home
RSS
Is your boss ruining your weekend?
February 26th, 2012
08:00 AM ET

Is your boss ruining your weekend?

Editor's note: CNN contributor Amanda Enayati ponders the theme of seeking serenity: the quest for well-being and life balance in stressful times.

Most Sundays last year, Juliet woke up feeling fine. But as the day wore on, she grew more agitated.

“By early afternoon I felt sick with stress and was walking around snapping at everyone. It was my husband who finally figured out that I was dreading going back to work Monday morning. The anticipation was ruining my Sundays."

Juliet had loved her job until the company where she worked was bought out. The culture of the organization originally built and run by a handful of idealistic scientists shifted overnight.

“The scientists were out, and the incoming CEO and leadership team were these marketing types who set an entirely different tone. The new executives were like these funnels of stress, spreading anxiety throughout the organization.”
FULL POST


What the Yuck: Will anesthesia make me loopy?
February 25th, 2012
09:00 AM ET

What the Yuck: Will anesthesia make me loopy?

Too embarrassed to ask your doctor about sex, body quirks, or the latest celeb health fad? In a regular feature and a new book, "What the Yuck?!," Health magazine medical editor Dr. Roshini Raj tackles your most personal and provocative questions. Send 'em to Dr. Raj at whattheyuck@health.com.

Q: I'm having surgery, and I'm worried the anesthesia will make me say or do something embarrassing. What's the risk?

A: Don't worry - I see sedated patients every day, and I can't recall anyone ever saying anything truly mortifying.

Yes, if you're going under general anesthesia (meaning you'll be out completely), you may become disoriented and uninhibited as the drug starts to work. You're usually asleep, though, before you can say or do anything really silly.

The risk is a little greater as you're waking up, when the combo of anesthesia and any other medication you've been given may make your brain a bit fuzzy.

But doctors are professionals - we're focused on our work, not on hearing juicy bedside confessions. I promise!


February 24th, 2012
02:00 PM ET

'Top Chef' Talbot: Cooking and diabetes can mix

Editor's note: In the Human Factor, we profile survivors who have overcome the odds. Confronting a life obstacle – injury, illness or other hardship – they tapped their inner strength and found resilience they didn't know they possessed. This week meet Sam Talbot, executive chef at the Surf Lodge in Montauk, New York, who became known across the nation when he joined season 2 of Bravo's reality show "Top Chef." He is living with type 1 diabetes.

I remember being about 8 years old in Cleveland, Ohio, and going to the farmer's market with my grandmother, and getting eggs and making scrambled eggs and all those types of things that an 8-year-old doesn't necessarily just pick up. 

And I fell in love with it. As time went on, I'd try to make my parents breakfast in bed. It would be Saturday morning and they had to ban me from the kitchen because I was in there at 7 a.m. banging things around. 

My whole thing is about being as eco-sustainable as possible and cooking sustainable seafood, and food that makes sense for the mind, body and soul.  
FULL POST


February 24th, 2012
12:26 PM ET

CDC director: We can reduce prescription drug overdoses

Thirty years ago, I attended medical school in New York. In the key lecture on pain management, the professor told us confidently that patients who received prescription narcotics for pain would not become addicted.

While pain management remains an essential patient right, a generation of health care professionals, patients, and families have learned the hard way how deeply misguided that assertion was. Narcotics - both illegal and legal - are dangerous drugs that can destroy lives and communities.

Millions of Americans struggle with substance abuse. Across the United States, overdoses involving opioid painkillers - a class of drugs with narcotic effects that includes hydrocodone, methadone, oxycodone - have skyrocketed in the past decade.

Today, the United States consumes most of the world’s supply of opioid painkillers. By 2010, enough opioid painkillers were prescribed to medicate every American adult around-the-clock for a month. And every year, nearly 15,000 people die from overdoses involving these drugs... more than from heroin and cocaine combined.
FULL POST


A Vancouver science diary
The AAAS meeting took place at the Vancouver Convention Center. Yep, that's the view. Yep, I want to go back.
February 24th, 2012
10:51 AM ET

A Vancouver science diary

Editor's note: Elizabeth Landau (@lizlandau) is a writer/producer for CNN.com.

Meat from stem cells? Singing without your vocal chords? I'm still trying to mentally process all of the cool research that I learned about at the American Association for the Advancement of Science annual meeting.

Last weekend, @AAASMeetings drew about 8,000 scientists, journalists, educators, policymakers and communicators came from all over the world to idyllic Vancouver, British Columbia.

For someone who misses the knowledge-thirst-quenching aspects of college, it's pretty blissful. You choose between dozens of subjects to learn about during the day, and then you get to hang out with fascinating people in the evenings. And you're tweeting the highlights to thousands of people, some of whom will want to meet up with you later. Of course, you'd better get those tweets right, or you'll get a #FAIL.

