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LGBT topics get little time in med school
September 6th, 2011
04:51 PM ET

LGBT topics get little time in med school

Lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender patients present unique challenges to treating physicians, but their specific needs may not be getting enough attention in some medical schools.

44 medical schools reported dedicating no teaching time to LGBT-related content during clinical years, and in preclinical curricula, nine medical schools reported spending no time on LGBT issues, according to a study published Tuesday in the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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September 6th, 2011
04:11 PM ET

Human Factor: Family vows to live for dying boys

In the Human Factor, we profile survivors who have overcome the odds. Confronting a life obstacle – injury, illness or other hardship – they tapped their inner strength and found resilience they didn't know they possessed. This week, meet the Leider family, who had it all and then faced the most trying of times, only to end up helping others during their grief.

Love, marriage and a family! That was our dream, and we believed it came true.

Our family began August 23, 2006 with an amazing little boy, Jason Jeffrey, and then came our little prince Justin Jay, on February 25, 2009. These two little boys became our new love, a joy completely unimaginable. We hugged, kissed, played, read, giggled, tickled, and celebrated life like a normal family. Our perfect family, living out our dream, so we thought!

January 2011 our normal life became anything but. Our dream turned into the worst possible nightmare a parent could have. We received news that shattered our family as well as our life long dreams. Our perfect little boys were diagnosed with an extremely rare and fatal genetic disease known as mucopolysaccharidoses-2, also known as MPS II or Hunter‘s syndrome.

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Filed under: Children's Health • Human Factor

Fewer Americans are smoking, CDC finds
September 6th, 2011
02:56 PM ET

Fewer Americans are smoking, CDC finds

The number of adults in the United States who smoke declined by about 1.5%, or 3 million people, from 2005 to 2010, according to a new report from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. The CDC also found that the number of habitual smokers - those who light up 30 or more cigarettes a day - dropped from 13% in 2005 to 8% in 2010.

"About one-third of all current smokers may die from cigarette use unless they quit promptly," CDC Director Dr. Thomas Frieden said. "So we're talking about preventing more than a million deaths because of that decline."
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Why your plastic surgeon won't operate on you
September 6th, 2011
12:07 PM ET

Why your plastic surgeon won't operate on you

Anthony Youn, M.D., is a plastic surgeon in Metro Detroit. He is the author of “In Stitches,” a humorous memoir about growing up Asian American and becoming a doctor.

I make my living operating on people, but I don’t accept everyone.

I turn down one out of every five patients who consult me for cosmetic plastic surgery. Mostly I say no because of a patient’s unrealistic expectations.

“Dr. Youn, I’ve had five children. I’ve breastfed all of them and now my breasts droop down to my waist. I want my breasts lifted and perky. I want them to feel as firm as they did when I was 16. Oh, and no scars, please.”
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About this blog

Get a behind-the-scenes look at the latest stories from CNN Chief Medical Correspondent, Dr. Sanjay Gupta, Senior Medical Correspondent Elizabeth Cohen and the CNN Medical Unit producers. They'll share news and views on health and medical trends - info that will help you take better care of yourself and the people you love.

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