home
RSS
Limit hits, limit concussions in young brains
February 3rd, 2012
05:18 PM ET

Limit hits, limit concussions in young brains

The adolescent football player's brain is rattled an average of 650 times per season. That's just an average. There are positions on the football field where the numbers approach 1,000 hits to the head.  And while a small fraction of those hits actually lead to a diagnosable concussion, the concern is that sub-concussive damage - the menacing smaller blows that add up during practices and games - could be as bad, or worse, for the brain.

With those sobering stats in mind, the Sports Legacy Institute Friday called for the adoption of a "Hit Count" - similar to the "Pitch Count" system used in baseball - for youth athletes participating in contact sports.

FULL POST


Health tips for football fans and players
Fans of the New England Patriots, one of the teams playing in Super Bowl XLVI.
February 3rd, 2012
11:12 AM ET

Health tips for football fans and players

Dr. David Agus, M.D. is the author of "The End of Illness."

This Sunday, more than 100 million people are going to tune into the Super Bowl as the New York Giants take on the New England Patriots in Indianapolis. They will be watching more than just an American tradition at play - they will be witnessing one of the deadliest sports in history, whose record of premature deaths demonstrates in sobering reality the silent killer in all of us: inflammation.

Consider the following:

  • Heavy (overweight) NFL players are twice as likely to die before the age of 50.
  • 28% of all pro football players born in the last century who qualified as obese died before their 50th birthday, compared with 13% who were less overweight.
  • One of every 69 players born since 1955 is now dead; 22% of those players died of heart diseases; 19% died from homicides or suicides.
  • The average weight in the NFL has grown by 10% since 1985 to a current average of 248 pounds. The heaviest position, offensive tackle, went from 281 pounds two decades ago to 318 pounds.
  • In 2011, scientists at Loyola University Chicago’s Stritch School of Medicine found that 35% of 513 retired NFL players scored poorly enough on a test for Alzheimer’s symptoms to indicate dementia.

FULL POST

Post by:
Filed under: Cancer

Slowing down time with a swim, bike and run
February 3rd, 2012
09:45 AM ET

Slowing down time with a swim, bike and run

Editor's note: Today marks the kick-off of the 2012 CNN Fit Nation Tri Challenge.  This year's Challenge includes seven participants who have never competed in a triathlon.  This will be Dr. Sanjay Gupta's third CNN Fit Nation Tri Challenge.  Here Dr. Gupta shares what he has gained by joining the triathlete ranks.

As people get older, there is this feeling that time is moving faster than ever. Studies have shown that this feeling is true across cultures all over the world, genders and borders. As a student of the brain, I have been trying to learn why this time-warp feeling is so prevalent.

Of course, time itself is not changing, but it is our perceptions that change a great deal. As a child, days seemed to last forever, and you can probably describe in astonishing detail the first time you drove a car or a childhood summer. It turns out the first time you experience something brand new, the more attention you spend on it. You remember every little detail, and carefully store those details in your memory banks. It is that attention that seems to slow time down, and often make things more enjoyable.

It is also one of the reasons we should always be having new experiences, especially as we get older.
FULL POST


Advertisement
About this blog

Get a behind-the-scenes look at the latest stories from CNN Chief Medical Correspondent, Dr. Sanjay Gupta, Senior Medical Correspondent Elizabeth Cohen and the CNN Medical Unit producers. They'll share news and views on health and medical trends - info that will help you take better care of yourself and the people you love.

Advertisement
Advertisement