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Getting to the starting line of your first tri
Women run into the surf at the start of the 2012 Mooloolaba ITU Triathlon World Cup on March 25 in Australia.
March 30th, 2012
07:37 AM ET

Getting to the starting line of your first tri

We could fill every inch of a year’s worth of Triathlete issues with training advice - there’s that much information and that many approaches to triathlon training.

But you don’t need an encyclopedic knowledge of the sport to get a successful start. We compiled some of the most common training questions we hear and had veteran coach and successful former pro Jimmy Riccitello weigh in with his expert opinion.

How many months/weeks of training will I need?

“If you’re a reasonably fit person who can swim a bit, you could do a sprint triathlon tomorrow,” says Riccitello. Recommended? No. But doable? Yes.
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New book questions 'The Myth of Sex Addiction'
Tiger Woods is just one of the celebrities -- from Russell Brand to Anthony Weiner -- who has allegedly entered sex rehab.
March 29th, 2012
01:53 PM ET

New book questions 'The Myth of Sex Addiction'

Ian Kerner, a sexuality counselor and New York Times best-selling author, blogs about sex weekly on The Chart. Read more from him on his website, GoodInBed.

Is sex addiction for real? Or is it “nothing more than a pop-psychology phenomenon, serving only to demonize sex, enforce moral views of sex and relationships and excuse irresponsible behaviors?”

Those are the fighting words of psychologist David Ley, who, in his rousing new book, “The Myth of Sex Addiction," expresses concern over the slippery ease with which America’s mainstream media and burgeoning “addictionology industry” have seemingly conspired to transform a debatable diagnosis into a foregone conclusion.
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Filed under: Addiction • Sex

Nature: More flu surveillance needed
Live chickens are sold in the Ha Giang province of Vietnam, where avian flu has reemerged.
March 29th, 2012
07:01 AM ET

Nature: More flu surveillance needed

An analysis from Nature shows that there's not as much flu surveillance as you might think.

There were about 1,000 flu sequences from 400 avian virus samples collected in 2010, yet the world poultry population was 21 billion, the journal reported Wednesday. Countries such as Indonesia, Russia, India and Mexico contributed few samples to an international virus database despite large poultry populations. Brazil, with a poultry population of 1.27 billion, did not collect any avian flu samples - nor did Morocco, the Philippines, Colombia, Ecuador, Algeria, Venezuela and the Dominican Republic.

The Nature report characterizes surveillance generally as ad hoc and reactive, responding to outbreaks or temporary projects rather than being consistent. That's a problem because global threats can emerge from a flu virus at any moment. FULL POST


April Fool's Day resolution: 'Restarting my restart'
Jeff Dauler, second from left, performs basketball drills with the Atlanta Hawks during kickoff weekend.
March 29th, 2012
05:30 AM ET

April Fool's Day resolution: 'Restarting my restart'

Jeff Dauler is one of seven CNN viewers participating in the Fit Nation Triathlon Challenge. Three months into the program, he's using the month of April to reaffirm his commitment to an active lifestyle.

"I'm doing a triathlon in 2012" is one sentence that contains a couple dozen New Year's resolutions. I needed to train every day. Eat healthy. Go to bed early. Drink more water. Drink less beer. Manage my time better. Blog frequently. Give my life over to my coach. Make the triathlon a priority, no matter what.

That announcement was almost three months ago. I've come far … but not far enough.

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Obesity rate climbs for Mexican-Americans, study says
March 28th, 2012
03:56 PM ET

Obesity rate climbs for Mexican-Americans, study says

Hispanics are one of the fastest growing ethnic groups in the United States.  By the year 2050, the U.S. Census Bureau projects Hispanics will compose 30 percent of the population.  Most are Mexican-American.  A new government study drills down on the changing way Mexican-Americans adults are eating and its effect on their health.

Researchers at the National Center for Health Statistics compared statistics from 1982-1984 and 1999-2006.

Among the findings:

  • Obesity is up.  In the early 1980s 21% of Mexican Americans were obese.  By the middle of the last decade, the number had climbed to close to 35%.
  • More Mexican-Americans also have diabetes.  Close to 14% have it now - versus just under 10% 25 years ago.
  • The group's consumption of carbs is also up from just under 46% in the 1980s to just over 51%.
  • Mexican-Americans are also not eating as much protein as they once did, though those numbers are just slightly different.
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Weight loss and my machine 'companion'
Glenn Keller and Fit Nation Athletic Director April Burkey stretch after a run in Atlanta.
March 28th, 2012
09:01 AM ET

Weight loss and my machine 'companion'

Glenn Keller is one of seven CNN viewers participating in the 2012 Fit Nation Triathlon Challenge. At the beginning of the challenge, Keller weighed more than 300 pounds and suffered from sleep apnea due to his obesity.

