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New AIDS vaccine study results promising
September 13th, 2011
06:02 PM ET

New AIDS vaccine study results promising

After 2 years of analyzing the results of the largest AIDS vaccine clinical trial ever held – called RV144 - researchers say they have found 2 ways the immune system can respond, which could predict whether those inoculated will be protected or are more likely to become infected with HIV.

The new data was released at the annual AIDS Vaccine conference, the largest scientific venue that brings together the world's top scientists, policy makers, community advocates and funders who focus exclusively on AIDS vaccine research. The conference is hosted by the Global HIV Vaccine Enterprise.  This year's co-hosts are Mahidol University where RV144 trial was conducted and Thailand's Ministry of Public Health.

According to the World Health Organization (WHO), in 2009 33.3 million people were living with HIV, there were 2.6 million new infections and 1.8 million AIDS-related deaths worldwide. Since the epidemic started more than 60 million people have been infected and nearly 30 million have died of the disease.

RV-144 was a phase III clinical trial of more than 16,000 healthy Thai adults. Trial results that were released in September 2009 found the vaccine was 31% effective in preventing HIV infections. Study investigators called it "modestly protective."  They also suggested the study provided proof that a vaccine might be possible. Since then researchers have culled data from the study looking for clues as to why the vaccine protected some but not others.   In this new study, they found that the vaccine produced 2 types of immune responses: One led to an increased vaccine efficacy, which means the vaccine would prevent infection. The other immune response led to the same infection rate as a placebo, according to Dr. Barton Haynes, Director of the Duke Human Vaccine Institute at Duke University School of Medicine.

Antibodies are proteins made by the immune system to identify and fight off things foreign to the body like viruses and bacteria. 

Barton, who oversaw much of the research, says this new information will be helpful in the design of future clinical trials. "We now have an informed hypothesis, we have signals.  Now we know where we want to go"

The news generated excitement among other scientists at the conference.

"What we now have are clues, why it might work," Dr. Carl Dieffenbach. "Something we haven't had over the last 30 years, so that's very important."

Still, Dieffenbach says, "We cannot put all our eggs in a single basket and we will continue to pursue other approaches."

This latest advance comes on the heels of a number of scientific breakthroughs in HIV/AIDS research.  In 2010, the CAPRISA 004 (Centre for the AIDS Programme of Research In South Africa) showed a 39% reduction in new HIV infections in sexually active, HIV-negative South African women using tenofovir gel, an antiretroviral (ARV) microbicide. Tenofovir helped prevent the virus from reproducing inside cells.

In another 2010 study, the iPrEx trial, men who have sex with men (MSM) took the antiretroviral pill Truvada daily.  HIV transmission was reduced 44% over those who got the placebo. A study in May by the HIV Prevention Trials Network–HPTN 052, found giving people with the infection antiviral therapy reduced the risk of HIV transmission to their uninfected partner by 96%.  And this summer, more positive news from two separate trials.  In Botswana the PrEP or pre-exposure prophylaxis trial found heterosexuals reduced their risk of infection by 63% if the uninfected partner took an antiretroviral drug daily. In Kenya and Uganda, a separate PrEP study using different ARV drugs also found between 62-73% fewer infections in couples with one infected partner.

But some researchers here say the vaccine is still the "holy grail." Which is why this news is getting such buzz at the conference.

"It's exciting because it's the first time getting a glimpse of how an HIV vaccine works." Catherine Hankins, Chief Scientific Advisor, UNIAIDS said. "We need a vaccine if we are going to end the epidemic."

Haynes says the next step is to continue mining the data for clues that will help them determine how researchers can anticipate what will happen in future trials.

"Vaccines like HIV are difficult [to develop] because of the nature of the bug. It's requiring a more intense effort. There has never been a vaccine against a retrovirus in humans, so this is a new paradigm."

