home
RSS
September 7th, 2011
06:59 PM ET

Can you develop asthma later in life?

Every weekday, a CNNHealth expert doctor answers a viewer question. On Wednesdays, it's Dr. Otis Brawley, chief medical officer at the American Cancer Society.

Question from  Chuck, Columbus, Ohio

I am in 55 and just started having difficulty breathing on occasion. I am a usually healthy, slightly overweight, never smoker. Could I have developed asthma at this age?

Expert answer

FULL POST


September 7th, 2011
03:51 PM ET

Gupta: 9/11 then and now

Editor's note: Dr. Sanjay Gupta investigates 9/11's toxic dust - what it felt like to breathe it, be enveloped by it, and what the experience means for the next time disaster strikes, in "Terror in the Dust," Saturday, 9 p.m. ET.

I still remember the patient I was examining on the morning of September 11, 2001. She was in her 70s and had a relatively small, benign tumor known as a meningioma. It was located in the right frontal lobe of her brain and I had performed an operation the day before to remove it. I remember her face as I walked in the door. She was sitting up in bed, and had applied lipstick. “Positive lipstick sign,” I had whispered to my residents. I had learned over the years that if a patient was feeling and recovering well, she would be more likely to comb her hair and put on lipstick. This was a good sign for my patient.

A curtain separated two beds in the room and both had televisions in front, bolted to the lime green walls. For whatever reason, I still vividly remember the color of the walls. At different points in our lives, time moves more slowly and becomes unforgettable. Every detail seared into our memory. This was one of those moments.

I had asked my patient to flex her muscle as I tested the bicep strength in her left arm. I was now asking her to extend her arm, while I was feeling to see if all three heads of her triceps muscle were contracting. I remember the moment when there was a collective gasp in the room, and I looked up, wondering if something had happened. My patient’s eyes were fixed on the TV.

FULL POST


Don't let others stress you out
September 7th, 2011
02:35 PM ET

Don't let others stress you out

Editor's note: CNN contributor Amanda Enayati ponders the theme of seeking serenity - the quest for well-being and life balance in stressful times.

When I tell Pam, my stressed-out lawyer friend, that stress is contagious, she seems unimpressed.

“I have always kind of suspected that,” she says, “ever since in 'Ghostbusters II,' when the guys discover that people’s nonstop negativity has created an evil slime that threatens humanity. Then they find out the slime reacts to both positive and negative emotions, so they have a bunch of New Yorkers hold hands and sing ‘Kumbaya’ to it in Central Park or something. And boom! The slime dissolves.”

I’m sort of speechless, though the comparison is oddly compelling.
FULL POST


Advertisement
About this blog

Get a behind-the-scenes look at the latest stories from CNN Chief Medical Correspondent, Dr. Sanjay Gupta, Senior Medical Correspondent Elizabeth Cohen and the CNN Medical Unit producers. They'll share news and views on health and medical trends - info that will help you take better care of yourself and the people you love.

Advertisement
Advertisement