It's been ten years or so now that I was diagnosed with sleep apnea. I was told that it was a result of my being overweight. The process started with a sleep study when I spent the night in a sleep lab so that the degree of sleep apnea could be diagnosed. That way they would be able to determine settings for my new companion, a C.P.A.P. (continuous positive airway pressure) machine.

I use the term "companion" because the machine goes everywhere with me. I've been unable to go anywhere without it for years and I mean anywhere.

It has gone more places with me than my wife.

When I went on a cruise ... it was there.

When I go to Louisiana to visit my mother - it's right there.

Spend a night somewhere in a motel ... and it's right there.

And yes, it's in the truck also, every time it moves.

FULL POST


Can HPV vaccine benefit more people?
March 27th, 2012
06:31 PM ET

Can HPV vaccine benefit more people?

A new study released in this week’s British Medical Journal finds that the human papillomavirus, or HPV, vaccine, Gardasil,  given to young women to help prevent cervical cancer may have some additional benefits for women who are already infected with HPV.

Gardasil maker Merck funded the study and found that the vaccine reduced re-occurrence of HPV related diseases by 46% among women who were infected prior to vaccination.

FULL POST


March 27th, 2012
01:36 PM ET

36-hour face transplant 'most extensive' ever

A 37-year-old man received an extensive face transplant stretching from his hairline down to the neck, including a jaw, full set of teeth, tongue and cheeks. The surgery essentially replaced most of the patient’s face except for his eyes and the back remnant of his throat.

Richard Lee Norris of Hillsville, Virginia, is the 23rd patient to receive a face transplant in the world.  His doctors at the R. Adams Cowley Shock Trauma Center at the University of Maryland Medical Center say this operation is the most extensive surgery of its kind because of the extent of the transplant and the placement of an entire set of teeth.

“The face will look like a blend of the donor as well as Richard,” said Dr.Eduardo D. Rodriguez, associate professor of surgery at the University of Maryland School of Medicine.  “There are some unique features, his nose, the chin that have been replaced in entirety. Other than that, it’s a combination of both individuals.”

The hospital did not release details about the anonymous donor, due to the family's request.  The family specifically consented to the face transplant procedure.  His heart, lungs, liver and kidneys were used to save the lives of five other patients, according to the hospital.

FULL POST


Bypass surgery bests angioplasty for long-term survival
March 27th, 2012
09:38 AM ET

Bypass surgery bests angioplasty for long-term survival

Older people with heart disease who undergo non-emergency procedures to restore blood flow to their heart generally have better long-term survival odds with bypass surgery than with angioplasty, according to new research published online in the New England Journal of Medicine.

The study included about 190,000 men and women over age 65 who had bypass surgery or angioplasty - a far less invasive procedure - between 2004 and 2008. One year after the procedures, the survival rates for both groups hovered just under 94%. At the four-year mark, however, 84% of the bypass patients and 79% of the angioplasty patients were still alive.

The difference in survival rates was consistent across several key subgroups of patients, including men and women, high- and low-risk patients, and those with and without diabetes, the study found. FULL POST


March 27th, 2012
08:00 AM ET

Human Factor: TBI and the healing power of art

Editor's note: In the Human Factor, we profile survivors who have overcome the odds. Confronting a life obstacle – injury, illness or other hardship – they tapped their inner strength and found resilience they didn't know they possessed. This week, we introduce you to a journalist and artist, who shares her story of how creating art helped  her overcome the trauma following a traumatic brain injury (TBI).

“WHACK’ed … then everything was different” was me - eight years before it became the title of my exhibit. I was whacked while bicycling back from work by a red speeding car. Life has been different ever since and art became an integral part of my recovery and my identity.

I started painting portraits of traumatic brain injury survivors to raise awareness about TBI. I selected people from various walks of life: Trisha Meili, “the Central Park Jogger”; Troy Aikman and Pat Lafontaine; Keith Richards and George Clooney; TV news reporter Bob Woodruff, to illustrate the diversity of people affected by TBI.  More importantly, I wanted to show examples of brain injury survivors who moved on to have full, productive lives. I hope the portraits offer inspiration to those recently injured: kinship and identity with such icons is a powerful emotion, encompassing pride, pleasure and self-compassion, all of which are in short supply during the rehabilitation process. FULL POST


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About this blog

Get a behind-the-scenes look at the latest stories from CNN Chief Medical Correspondent, Dr. Sanjay Gupta, Senior Medical Correspondent Elizabeth Cohen and the CNN Medical Unit producers. They'll share news and views on health and medical trends - info that will help you take better care of yourself and the people you love.

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