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Leg crossing may signal better recovery for stroke patients
October 10th, 2011
04:31 PM ET

Leg crossing may signal better recovery for stroke patients

The ability of some stroke patients to cross their legs soon after having a stroke may offer insight into how successfully they will recover, compared to patients who can’t cross their legs. The findings are in a small study published in the journal Neurology.

“Despite having severe strokes that left them with slight loss of movement and even reduced consciousness, we noticed that some people were still able to cross their legs, which is not as easy as it seems,” lead study author Dr. Berend Feddersen of the University of Munich, Germany said in a news release. He notes that if future studies confirm the results of this study, a stroke patient’s ability to cross their legs may give doctors a tool for assessing how well a patient may recover.

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Test may be better gauge of heart attack risk
October 10th, 2011
02:00 PM ET

Test may be better gauge of heart attack risk

A growing number of patients should consider blood tests that go beyond the standard cholesterol numbers to gauge their risk for heart disease, an expert panel says.

Patients considered at intermediate risk for heart disease, perhaps the majority of the population, should be tested for C-reactive protein, a panel of specialists concluded in the current Journal of Clinical Lipidology.

Total cholesterol, LDL and HDL do not do as well predicting heart attack and stroke risk in patients with diabetes or metabolic syndrome, especially if those patients are already taking a cholesterol-lowering statin medication, said Dr. Michael H. Davidson, who headed the 17-member panel.

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Student doctors practice on you while you sleep
October 10th, 2011
09:24 AM ET

Student doctors practice on you while you sleep

Anthony Youn, M.D., is a plastic surgeon in Metro Detroit. He is the author of “In Stitches,” a humorous memoir about growing up Asian American and becoming a doctor.

Autumn. The air turns cool and crisp, leaves change color, and third-year medical students descend on hospitals to learn to be real doctors… by practicing on real people.

As a plastic surgeon, part of my job includes the art of suturing. Over the past 15 years, I’ve repaired more than 10,000 cuts, incisions, bites, and wounds.

I’ve seen it all — people who’ve been sliced by beer bottles, attacked by wild animals, and even injured by — I want to be delicate here — “personal, intimate devices.” I’ve done so much suturing that sewing up people has become second nature. I can repair a dog bite to the face blindfolded.
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October 10th, 2011
09:04 AM ET

October 10th, 2011
08:55 AM ET

Why is my urine red?

Every weekday, a CNNHealth expert doctor answers a viewer question. On Mondays, it's pediatrician Dr. Jennifer Shu.

Question asked by asked by Cassandra of Hamden, Connecticut:

I notice the color of my urine has gone from looking like champagne to looking like cranberry juice in three days. Should I be concerned? I am not on any medications.

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About this blog

Get a behind-the-scenes look at the latest stories from CNN Chief Medical Correspondent, Dr. Sanjay Gupta, Senior Medical Correspondent Elizabeth Cohen and the CNN Medical Unit producers. They'll share news and views on health and medical trends - info that will help you take better care of yourself and the people you love.

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