do - something that I have always been really good at not doing.

Something that drove husband crazy for many years.  I have always been the strong one, the helper, the caregiver, the protector, the giver.

I became this person at an early age out of necessity and since that time I just don’t let my guard down.

This time I allowed myself to be vulnerable because in my mind I was just talking to a computer screen.  It was cathartic. I did not think for an instant that someone would actually hear me, and never in my wildest imagination did I even consider that I would be selected as one of the Lucky Seven.
FULL POST


Keep kids away from the medicine cabinet
March 20th, 2012
02:01 AM ET

Keep kids away from the medicine cabinet

It’s a stunning statistic: Each day roughly four school busloads of U.S. children – about 165 young kids – are seen in emergency rooms after getting into medications - and each visit is preventable.

Those are the findings revealed in a report by Safe Kids Worldwide, which unveiled a new initiative Tuesday called “Safe Storage, Safe Dosing, Safe Kids." The campaign calls on caregivers, medical personnel, pharmacists, drug makers and government groups to work to reduce accidental poisonings of children from medications.

FULL POST


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About this blog

Get a behind-the-scenes look at the latest stories from CNN Chief Medical Correspondent, Dr. Sanjay Gupta, Senior Medical Correspondent Elizabeth Cohen and the CNN Medical Unit producers. They'll share news and views on health and medical trends - info that will help you take better care of yourself and the people you love.

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