home
RSS
Why does toxicology take so long?
July 25th, 2011
05:07 PM ET

Why does toxicology take so long?

Lab tests to determine what killed singer Amy Winehouse will take  two to four weeks, according to the Scotland Yard.

Unlike television crime shows where results are instant, standard toxicology tests can require several steps, taking up to several weeks.

An autopsy completed Monday afternoon was inconclusive and investigators will need the toxicology results to determine the singer’s cause of death, according to a police statement. FULL POST


July 25th, 2011
03:25 PM ET

High-profile longevity study retracted

It sounded like a breakthrough when researchers from Boston University reported that they had identified genes associated with living to 100 or even longer.  The findings, reported in the well-respected journal Science in July 2010, received a great deal of publicity.

But now, after coming under intense criticism, the study authors have retracted their findings because their  results aren't as dramatic as initially thought.

FULL POST


Tri Challenge: Breathe deeply to conquer wet suit anxiety
July 25th, 2011
03:10 PM ET

Tri Challenge: Breathe deeply to conquer wet suit anxiety

Since January, six iReporters have been training in the Fit Nation Triathlon Challenge. We’re following along as they prepare to compete alongside Dr. Sanjay Gupta in the August 7 Nautica NYC Triathlon.

Well here we are, staring down less than two weeks until we jump into the Hudson River! Wet suits are allowed for this race as long as the water temp is below 78°F, and because the water temp has not reached this level in the history of the NYC Tri, we 6-Packers have all included wet suit swims in our training.

We swam in them several times while in Hawaii in April, including the mini-tri we did on our last day there. That swim did not go well for me, and I have come to decide that it was due to “wet suit anxiety.” Frankly, I have more anxiety about the swim than I have admitted to myself and others.

The first time I put on my wet suit in Hawaii (actually it was the second time; the first time we all put them on backwards and had to start over), I was comfortable swimming in it in the ocean. But on the day we did our mini-tri, something changed, and I found myself hyperventilating on the swim. I think I had started out swimming too fast, got winded, and then blamed the tight fit of the wet suit for not being able to catch my breath when actually I couldn’t catch it because I was hyperventilating.

FULL POST


23-state Salmonella outbreak linked to papaya
July 25th, 2011
01:43 PM ET

23-state Salmonella outbreak linked to papaya

Contaminated papaya appears to be the cause of an outbreak of Salmonella in 23 states the Food and Drug Administration is warning consumers. The FDA says papayas imported from Mexico and distributed by Agromod Produce Inc. of McAllen, Texas, is likely the source of 97 cases of Salmonella agona. To date 10 people have been hospitalized but there have been no reported deaths. As a result, Agromod Produce has voluntarily recalled all papaya sold before July 23.

The cases were reported between January 1 and July 18 in Arkansas, Arizona, California, Colorado, Georgia, Illinois, Louisiana, Massachusetts, Minnesota, Missouri, Nebraska, Nevada, New Jersey, New Mexico, New York, Ohio. Oklahoma, Pennsylvania, Tennessee, Texas, Virginia, Washington and Wisconsin. While ages ranged from 1 year to 91 years old, the average age of those stricken is 20. More than half of the cases are women. Texas had the most cases with 25 people falling ill.

FULL POST


Kardashian has psoriasis – what is it?
July 25th, 2011
11:46 AM ET

Kardashian has psoriasis – what is it?

Kim Kardashian learned she has psoriasis in an episode of  “Keeping Up with the Kardashians” that aired Sunday.

Alarmed after finding red, itchy patches on her legs, Kardashian heads to the dermatologist.  Dr. Harold Lancer takes one look at the scaly rash and determines she has psoriasis, a common skin disease that causes skin to dry and form itchy spots.

The severity of psoriasis depends on the person – some people can be covered in these patches; other cases can be associated with arthritis.  For others, it’s just a small nuisance.

“I cannot have psoriasis,” Kardashian tells her dermatologist on the show. FULL POST


Filed under: Autoimmune disorder

July 25th, 2011
08:38 AM ET

Is it OK to fly after a head injury?

Every weekday, a CNNHealth expert doctor answers a viewer question. On Mondays, it's pediatrician Dr. Jennifer Shu.

Asked by Liz from Atlanta
My teammate and I collided during a ballgame last weekend, and I blacked out for a few seconds before being taken to the emergency room. They did a CT scan of my head, which was fine. I am still having some headaches but have plans to fly across the country this weekend. Should I cancel my trip?
FULL POST


Deaths from chickenpox down
July 25th, 2011
12:01 AM ET

Deaths from chickenpox down

Deaths from chickenpox (the varicella virus) have dropped 97 percent in adolescents and children since the use of the vaccine began in 1995, new analysis shows.

"I think there's certainly the potential for very little disease in the future and very few deaths if we are to fully implement and maintain that program," said Jane Seward, deputy director, Division of Viral Diseases, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. FULL POST


ADHD kids face greater pedestrian risks
July 25th, 2011
12:01 AM ET

ADHD kids face greater pedestrian risks

Teaching your child to safely cross the street is hard enough, but when your child has ADHD, attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, you may need to worry more about his or her safety. A new study finds children with ADHD are at greater risk when crossing the street. Experts suggest these children have more problems remembering visual tasks and managing their time as they do them.

Accidents are the leading cause of death in children and those with ADHD are much more likely than their peers to be involved. Crossing the street is no exception so researchers decided to create a virtual reality simulation of an intersection and asked children ages 7 – 10 to cross the street.

FULL POST


Advertisement
About this blog

Get a behind-the-scenes look at the latest stories from CNN Chief Medical Correspondent, Dr. Sanjay Gupta, Senior Medical Correspondent Elizabeth Cohen and the CNN Medical Unit producers. They'll share news and views on health and medical trends - info that will help you take better care of yourself and the people you love.

Advertisement
Advertisement