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CDC: Americans consume too much sodium
October 20th, 2011
04:05 PM ET

CDC: Americans consume too much sodium

Eighty-eight percent of U.S. children and adults consume more sodium per day than the amount recommended by federal dietary guidelines, according to a new report released today by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

And most Americans aren't just exceeding these guidelines; they're shattering them. The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services and the U.S. Department of Agriculture recommend that adults and teens limit their daily sodium intake to 2,300 milligrams, but according to the report the average intake is 3,513 milligrams - 53% above the suggested limit.

Health.com: 25 foods with tons of hidden sodium

The picture is even worse among the subpopulations for whom the daily recommended limit is 1,500 milligrams: people over 50; blacks; and those with high blood pressure, diabetes, or kidney disease. Members of these groups, which account for nearly half of the U.S. population, tend to be especially sensitive to sodium, yet 99% of them exceed the recommended intake and the average person more than doubles the 1,500-milligram limit.
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If you want more sex, be nice!
October 20th, 2011
07:11 AM ET

If you want more sex, be nice!

Ian Kerner, a sexuality counselor and New York Times best-selling author, blogs about sex on Thursdays on The Chart. Read more from him on his website, GoodInBed.

Earlier this year, eminent marriage therapist John Gottman released a new book titled "The Science of Trust: Emotional Attunement for Couples." While you may not recognize Gottman by name, you may be aware of his work via Malcolm Gladwell’s book "Blink."

In that bestseller, readers were introduced to Gottman’s knack for “thin-slicing” a couple based upon a few minutes of observation, and determining, with incredible accuracy, whether they would succeed or fail in their marriage.

So what’s the secret of relationship success? Based upon his work with couples, as well as statistical analysis, Gottman has determined that, “It’s the balance between positive and negative emotional interactions in a marriage that determines its well-being - whether the good moments of mutual pleasure, passion, humor, support, kindness, and generosity outweigh the bad moments of complaining, criticism, anger, disgust, contempt, defensiveness, and coldness.”
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About this blog

Get a behind-the-scenes look at the latest stories from CNN Chief Medical Correspondent, Dr. Sanjay Gupta, Senior Medical Correspondent Elizabeth Cohen and the CNN Medical Unit producers. They'll share news and views on health and medical trends - info that will help you take better care of yourself and the people you love.

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