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September 30th, 2011
06:55 PM ET

Quiz: Wine and women, winter weight, water, and more

This week's quiz is brought to you by the letter W.

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Filed under: Health Quiz

What the Yuck: Scented soap 'down there'?
September 30th, 2011
01:17 PM ET

What the Yuck: Scented soap 'down there'?

Too embarrassed to ask your doctor about sex, body quirks, or the latest celeb health fad? In a regular feature and a new book, "What the Yuck?!," Health magazine medical editor Dr. Roshini Raj tackles your most personal and provocative questions. Send 'em to Dr. Raj at whattheyuck@health.com.

Q: Is it OK to use scented shower gel "down there"?

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September 30th, 2011
11:32 AM ET

Human Factor: 'American Idol's' Casey Abrams on life with a digestive disease

In the Human Factor, we profile survivors who have overcome the odds. Confronting a life obstacle - injury, illness or other hardship - they tapped their inner strength and found resilience they didn't know they possessed. This week, "American Idol" contestant Casey Abrams shares his story about his struggles with the chronic digestive disease, ulcerative colitis.

Every time I perform on the big stage, I think about that little college freshman who never thought he’d play his bass and sing for people again.

Before my music career even started, I almost had to give it all up. Millions watched me on TV and got to know me as a performer. What most people don’t know is that way before I performed with Jack Black, kissed J. Lo or got the judges’ one and only save, I was a college freshman studying what I love most - music - when I started having major health issues.
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September 30th, 2011
07:45 AM ET

Rogen: We wanted to make a personal movie

Check out Dr. Sanjay Gupta's chat with longtime friends Seth Rogen and Will Reiser. The duo share memories of  funny moments from Reiser's s real-life battle with cancer, why they were inspired to write and produce this weekend's new movie, "50/50," and ask Gupta some of their own medical questions.


Filed under: TV-Sanjay Gupta MD

Twitter shows how the world is feeling
September 29th, 2011
02:01 PM ET

Twitter shows how the world is feeling

Weekends are happier times than weekdays, right? That association holds up in new research published in the journal Science that used Twitter to gauge the moods of millions of people.

Researchers at Cornell University looked at tweets from all Twitter users who created accounts between February 2008 and April 2009, weeding out those who tweeted fewer than 25 messages. In total, they looked at 509 million messages written by 2.4 million people. Then they matched words from those tweets to an established word list that psychologists use to gauge positive and negative moods.

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When Mom or Dad wades back in the dating pool
September 29th, 2011
07:34 AM ET

When Mom or Dad wades back in the dating pool

Ian Kerner, a sexuality counselor and New York Times best-selling author, blogs about sex on Thursdays on The Chart. Read more from him on his website, GoodInBed.

When my mother’s long-term boyfriend passed away, I was worried that she might be wary of taking another chance on romance. So when I learned that she’d rekindled an old flame and had fallen in love again, I felt relieved.

I was happy that she had found a partner and companion - someone to go on dinner and movie dates with, to take to family functions, and yes, even to enjoy physical intimacy with again.

Not everyone is so enthusiastic about one parent dating again after the other parent has died, however. In fact, many people feel confused, disappointed, and even angry when Mom or Dad steps back into the dating scene.
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What you need to know about Listeria monocytogenes
September 28th, 2011
12:35 PM ET

What you need to know about Listeria monocytogenes

With an outbreak of sickness linked to  bacteria-tainted cantaloupe now reported in more than a dozen states, here's a quick backgrounder on listeria monocytogenes.

What is it?
Listeria monocytogenes is a “hardy” bacterium that is resistant to extreme hot and cold. This bacterium is pathogenic – meaning that it is infectious to humans, causing the illness listeriosis.

Where does it come from?
Listeria is found in soil, water and the intestines of some animals. Unfortunately, most animals show no symptoms so the bacterium is transferred to raw foods such as unpasteurized dairy products, raw vegetables and raw meats. And unlike similar types of bacteria, listeria can grow in the low temperatures of a refrigerator.

Studies also suggest that up to 10% of humans may be carriers. The FDA says that when listeria gets into a factory environment it can live for several years.

But how did it get inside of cantaloupes?
Cantaloupes and other fruits with porous surfaces can become infected by listeria when soil and/or water seeps through their skin. Any bacterium that remains on the outside can be transferred from the shell to the inside when the fruit is sliced open by a knife or handled.
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September 27th, 2011
05:06 PM ET

Some patients question propofol, doctor says

With the opening of the trial for Michael Jackson's doctor Conrad Murray, we'll be hearing the word "propofol" a lot again.

The Los Angeles County coroner ruled that the pop superstar died on June 25, 2009 from "acute propofol intoxication." The anesthetic was among the drugs found in Jackson's body at the time of his death, according to the autopsy toxicology report.

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The many possible causes of bedwetting
September 27th, 2011
02:17 PM ET

The many possible causes of bedwetting

Lisa Shives, M.D., is the founder of Northshore Sleep Medicine in Evanston, Illinois. She blogs regularly on The Chart. Read more from her at Dr. Lisa Shives’ Sleep Better Blog.

Her parents were concerned that she had a serious medical or psychological problem, but the only thing that Lori cared about was being able to go to sleepovers without dying of embarrassment.

Lori was 9 years old and was still wetting the bed several times a week.
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Not conforming to gender is not a disorder, says group
September 27th, 2011
01:57 PM ET

Not conforming to gender is not a disorder, says group

People who do not conform to their gender roles or cultural expectations do not have a disorder, declared the health association for professionals who treat transgender patients.

The World Professional Association for Transgender Health, composed of doctors, psychologists and others professionals, updated its standard of care for the first time in 10 years and announced its revisions this week at its conference in Atlanta, Georgia.  This international group, called WPATH, meets every two years.

“People who don’t fit cultural expectations of what it means to be male or female are not inherently disordered,” said Eli Coleman, who chaired a committee to update the WPATH standard of care. “Society stigmatizes these individuals and we have prejudice and discrimination. This causes a lot of people distress.” FULL POST


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Get a behind-the-scenes look at the latest stories from CNN Chief Medical Correspondent, Dr. Sanjay Gupta, Senior Medical Correspondent Elizabeth Cohen and the CNN Medical Unit producers. They'll share news and views on health and medical trends - info that will help you take better care of yourself and the people you love.

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