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September 27th, 2011
05:06 PM ET

Some patients question propofol, doctor says

With the opening of the trial for Michael Jackson's doctor Conrad Murray, we'll be hearing the word "propofol" a lot again.

The Los Angeles County coroner ruled that the pop superstar died on June 25, 2009 from "acute propofol intoxication." The anesthetic was among the drugs found in Jackson's body at the time of his death, according to the autopsy toxicology report.

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The many possible causes of bedwetting
September 27th, 2011
02:17 PM ET

The many possible causes of bedwetting

Lisa Shives, M.D., is the founder of Northshore Sleep Medicine in Evanston, Illinois. She blogs regularly on The Chart. Read more from her at Dr. Lisa Shives’ Sleep Better Blog.

Her parents were concerned that she had a serious medical or psychological problem, but the only thing that Lori cared about was being able to go to sleepovers without dying of embarrassment.

Lori was 9 years old and was still wetting the bed several times a week.
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Not conforming to gender is not a disorder, says group
September 27th, 2011
01:57 PM ET

Not conforming to gender is not a disorder, says group

People who do not conform to their gender roles or cultural expectations do not have a disorder, declared the health association for professionals who treat transgender patients.

The World Professional Association for Transgender Health, composed of doctors, psychologists and others professionals, updated its standard of care for the first time in 10 years and announced its revisions this week at its conference in Atlanta, Georgia.  This international group, called WPATH, meets every two years.

“People who don’t fit cultural expectations of what it means to be male or female are not inherently disordered,” said Eli Coleman, who chaired a committee to update the WPATH standard of care. “Society stigmatizes these individuals and we have prejudice and discrimination. This causes a lot of people distress.” FULL POST


Too young to know your gender?
The story of 11-year-old Tammy who was born a boy and is now living as a girl sheds some light on the issue of childhood transgender issues
September 27th, 2011
12:36 PM ET

Too young to know your gender?

Comments of the morning:

“I applaud these parents for loving their child for who she is and allowing her to find herself rather than forcing her to suppress all of her feelings and be ‘normal.’" - WowMe

“If God wanted him to be her, God would of created you as such. Going against Gods word is dangerous!” - The9thSeal

Little boy lives as little girl

Hindered by a speech impediment, it wasn’t until age 3 that Thomas Lobel, by learning sign language, could communicate with his parents and the first thing he told them was that he was a girl. Eight years later, Thomas now goes by Tammy and lives as a girl, a process that has been difficult for her parents; the balance of supporting their child and taking criticism from family and friends can be painful and confusing.

So what do CNN.com readers think about their decision to support Tammy’s wishes to live as a girl? Some said they fully support it, while others said that, among other things, Tammy is too young to fully understand gender.

bojimbo261 said, “Children know more than adults do.”

flipnap2112 said, “I am a 42-year-old man. Some of the ways I acted and dressed would have had these adults convincing me I’m transgender. But back then my parents just laughed, didn’t assign a thing to my behavior and I grew up as normal as one can. I’m as heterosexual as one can get. Why are you doing MRIs and brain scans. They’re kids!”

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Sleep-deprived teens take more risks
September 27th, 2011
07:19 AM ET

Sleep-deprived teens take more risks

It’s not uncommon for teens to stay up late – finishing school assignments, talking or emailing with friends, being involved in social activities, or working a job.

A study published in Preventive Medicine reveals that more than two-thirds of U.S. teens report they’re getting less than eight hours sleep on school nights, and researchers say that lack of sufficient sleep is associated with risky behaviors such as smoking, drinking alcohol, being sexually active, using marijuana, lower physical activity, and feeling sad or helpless.

“Insufficient sleep on school nights is common and is associated with participation in health risk behaviors including substance use, fighting, and consideration of suicide,” according to lead author Lela R. McKnight-Eily of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, who explained that while previous research revealed the large sleep deficit experienced by many teens, this is the first large-scale national research to associate a variety sleep behaviors among teens with health risk behaviors using Youth Risk Behavior Survey data. Other studies have made this link with some of the risk behaviors studied, but generally much smaller or non-national samples.

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Get a behind-the-scenes look at the latest stories from CNN Chief Medical Correspondent, Dr. Sanjay Gupta, Senior Medical Correspondent Elizabeth Cohen and the CNN Medical Unit producers. They'll share news and views on health and medical trends - info that will help you take better care of yourself and the people you love.

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