home
RSS
How a MRSA strain came to flourish
February 21st, 2012
04:29 PM ET

How a MRSA strain came to flourish

How did MRSA, a persistent and  deadly bug, become the drug-resistant bacteria vexing medical and public health experts?

The answer is in the genes.  Researchers have pinpointed how a common strain found in livestock, called Staphylococcus aureus CC398 bounced from humans, when it was treatable, to animals where it became antibiotic resistant. 

Drug-resistant staph infection has been linked to the over use of antibiotics in livestock.  This is the first study to chart the genetic link between that and its consequences in humans.

FULL POST


Women more likely to die in the hospital after a heart attack, study finds
February 21st, 2012
04:20 PM ET

Women more likely to die in the hospital after a heart attack, study finds

Nearly every 34 seconds someone in the United States has a heart attack, according to the American Heart Association.  In fact, heart disease is the number one killer of both men and women in the U.S.

But that’s where some of the similarities end.

A study of heart attack patients finds that women are more likely than men to show up at the hospital without the classic chest pain symptoms of heart attack. The study also shows that women are more likely to die in the hospital following a heart attack. The study was published today in the Journal of the American Medical Association.
FULL POST


FDA continues to fight drug shortages in U.S.
February 21st, 2012
01:35 PM ET

FDA continues to fight drug shortages in U.S.

In response to President Obama's executive order to help prevent future drug shortages, the Food and Drug Administration Tuesday announced a series of steps to increase the supply of two critically needed cancer drugs: Methotrexate, a drug used to treat children with leukemia and some adult cancers, and Doxil, used to treat numerous forms of cancer from lung to ovarian. Doxil is also used in AIDS-related Kaposi's sarcoma and multiple myeloma.

"Through the collaborative work of FDA, industry, and other stakeholders, patients and families waiting for these products or anxious about their availability should now be able to get the medication they need," said FDA Commissioner, Dr. Margaret A. Hamburg.
FULL POST


February 21st, 2012
09:13 AM ET

Small strides you should take for your heart

Let's face it – life is busy. You've got calls to make, e-mails to send and meetings to get to. But what about appointments with yourself that you've been meaning to make?

"As I say to many of my patients, if you don't find time for exercise, you will have to find time for disease," Dr. Nanette Wenger tells CNN.  She's  a spokesperson for the American Heart Association (AHA) and  a cardiologist at the Emory University School of Medicine.

February is American Heart Month, when the AHA and other organizations hope to spread awareness about the dangers of an unhealthy lifestyle. The statistics haven't changed: Cardiovascular disease is still the leading killer of men and women in the United States and worldwide.

"The key to reducing this threat is prevention, and among the major preventive interventions– smoking cessation, control of cholesterol, control of blood pressure, control of weight and physical activity– physical activity can often be the cornerstone," Wenger said.
FULL POST


Advertisement
About this blog

Get a behind-the-scenes look at the latest stories from CNN Chief Medical Correspondent, Dr. Sanjay Gupta, Senior Medical Correspondent Elizabeth Cohen and the CNN Medical Unit producers. They'll share news and views on health and medical trends - info that will help you take better care of yourself and the people you love.

Advertisement
Advertisement