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August 26th, 2011
03:21 PM ET

Quiz: August is Immunization Awareness Month

This week's Health Quiz: Steve Jobs' health, premature babies, child window accidents, vaccines and more.

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Filed under: Health Quiz

August 26th, 2011
11:02 AM ET

Music clears mind for Alzheimer's researcher

As world-class doctors mingled with entrepreneurs and technology innovators at the last TEDMED conference, beautiful piano music filled the ballroom during a snack break. I assumed TEDMED had hired a professional  pianist to entertain us, but I realized my error when I got closer to the source: It was renowned Alzheimer's researcher Rudolph Tanzi trying out the shiny red instrument for fun. I also took a turn, but was quickly outdone - the piano's proprietor came over to say he mistook Tanzi's playing for Elton John's.

Tanzi leads the Alzheimer's Genome Project, a groundbreaking initiative in collaboration with the Cure Alzheimer's Fund that is dedicated to finding genes associated with Alzheimer's disease. Once scientists identify what's going wrong with those genes in people who have the condition, they can work toward developing drugs that may repair the damage. "The idea is fix what’s broken," Tanzi said.

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What the Yuck: Will staring at a computer make me blind?
August 26th, 2011
07:31 AM ET

What the Yuck: Will staring at a computer make me blind?

Too embarrassed to ask your doctor about sex, body quirks, or the latest celeb health fad? In a regular feature and a new book, "What the Yuck?!," Health magazine medical editor Dr. Roshini Raj tackles your most personal and provocative questions. Send 'em to Dr. Raj at whattheyuck@health.com.

I stare at my computer for at least 14 hours a day. Am I going to go blind?

Staring at a computer screen can certainly cause eyestrain and fatigue, but you won't go blind. Instead, your eyes may feel tired or you may get eye pain or headaches. And of course, squinting may lead to wrinkles.
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Deaths are a reminder of food allergy dangers
August 26th, 2011
07:30 AM ET

Deaths are a reminder of food allergy dangers

Sloane Miller, MFA, MSW, LMSW is an author, food allergy advocate and life coach. She works with people of all ages to manage their food allergies safely and effectively while still having fun. Her book, Allergic Girl: Adventures in Living Well With Food Allergies and her award-winning blog, Please Don't Pass the Nuts, offer advice in understanding and living well with food allergies.

The untimely, tragic and preventable deaths last week of two young men in Georgia highlight the seriousness of food allergies and the need for people with food allergies to have an Emergency Allergy Action Plan.

By local news accounts, Jharrell Dillard, 15 from Lawrenceville, Georgia and Tyler Davis, 20 studying at Kennesaw State University, knew what they were allergic to and were vigilant about what they ate. But this one time, without knowing it, they ate something containing their allergen and, caught without an auotinjector of epinephrine, perished.

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About this blog

Get a behind-the-scenes look at the latest stories from CNN Chief Medical Correspondent, Dr. Sanjay Gupta, Senior Medical Correspondent Elizabeth Cohen and the CNN Medical Unit producers. They'll share news and views on health and medical trends - info that will help you take better care of yourself and the people you love.

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