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Diana Nyad: Reaching for a record
July 19th, 2011
09:44 PM ET

Diana Nyad: Reaching for a record

Editor's note: CNN alone will have live coverage of Diana Nyad's Xtreme Dream from aboard the support boats traveling alongside her. Stay with CNN.com and The Chart for more info on  the swim, and to see a live position tracker and live reports from the ocean.

The last year has been full of fits and starts for champion distance swimmer Diana Nyad in her quest to break the world record in open-water swimming, and we've taken you along for the entire ride.

As we shared with you last July, almost a year of intense training – both in a pool and in the ocean – culminated in one final test of her abilities: a 24-hour swim off the coast of Key West. If she could do that, she felt she'd be ready to conquer her "Xtreme Dream," swimming from Cuba to Florida without a shark cage, at age 61. Accomplishing that 103-mile swim would mean breaking the 32-year-old record, set by Diana in 1979, when she swam from the Bahamas to Florida.

The July 10, 2010, swim came and went without a hitch. She jumped into the ocean at 8:19 that morning and emerged victorious and confident at 8:19 a.m. the next day.

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Drug may cut menopause after breast cancer chemo
July 19th, 2011
06:13 PM ET

Drug may cut menopause after breast cancer chemo

Early menopause is often a side effect for women treated with chemotherapy for breast cancer, but a new study reveals some guarded promise for preventing early menopause breast cancer patients. The results are published in the Journal of the American Medical Association.

While most breast cancer is diagnosed at later ages, about 6% of women learn that they're ill before age 40 - when they are still of childbearing age. Breast cancer treatments that have shown the best results for for disease free survival include chemotherapy, hormonal therapy, or both. For younger women still hoping for children, these treatments can cause devastating short-term or long-term loss of menstrual periods, and loss of fertility. While many women choose to preserve the option of having children by storing eggs before cancer treatment, the process can be costly and difficult.

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Tri Challenge: My first mile in Lake Michigan
July 19th, 2011
04:39 PM ET

Tri Challenge: My first mile in Lake Michigan

Since January, six iReporters have been training in the Fit Nation Triathlon Challenge. We’re following along as they prepare to compete alongside Dr. Sanjay Gupta in the August 7 Nautica NYC Triathlon.

I've been trying to swim in Lake Michigan for several weeks now with my swim group but it's been canceled due to bad weather or bad water quality.

Luckily, I met a wonderful person, Nadine Borkowicz, in my swim class, who was training for her first Ironman and we talked about my fear of open water. It seemed that she was worried about the open water as well, and had asked one of her friends, Tom Degan – an Ironman, to swim with her the next day in Lake Michigan. She was so kind to invite me along and I jumped at the chance!

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For Alzheimer’s patients, antidepressants no better than placebo
July 19th, 2011
02:12 PM ET

For Alzheimer’s patients, antidepressants no better than placebo

Two antidepressants commonly prescribed to people with dementia appear to be no better than a sugar pill at easing the symptoms of depression in Alzheimer’s patients, according to a new study published today in the Lancet.

Zoloft (sertraline) and Remeron (mirtazapine), which are both available as generics, also generated more—and more severe—side effects than placebo, leading the researchers to suggest that these and other antidepressants should be reserved for dementia patients whose depression fails to respond to more conservative treatments, such as psychotherapy.

Although it included just 326 patients, the study is the largest placebo-controlled trial to date on antidepressants in people with dementia. In fact, it is nearly as large as all the previous studies on this topic combined, according to an editorial accompanying the study.
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Filed under: Alzheimer's • Health.com

July 19th, 2011
07:22 AM ET

Human Factor: Dreams change for accident victim

In the Human Factor, we profile survivors who have overcome the odds. Confronting a life obstacle - injury, illness or other hardship –- they tapped their inner strength and found resilience they didn’t know they possessed. This week William Carter shares how a head-on collision changed his life's direction.

I was a sophomore in high school when I discovered what I wanted to do: work for the United Nations in some capacity.

From the moment I won my first award from the Model United Nations, I did everything I could to make sure that happened. I participated in more models, winning more awards, and even joined my school’s debate team to assist in my ability at discourse and just to look good on a college application.

I had it all set it out, a life plan that required a bachelor's degree from Wake Forest and a substantial SAT score to make sure that the first part was accessible.
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About this blog

Get a behind-the-scenes look at the latest stories from CNN Chief Medical Correspondent, Dr. Sanjay Gupta, Senior Medical Correspondent Elizabeth Cohen and the CNN Medical Unit producers. They'll share news and views on health and medical trends - info that will help you take better care of yourself and the people you love.

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