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Too young to know your gender?
The story of 11-year-old Tammy who was born a boy and is now living as a girl sheds some light on the issue of childhood transgender issues
September 27th, 2011
12:36 PM ET

Too young to know your gender?

Comments of the morning:

“I applaud these parents for loving their child for who she is and allowing her to find herself rather than forcing her to suppress all of her feelings and be ‘normal.’" - WowMe

“If God wanted him to be her, God would of created you as such. Going against Gods word is dangerous!” - The9thSeal

Little boy lives as little girl

Hindered by a speech impediment, it wasn’t until age 3 that Thomas Lobel, by learning sign language, could communicate with his parents and the first thing he told them was that he was a girl. Eight years later, Thomas now goes by Tammy and lives as a girl, a process that has been difficult for her parents; the balance of supporting their child and taking criticism from family and friends can be painful and confusing.

So what do CNN.com readers think about their decision to support Tammy’s wishes to live as a girl? Some said they fully support it, while others said that, among other things, Tammy is too young to fully understand gender.

bojimbo261 said, “Children know more than adults do.”

flipnap2112 said, “I am a 42-year-old man. Some of the ways I acted and dressed would have had these adults convincing me I’m transgender. But back then my parents just laughed, didn’t assign a thing to my behavior and I grew up as normal as one can. I’m as heterosexual as one can get. Why are you doing MRIs and brain scans. They’re kids!”

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Sleep-deprived teens take more risks
September 27th, 2011
07:19 AM ET

Sleep-deprived teens take more risks

It’s not uncommon for teens to stay up late – finishing school assignments, talking or emailing with friends, being involved in social activities, or working a job.

A study published in Preventive Medicine reveals that more than two-thirds of U.S. teens report they’re getting less than eight hours sleep on school nights, and researchers say that lack of sufficient sleep is associated with risky behaviors such as smoking, drinking alcohol, being sexually active, using marijuana, lower physical activity, and feeling sad or helpless.

“Insufficient sleep on school nights is common and is associated with participation in health risk behaviors including substance use, fighting, and consideration of suicide,” according to lead author Lela R. McKnight-Eily of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, who explained that while previous research revealed the large sleep deficit experienced by many teens, this is the first large-scale national research to associate a variety sleep behaviors among teens with health risk behaviors using Youth Risk Behavior Survey data. Other studies have made this link with some of the risk behaviors studied, but generally much smaller or non-national samples.

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The sting of jellyfish, man-of-war and unfulfilled dreams
September 26th, 2011
05:43 PM ET

The sting of jellyfish, man-of-war and unfulfilled dreams

Bloblike sea creatures, the jellyfish and the Portuguese man-of-war thwarted Diana Nyad’s attempt to swim from Cuba to Florida on Sunday.

After the swim, Nyad’s face appeared swollen and she had sting marks across her arm, where she had tussled with the various sea creatures. Nyad said their toxins began to cause partial paralysis and made it increasingly difficult for her to breathe and continue the swim.

Jellyfish don’t sting people in search of a meal, said Richard Satterlie, professor of marine biology at the Center for Marine Science at the University of North Carolina at Wilmington. They tend to sting anything or anyone they come into contact with.    FULL POST


Vitamin B12 deficiency linked to memory problems
September 26th, 2011
04:49 PM ET

Vitamin B12 deficiency linked to memory problems

There's been a lot of buzz about vitamin B12 in recent years, and here's another reason to pay attention to it:

A new study finds that a deficiency in vitamin B12 is associated with memory and thinking problems, as well as brain shrinkage. The research is published in the journal Neurology.

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September 26th, 2011
10:07 AM ET

How do we prevent kidney stones in kids?

Every weekday, a CNNHealth expert doctor answers a viewer question. On Mondays, it's pediatrician Dr. Jennifer Shu.

Question asked by Aaron from California:

My 12-year-old daughter was found to have calcium oxalate crystals in her urine. The doctor said to watch out for kidney stones, which happen to run in our family. What should we do to prevent my daughter from developing stones?
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Fewer hospitals giving away free formula
September 26th, 2011
12:01 AM ET

Fewer hospitals giving away free formula

An increasing number of hospitals are no longer giving new moms industry-sponsored baby formula samples when they leave the hospital, and that's a good thing,  health experts say.