Here's a very condensed version (sorry for not mentioning everyone & everything):

FULL POST


Child cancer patient deals with drug shortage
February 24th, 2012
10:04 AM ET

Child cancer patient deals with drug shortage

Editor's note: Owen McMasters, 12, was diagnosed with Acuta Lymphoblastic Leukemia in November 2011. His family has been dealing with the shortage of methotrexate, a drug that treats cancer by slowing the growth of cancer cells. Between 2006 and 2010, drug shortages increased by more than 200%. Read more about these shortages, and what the FDA is doing to help, on The Chart.

Learning that the enlarged lymph nodes I showed my mom meant Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia (ALL), a type of cancer, and not mono, was devastating.

It meant that I would not be returning to school until at least next August. It meant I would spend unknown amounts of time in the hospital. It meant I would not be able to be around groups of people. (I have to limit which friends and family members I am around, since a simple cold for you could mean severe illness for me.)

It meant my hair I loved fell out, leaving me with baby bird fuzz on my head.

I underwent two operations in the first 36 hours and then went under anesthesia for either a spinal tap with chemotherapy, a bone marrow biopsy, or both, nearly every week. Because my platelets and white blood cell count are often critically low, I am unable to ride my bike, play any sports, wrestle with my brothers or do many of the things I like to do.

My new friends are other kids with bald or fuzzy heads who are going through the same thing as me.
FULL POST


Study: Bird flu death rate may be overblown
February 23rd, 2012
03:57 PM ET

Study: Bird flu death rate may be overblown

The consensus among many scientists has been that the strain of bird flu currently circulating – H5N1 – is not only highly infectious, but potentially deadly. That is based on the nearly 600 cases confirmed by the World Health Organization, more than half of which have resulted in death.

But a new study analyzing WHO data suggests that H5N1 may not be as virulent as previously thought, and that mild infections could be slipping under the radar because of less-than-ideal detection methods.

Were those mild cases included, the death rate due to H5N1 could be dramatically lower, according to research appearing in the journal, Science.
FULL POST


February 23rd, 2012
03:02 PM ET

FDA advisors recommend diet drug

On Wednesday morning, an advisory committee for the Food and Drug Administration recommended that the FDA approve Qnexa, a weight-loss drug that works to suppress appetite. The panel voted 20-to-2 in favor of approval.

The FDA has until April 17 to decide whether to take the committee's recommendation. If they do so, it will be the first time the FDA has approved a weight-loss drug since 1999.

The advisors' decision was a reversal of a previous recommendation in 2010. At the time, a panel rejected Qnexa based on concerns about increased heart rates, psychiatric problems and birth defects in patients taking the pills.

Dr. Sanjay Gupta explains what this means and what's next in the video above.

Read more on the history of diet pills and the FDA at Time.com and why there hasn't been a safe weight loss pill here


Filed under: Weight loss

Group sues EPA over popular weed killer
February 23rd, 2012
02:26 PM ET

Group sues EPA over popular weed killer

The Natural Resources Defense Council filed suit Thursday against the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency over 2,4-D, a widely used ingredient in broad leaf weed killers.

The NRDC went to court with the agency over its alleged failure to respond to a petition calling for the EPA to stop licensing the use of 2,4-D, which was one of two ingredients in the toxic Vietnam war herbicide Agent Orange.

"It's really time to connect the dots with this chemical and be much more cautious about its use," said Dr. Gina Solomon, a senior scientist at NRDC. "Right now it's used in widespread fashion on people's lawns, back yards, playgrounds, ball fields and soccer fields, where kids are getting it on their skin. That's a particular problem."

The EPA does not comment on pending litigation, spokesman Dale Kemery said.
FULL POST


Let's talk about sex... even if it's not easy
February 23rd, 2012
07:09 AM ET

Let's talk about sex... even if it's not easy

Ian Kerner, a sexuality counselor and New York Times best-selling author, blogs about sex weekly on The Chart. Read more from him on his website, GoodInBed.

As a sexuality counselor, a big part of my work is to facilitate a dialogue between couples who have often waited far too long to discuss a sex issue.

These couples have often allowed sex to become the elephant in the room. Maybe it started off with her faking it every once in awhile, but now it’s been years since she’s had an orgasm with her partner. Or maybe a couple has mismatched libidos, and one partner is humiliated at always being rejected, while the other feels terribly put upon.

Even if we’ve been married for years, the topic of sex still can make us blush. As a result, many people find themselves living in silent desperation - they may be lying next to someone in the same bed, but they feel like they’re a million miles apart.
FULL POST

Post by:
Filed under: Relationships • Sex

« newer posts    older posts »
Advertisement
About this blog

Get a behind-the-scenes look at the latest stories from CNN Chief Medical Correspondent, Dr. Sanjay Gupta, Senior Medical Correspondent Elizabeth Cohen and the CNN Medical Unit producers. They'll share news and views on health and medical trends - info that will help you take better care of yourself and the people you love.

Advertisement
Advertisement