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August 12th, 2011
03:49 PM ET

Quiz: Downside of the the age of anti-bacteria

Products like antimicrobial wipes have wiped out (pun intended!) some of our former microscopic friends - who were those petri dish dwellers? Also, do you know what can can reduce your baby's odds of becoming overweight? Take this week's Health Quiz and find out!

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Filed under: Health Quiz

Five tips for breaking in your FiveFinger shoes
August 12th, 2011
03:13 PM ET

Five tips for breaking in your FiveFinger shoes

My calves hurt. Every time I take a step the left one, which I’ve nicknamed “whiny,” begs for me to stop. And there’s a constant throbbing coming from the muscles in the arches of my feet. I didn’t even know my arches had muscles.

I owe this painful discovery to my new FiveFinger shoes. Remember toe socks? They’re like those, except designed to be used outdoors.

The salesperson at the REI store where I purchased my shoes issued a warning: Make sure to break them in slowly. A similar one is posted on the Vibram website - run no more than 10% of your typical distance for the first two to three weeks; never run two days in a row in the first month; stretch before and after each run, focusing on your calves and feet.

See where this is going?
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Medical journals retracting more research
August 12th, 2011
10:27 AM ET

Medical journals retracting more research

You may trust what your doctors tell you, but studies show they might be working off bad information.

Physicians and researchers share breakthroughs in medical science and treatments in journals.  Sometimes, however, these publications have to retract stories when they turn out to be wrong.  The number or retractions is going up according to a Wall Street Journal investigation conducted by Thomson Reuters.   It says there were only 22 retractions in 2001, but 339 last year – a fifteenfold increase.

John Budd’s research also shows an increase over time.  He’s a professor at the University of Missouri who spent years studying why publications are retracted.  He found that between 1997 and 2008, 47% of the articles were pulled because of  "misconduct or presumed misconduct."  Errors accounted for 25 %;  21% were taken down because the authors could not get the same results consistently.  The remaining 7% were unclassified.

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The 'easy' childbirth: One mom's story
Jennifer Seitz's son J.J. arrived after three pushes in less than seven minutes.
August 12th, 2011
09:56 AM ET

The 'easy' childbirth: One mom's story

Editor's note: Jennifer Seitz is a senior editor at CNN.com, and the mother of three.

Birth stories are more than just the epic tale of how we all got here. They’re a way of sharing one of the most profound experiences of life.

I’ve heard many, many of them, and not just on hospital visits to see friends with newborns, but also upon meeting new friends or coworkers who gave birth years ago, and even unsolicited from strangers for simply walking around pregnant.

I’m not an expert on childbirth, but I’ve done it three times. And I’ve watched many of them (TLC’s “A Baby Story” is many a pregnant lady’s addictive TV, especially the closer she gets to the due date.)

Websites abound to share birth stories, too, just to meet the demand of people who are compelled to talk about them and others who are desperate to know as much as they can about them, maybe in preparation for their first.

Why? Because, wow, it’s scary. Fear of the unimaginable, unbearable pain we’ve heard so much about makes us afraid of giving birth. Some young women say they will never have children because they can’t imagine going through such an inconceivable thing. I was one of those.

But then, when you are pregnant, you try to talk yourself out of all those years of conditioning as the due date looms. The excitement is accompanied by panicky anticipation.

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August 12th, 2011
07:40 AM ET

Why do I always think about food?

Every weekday, a CNNHealth expert doctor answers a viewer question. On Friday, it's Dr. Melina Jampolis, a physician nutrition specialist.

Question asked by Jamie K.

I have a question/problem regarding overeating. Being a college student and food science major, I am constantly thinking about food. I currently play Ultimate Frisbee and occasionally play badminton and go running. I eat extremely healthy, but the problem is I constantly think of food. Therefore, I overeat, and I gained 16 pounds in less than two years. Is there any way to control my self-will? I would like to lose 10 pounds. I am 5 feet 3 and 120 pounds, but it's not like I can cut out unhealthy food in my diet. Eating less is difficult because I do not want to go into starvation mode. Quick advice please?

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About this blog

Get a behind-the-scenes look at the latest stories from CNN Chief Medical Correspondent, Dr. Sanjay Gupta, Senior Medical Correspondent Elizabeth Cohen and the CNN Medical Unit producers. They'll share news and views on health and medical trends - info that will help you take better care of yourself and the people you love.

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