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Drug fights chemo-related bone loss in older women
October 13th, 2011
06:48 PM ET

Drug fights chemo-related bone loss in older women

An osteoporosis drug can protect women from potential bone loss due to breast cancer-fighting drugs, according to a new study.

Use of the bone drug zoledronic acid, made by the drug company Novartis, was  found to be effective only in postmenopausal women. "It's probably not going to work for women who are premenopausal," says lead study author Dr. Adam Brufsky.   "You should know about your bone health after getting breast cancer therapy and talk to your doctor about it."

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October 13th, 2011
03:25 PM ET

Lesson from Haiti's deadly cholera outbreak

Cholera cases have risen in Haiti, but the number dying from the disease is down, according to researchers from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

“The number of deaths were initially way too high,” said Dr. Robert Tauxe, researcher and deputy director at the CDC. “But within a few weeks of the outbreak, we trained teams to treat the disease and increased access to supplies.”

Tauxe says these improvements lowered the mortality rate from cholera in Haiti from 4% to below 1%, where it's been since December.

Cholera is contracted by consuming food or water contaminated with fecal bacteria. People who live in rural areas with a lack of adequate water treatment and sanitation are more likely to get the disease. While it can cause severe dehydration from rapid loss of body fluids, cholera is one of the easiest diseases to treat with oral rehydration salts.

Access to these very basic supplies was a core challenge in Haiti that led to many deaths soon after the outbreak.

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CDC: Heart disease prevalence down
October 13th, 2011
03:00 PM ET

CDC: Heart disease prevalence down

The prevalence of heart disease in the United States is declining, though rates vary widely depending on gender, race, education and geography, according to new figures released by the government.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention found that the prevalence of coronary heart disease decreased from 6.7% to 6.0% from 2006 to 2010. The results, based on a national telephone survey, were published Thursday in the CDC’s Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report.

"That’s a very significant decline, from 6.7% to 6%  in five years,” said Dr. Jerome Cohen, a board member of the National Lipid Association and professor emeritus in preventive cardiology at St. Louis University.

“The bottom line is good news and bad news,” Cohen added. “It shows what we can do [with treatment]. How we can do better is also shown by the wide disparities.”

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White House and MADD join forces against drugged driving
October 13th, 2011
01:21 PM ET

White House and MADD join forces against drugged driving

In an effort to combat an increase in the number of teenage drugged driving cases, White House announced Thursday that it will partner with Mothers Against Drunk Driving to create a new information campaign, calling on parents to become more aware of this dangerous trend.

Gil Kerlikowske, director of National Drug Control Policy,  along with Jan Withers, national president of MADD announced the partnership to raise public awareness regarding the consequences of drugged driving. MADD already has launched a nationwide campaign against poly-abuse (both alcohol and drugs) and drugged driving, and is pushing for law enforcement officers to strongly enforce laws against drugged driving. Along with these efforts, the drug control policy office  is releasing new materials for parents and teens aimed at educating young drivers and their families about  the dangers of driving while under the influence of drugs.

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Are female orgasms a 'bonus'?
October 13th, 2011
07:14 AM ET

Are female orgasms a 'bonus'?

Ian Kerner, a sexuality counselor and New York Times best-selling author, blogs about sex on Thursdays on The Chart. Read more from him on his website, GoodInBed.

What do female orgasms and male nipples have in common? It’s a question that is helping inform research into the purpose of female orgasm (other than simply as a form of pleasure).

Investigators want to know whether the female orgasm is an “adaptation” or “byproduct” of evolution. In other words, does the female orgasm, like the male orgasm, have its own evolutionary raison d’etre and contribute directly to reproductive success? Or is it just an awesome bonus? Make that totally awesome.

This question of whether the female orgasm is an adaptation or a byproduct came to the fore in 2005 with the publication of “The Case of the Female Orgasm: Bias in the Science of Evolution,” in which Indiana University professor Elisabeth Lloyd rigorously examined 21 theories that sought to promote the female orgasm as an adaptation and, ultimately, found all of them lacking.

Over the years, I’ve been lucky enough to have had some thought-provoking conversations with Lloyd on various topics – such as whether premature ejaculation makes good evolutionary sense – and recently, her work has been once again garnering much-deserved attention.
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October 13th, 2011
12:01 AM ET

Healthier foods earn healthier profits

Foods that are good for the waistline are also good for the bottom line.  That’s the conclusion of a report out Thursday from the Hudson Institute, a non-partisan policy research organization.

The Hudson Institute’s Obesity Solutions Initiative found the food and beverage companies with the most “better for you” products grew faster, had higher profits and superior shareholder returns over the last five years.

Hank Cardello, a former food company executive and lead author, said the report was the first to look at profitability of healthier products in terms CEOs can understand.

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About this blog

Get a behind-the-scenes look at the latest stories from CNN Chief Medical Correspondent, Dr. Sanjay Gupta, Senior Medical Correspondent Elizabeth Cohen and the CNN Medical Unit producers. They'll share news and views on health and medical trends - info that will help you take better care of yourself and the people you love.

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