The number of hospitals choosing to discontinue this practice doubled, on average, in the past four years according to a study published Monday in the journal Pediatrics.

However, most hospitals still send new parents home with samples of formula, even though major health organizations including the American Academy of Pediatrics, World Health Organization, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and the American Congress of Obstetricians and Gynecologists recommend mothers try to exclusively breastfeed their babies for the first six months of life.  Breast milk is considered to be the best source of nutrition for newborns and infants.

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New member of the family?  You may need a new vaccine
September 26th, 2011
12:01 AM ET

New member of the family? You may need a new vaccine

There is nothing quite as momentous as bringing a new baby home.  There are smiles, kisses and sometimes tears, especially for families who have waited a long time for the moment to arrive.  For parents who adopt children from abroad, arriving home is often extra special.  The investment of time,  money and travel has resulted in a homecoming for a special little person who is finally sleeping safely in Mom and Dad's arms.

In the past, experts have told parents who travel internationally to adopt children to get vaccinated against the hepatitis A virus.  Now the American Academy of Pediatrics is supporting a Centers for Disease Control and Prevention  recommendation that other people who may have close contact with the children in the months after they arrive in the United States also get vaccinated.

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September 25th, 2011
11:48 AM ET

Nyad ends swim

Distance swimmer Diana Nyad has ended her latest record attempt.

CNN Medical News producer Matt Sloane reports that she came out of the water Sunday  shortly after 11 a.m. ET. Injuries she suffered Saturday evening caused her to get off course,  her team Captain Mark Sollinger told CNN.

Her blog also reported the decision.

Come back to CNN.com for more updates.


September 25th, 2011
11:18 AM ET

Sunday: After drama, Nyad resumes swim

Sunday update: After nighttime drama, Diana Nyad is still swimming Sunday morning.

She came out of the water just before 10 p.m. Saturday,  to receive medical treatment for more stings, this time to her face and eyes. She resumed the swim a couple of hours later, at the spot where she came out, her handlers reported.

Because of that, the International Swim Federation official accompanying Nyad told the team, if she completes the swim, it will be still be a  record, but  for a "staged" swim, meaning just as it sounds, it took place in stages rather than one uninterrupted effo

CNN journalists headed out from Key West, Florida, on Sunday morning and expect to reach Nyad around midday. Follow @MattCNN, And come back to CNN.com for updates.

We told the story of Diana Nyad's milestone August swim  in an  hourlong documentary, Diana Nyad: Xtreme Dream.

On that attempt she was pulled from the water after 29 hours. She began this swim just after 6 p.m. Friday in Havana, Cuba.

Follow @DianaNyad on Twitter. Her team is blogging at DianaNyad.com


September 24th, 2011
11:35 AM ET

Nyad trying again for swim record

CNN  told the story of Diana Nyad's milestone August swim  in an  hourlong documentary last weekend, Diana Nyad: Xtreme Dream.

On Friday night, Nyad began yet another chapter, jumping into the water in Havana, Cuba, trying once more to set a distance record for open-water swimming without a shark cage.

Follow Diana on Twitter

Friday night, she was stung multiple times by a Portuguese man-of-war, according to her blog, and on Saturday morning, the blog said, she was struggling in the water, believing she was not getting adequate oxygen to her muscles.

 

Diana's blog and stroke tracker

Just before 9 a.m. Saturday, her handlers tweeted that she was  about 25 miles off Cuba. Her team expects the 100-mile-plus swim will take as long as 60 hours.

In the August attempt, she was pulled her from the water after almost 29 hours.  


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About this blog

Get a behind-the-scenes look at the latest stories from CNN Chief Medical Correspondent, Dr. Sanjay Gupta, Senior Medical Correspondent Elizabeth Cohen and the CNN Medical Unit producers. They'll share news and views on health and medical trends - info that will help you take better care of yourself and the people you love.

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