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Bran, soy help cut cholesterol
August 23rd, 2011
05:13 PM ET

Bran, soy help cut cholesterol

Editor's note: Tune in as Dr. Sanjay Gupta explores the signs, tests and lifestyle changes that could make cardiac problems a thing of the past on "The Last Heart Attack," Saturday, August 27, 8 and 11 p.m. ET on CNN.

Researchers in Canada have shown that a special cholesterol-lowering diet works well – even with only two nutritional counseling sessions over six months.

Making dietary changes like eating oat bran for breakfast, drinking soy milk instead of dairy, soy burgers in place of hamburgers, and fruit and nuts instead of a full lunch prompted a double-digit drop in both total cholesterol and LDL or "bad" cholesterol.

The study was published Tuesday in the Journal of the American Medical Association.

Lead author Dr. David Jenkins, Canada research chair in nutrition and metabolism at the University of Toronto and St. Michael's Hospital, had previously shown the effectiveness of a cholesterol-lowering diet when all the meals were provided to participants.

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NY, DC briefly shaken by 9/11 memories during earthquake
A law enforcement officer directs evacuating New Yorkers during Tuesday's earthquake
August 23rd, 2011
04:47 PM ET

NY, DC briefly shaken by 9/11 memories during earthquake

Tuesday's earthquake was an uncomfortable albeit brief déjà-vu for many in New York City and Washington, D.C.

Workers dashed out of buildings, many of them worried that the tremors from a 5.8-magnitude  earthquake that struck the East Coast was a bomb or terrorist attack.

When Ellen Rea first felt her New York apartment shake, she dismissed it as a neighbor running on the treadmill. The tremors got stronger and a door in her apartment popped open.  She panicked.

“I’m not a person who gets scared, but I thought of 9/11 and thought what the hell happened?” Rea said.

She remembered being near the World Trade Center nearly 10 years ago and coming home with the ashes in her hair.

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Bisexual men: Science says they're real
August 23rd, 2011
04:24 PM ET

Bisexual men: Science says they're real

Plenty of people identify as bisexual, but scientists are still trying to figure out what that means in terms of physiological arousal and attraction.

A new study in the journal Biological Psychology claims to have at least shown that some men who say they're bisexual actually get aroused by both men and women. And that's a new result; a controversial 2005 study could not demonstrate bisexuality.

This study does find it, perhaps because of the way researchers recruited participants. The new research focuses on self-identified bisexual men who'd had a romantic relationship of at least three months with at least one person of each sex, and at least two sexual partners of each sex - much more specific criteria than previous research used.

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August 23rd, 2011
01:29 PM ET

Could my bipolar brother develop schizophrenia?

Every weekday, a CNNHealth expert doctor answers a viewer question. On Tuesdays, it's Dr. Charles Raison, an associate professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences at Emory University, and an expert in the mind-body connection for health.

Question asked by Benjamin from St. Catharines, Ontario

I was wondering if my brother, who we have been told is bipolar, could develop schizophrenia? My uncle, my mom's brother, was schizophrenic and unfortunately fell victim to the mental illness. We are aware that there have been some mental health issues with males on my mother's side of the family, so could it be possible that he could be schizophrenic as well as bipolar?
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Self-injury: A silent epidemic
August 23rd, 2011
12:08 PM ET

Self-injury: A silent epidemic

Editor's note: Ethnographers Patricia and Peter Adler drew on 150 interviews with self-injurers from all over the world, along with 30,000 to 40,000 internet posts in chat rooms and communiqués to write "The Tender Cut: Inside the World of Self-Injury."

For the last 10 years we have been studying self-injury: the deliberate, non-suicidal destruction of one’s own body tissue, such as self-cutting, burning, branding, scratching, picking at skin, re-opening wounds, biting, head-banging, hair-pulling, self-hitting, swallowing or embedding objects, breaking bones or teeth, tearing or severely biting cuticles or nails, and chewing the inside of the mouth.

When teens embed objects in their skin

Our research, just published as "The Tender Cut," offers the widest base of knowledge about this behavior, based on over 135 in-depth life history interviews with self-injurers located all over the world and tens of thousands of Internet messages and e-mails including those posted publicly and those written to and by us.
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August 23rd, 2011
07:33 AM ET

Human Factor: A bridge from dyslexia

In the Human Factor,  we profile survivors who have overcome the odds. Confronting a life obstacle – injury, illness or other hardship - they tapped their inner strength and found resilience they didn't know they possessed. This week Ben Foss shares how his own disability led him to invent a device that helps others who share his condition.

People like to say that I have overcome dyslexia.  Nothing could be further from the truth.

What I have overcome is the mainstream world. A person in a wheelchair overcomes stairs with a ramp. In the same way, I have overcome people who think dyslexia equals lazy.

This experience is why I am now the executive director of Disability Rights Advocates, a national legal center that tries to get people to do what they should have done in the first place, i.e., include people with disabilities in the mainstream.

Eighteen veterans a day commit suicide. We are fighting to make sure that the Department of Veterans Affairs provides the services vets with disabilities such as post-traumatic stress disorder or traumatic brain injury deserve. In New York, they are about to replace all the cabs in the city with vans, but they have not picked one with a ramp built-in.

Wheelchair users can use 100% of the cabs in London, but less than 2% of those in NYC. That is wrong. For 17 years DRA has been fighting for equal access to work and school for all.
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About this blog

Get a behind-the-scenes look at the latest stories from CNN Chief Medical Correspondent, Dr. Sanjay Gupta, Senior Medical Correspondent Elizabeth Cohen and the CNN Medical Unit producers. They'll share news and views on health and medical trends - info that will help you take better care of yourself and the people you love.

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