But even with this modest advance researchers say, there's still a lot to be done before a vaccine is ready globally and for the general public.


soundoff (5 Responses)
  1. Scott Sutherland

    We need to make an idividual Aids Vaccine. The vaccine should be based upon killed Aids Virus similar to the vaccine that Jonas Salk created for polio and Louis Pasteur did for the rabies virus. The Aids Virus can be harvested by using a dialysis machine to take whole blood and plasma from Aids patients. A centrifuge can then separate the Aids Virus from the blood and plasma, leaving the water portion of the whole blood with the Aids Virus. Exposure to radiation or ultra violet light will kill the Aids Virus without altering its underlying structure so it can be used for a vaccine. The radiation or ultra violet light will cause the electrons in the Aids Virus to jump to a new orbit thus killing the Aids Virus. The radiation or ultra violet light may alter the nuclear spin of the elements inside the Aids Virus and also killing it that way. The most impoartant part of this treatment is not to kill too many antibodies. Heat will also kill the Aids Virus but may alter the Aids Virus. The other safe way to kill the Aids Virus is to use alcohol but it may also alter the Aids Virus. Also the alcohol and Aids Virus must be put in a centrifuge to separate the alcohol and Aids Virus, so that the alcohol can be reused. There are other chemical compounds to use but they also may alter the Aids Virus. The vaccine based upon the dead virus will allow the body's own system to build up its own antibodies to protect people from the Aids Virus and possible to cure them of Aids just as Louis Pasteur did for people infected by rabies. Doing over 260 days of dialyis treatments over a year or longer may be needed. The only two places on the Aids Virus for the antibodies to attack is where the Aids Virus attaches to the white blood cell and where there is not a hydrocarbon coating on the Aids spike. This idea is the only idea that can deal with the ever changing Aids Virus mutation

    September 18, 2011 at 16:41 | Report abuse | Reply
  2. eric hufford

    AIDS not aids and its called HIV not the AIDS virus

    September 19, 2011 at 14:50 | Report abuse | Reply
  3. JohnAdled

    http://www.Idonthaveasite.com – Nosite Excellent post! Really loved it, havent seen an artice this good in a while.

    April 23, 2012 at 02:21 | Report abuse | Reply
  4. Dr Amin Hamza

    Truthfully, i was tested HIV + positive last 3 years. I keep on managing the drugs i usually purchase from the health care agency to keep me healthy and strengthen, i tried all i can too make this disease leave me alone, but unfortunately, it keep on eating up my life, this is what i caused myself, for allowing my fiance make sex to me insecurely without protection, although i never knew he is HIV positive. So last few 4 days i came in contact with a lively article on the internet on how this Powerful Herb Healer get her well and healed. So as a patient i knew this will took my life 1 day, and i need to live with other friends and relatives too. So i copied out the Dr Amin Hamza the traditional healer’s via email: drcuresickness@gmail.com and I mailed him immediately, in a little while he mail me back that i was welcome to his temple home were by all what i seek for are granted. I was please at that time. And i continue with him, he took some few details from me and told me that he shall get back to me as soon as he is through with my work. I was very happy as heard that from him. So Yesterday, as i was just coming from my friends house, Dr Amin Hamza called me to go for checkup in the hospital and see his marvelous work that it is now HIV negative, i was very glad to hear that from him, so i quickly rush down to the nearest hospital to found out, only to hear from my hospital doctor called Browning Lewis that i am now HIV NEGATIVE. I jump up at him with the test note, he ask me how does it happen and i recede to him all i went through with Dr Amin Hamza I am now glad, so i am a gentle type of person that need to share this testimonies to everyone who seek for healing, because once you get calm and quiet, so the disease get to finish your life off. So i will advise you to contact him Today for your healing at the above details: Email ID: drcuresickness@gmail.com CONTACT HIM NOW TO SAVE YOUR LIFE: drcuresickness@gmail.com AS HE IS SO POWERFUL AND HELPFUL TO ALL THAT HAVE THIS SICKNESS.

    October 27, 2013 at 23:29 | Report abuse | Reply
  5. Adrian Fourie

    Please note that I have copyright for the idea of inserting an ultraviolet light stent into a major artery to kill the Aids virus in the body. You can read more about this if you view my website luckydays dot tv. Thank you.

    October 23, 2014 at 10:41 | Report abuse | Reply

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