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December 9th, 2011
05:44 PM ET

Poultry company recalls cooked chicken

A North Carolina poultry company is recalling approximately 4,000 pounds of cooked chicken breasts that may be contaminated with Listeria monocytogenes. The U.S. Department of Agriculture announced on Friday, that the House of Raeford Farms, in Raeford, North Carolina, recalled 18- to 22-pound boxes containing 2- to 11- pound "Boneless Oven Roasted Chicken Breast."

The recalled products have the number “P-239A” inside the USDA mark of inspection along with a product code of “94268” and a package date of “1270” (September 27, 2011). The products were shipped to delicatessens and food service institutions for further processing in Florida, Georgia, North Carolina and South Carolina.

The problem was discovered after a customer's laboratory sample of the chicken tested positive for Listeria monocytogenes. The USDA's Food Safety and Inspection Service has received no reports of illness due to consumption of these products.
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December 9th, 2011
05:38 PM ET

Having 19 babies doesn't cause miscarriage

The Empowered Patient is a regular feature from CNN Senior Medical News Correspondent Elizabeth Cohen that helps put you in the driver's seat when it comes to health care.

There are many reasons that might explain why Michelle Duggar miscarried her twentieth child, but it’s likely not because her body failed after having so many children.

“It’s not about how many children you’ve had. It's more about your age, as miscarriages increase as you get older,” said Dr. George Macones, a spokesman for the American College of Obstetrics and Gynecology. Duggar is 45.

Duggar miscarried in her second trimester, which occurs in only about one to two percent of pregnancies, according to Macones, who added that second trimester miscarriages sometimes happen because the baby had a chromosomal abnormality, or because the baby died or the mother had a health problem, such as a weak cervix.

“Sometimes we just don’t know why they happen,” he added.

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Protect yourself against health insurance reversal
Joan Gagliardi was liable for $1.2 million when her insurance comany reversed its approval for her treatment.
December 9th, 2011
02:03 PM ET

Protect yourself against health insurance reversal

In 2008, Joan Gagliardi was diagnosed with a rare autoimmune disease that caused scarring on internal organs, including her windpipe. It began to choke off her ability to breathe, but doctors at the University of Miami Hospital kept the damage in check with a treatment known as IVIG: Infusions of immunoglobulin.

The bad news came in 2010, when Gagliardi learned that her insurance company, Highmark Blue Shield of Pennsylvania, which had previously approved the expensive treatments, had reversed itself. The denial was retroactive, leaving Gagliardi liable for $1.2 million or approximately $50,000 for each infusion.

Fortunately for Gagliardi, the hospital didn’t press its claim, choosing instead to negotiate with Highmark. This year they settled up, with Highmark agreeing to pay $382,229. Gagliardi was off the hook.

Surprisingly, it’s not uncommon for an insurer to reverse itself, even after a claim is paid. State laws vary, but companies often take up to a year to perform “utilization reviews,” in which they re-examine claims that they’ve already processed.
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My summer with Stanley Milgram
Stanley Milgram, right, talks with a study participant during his shock experiment in the 1960s.
December 9th, 2011
12:10 PM ET

My summer with Stanley Milgram

Editor's note: Alan Elms was the research assistant of social psychologist Stanley Milgram during Milgram's famous shock experiment in the 1960s, which tested participant's obedience to authority.

During my first several weeks as Stanley Milgram’s research assistant, I did the sorts of things that research assistants often do.

I transcribed Milgram’s dictations and drafts of research procedures into neatly typed pages. I began to keep files of research volunteers: Their age, educational background, occupation, address and phone number. I helped Milgram audition amateur actors for the important role of “experimenter” and the nearly-as-important role of “learner,” the research confederate whom we started to call the “victim.”

The real volunteers would be playing the role of “teacher” in what appeared to be an experiment where electric shocks were used to speed the learning of simple word pairs. As you probably know by now, 50 years later, the victim only pretended to be shocked and the experiment really measured obedience to authority.
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Tri Challenge journey still going, still working
December 9th, 2011
08:46 AM ET

Tri Challenge journey still going, still working

Kendrick Henley was one of six CNN viewers chosen to be a part of the 2011 Fit Nation Triathlon Challenge. He trained with Dr. Sanjay Gupta and raced the New York City Triathlon on August 7. Since then Henley has kept up his new healthy lifestyle and recently raced his second 5K since the triathlon. CNN is looking for viewers like Henley to join our 2012 Challenge. Click "Add Your Story" to apply.

The year 2011 might be coming to an end, but Kendrick’s journey and Team Henley’s celebrations continue...

When Kendrick, Coach Keith and I (Coach Mary Ann) became “Team Henley” in January 2011, none of us knew what to expect from the coming year. Kendrick had just been selected for the 2011 Fit Nation Challenge and Coach Keith and I were excited to have the opportunity to coach a new athlete from our hometown of Chicago.

That was pretty much all that we knew, and out of the three of us, Kendrick was taking the biggest risk. He was literally letting the world know that he wanted to change the way he was living, lose weight and take on a healthier lifestyle.
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About this blog

Get a behind-the-scenes look at the latest stories from CNN Chief Medical Correspondent, Dr. Sanjay Gupta, Senior Medical Correspondent Elizabeth Cohen and the CNN Medical Unit producers. They'll share news and views on health and medical trends - info that will help you take better care of yourself and the people you love.

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