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July 18th, 2011
12:52 PM ET

More studies show PrEP prevents HIV infection

The evidence is mounting.  Another study has found that PrEP - pre-exposure prophylaxis - is relatively safe and can prevent HIV transmission in couples where one partner is already infected with the virus.

The data from the study, called the HPTN 052 trial, released Monday in the New England Journal of Medicine  at the International AIDS Society Conference in Rome.  Researchers enrolled nearly 1,800 couples in Botswana, Kenya, Malawi, South Africa, Zimbabwe, Brazil, India, Thailand and the United States.

Fifty-four percent of the couples were from Africa; half of the infected partners were men. Those infected, with CD4 counts between 350 and 550, were randomly broken into two groups. In one group, the infected partner received antiretroviral drugs when they were enrolled. In the other, therapy was delayed until after their CD4 count fell below 250, or they suffered an AIDS related illness.

CD4, or T-Cells are a type of white blood cell that helps the body fight infections like viruses and bacteria. The higher your count, the stronger your immune system which helps reduce complications of HIV. When the CD4 count falls below 200 a person has AIDS.

Researchers found for those who got antiretroviral therapy (ART) early, the rate of transmission dropped by 96% compared with those who were treated later. HIV transmission occurred in just 39 people. Twenty-eight of those were directly linked to the HIV-infected partner. Of that 28, only one was from the group that got early treatment. HIV patients that got early therapy also had less HIV-related illness.

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Tri Challenge: Taking Dad's training to heart
Joaquin Brignoni's young daughter Amalia joins her dad in the pool during his tri training.
July 18th, 2011
12:48 PM ET

Tri Challenge: Taking Dad's training to heart

Since January, six iReporters have been training in the Fit Nation Triathlon Challenge. We’re following along as they prepare to compete alongside Dr. Sanjay Gupta in the August 7 Nautica NYC Triathlon.

My original three reasons to Tri are now trying right by my side.

My daughters have become very interested in my training, and since I started the Tri Challenge my two oldest have learned how to ride bikes and swim.

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Overweight teens less likely to get doctor weight talk
July 18th, 2011
12:27 PM ET

Overweight teens less likely to get doctor weight talk

Government advisory panels today say doctors should talk to their teen patients about weight, about how active they are, their emotions and what they’re eating. But a study in the current issue of Pediatrics found that wasn’t happening for the group that perhaps could have benefited from it most.

Teens who were already obese were more likely than normal-weight teens to receive the screenings. But those verging on obesity were not.

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July 18th, 2011
07:46 AM ET

What are the chances I'm a genius?

Every weekday, a CNNHealth expert doctor answers a viewer question. On Mondays, it's pediatrician Dr. Jennifer Shu.

Asked by Zachary from Portsmouth, Rhode Island
I'm a 14-year-old boy and I was told that I have Asperger's syndrome. The doctors told us that I have the IQ of a borderline genius. On average what are the chances of that happening?
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Kids safer with grandparents behind the wheel
July 18th, 2011
12:01 AM ET

Kids safer with grandparents behind the wheel

Youngsters who are driven by their grandparents are less likely to suffer from serious injury if they're involved in a crash, says a new study in the journal Pediatrics.

Researchers from the University of Pennsylvania, as well as doctors from Children's Hospital of Philadelphia, found even though grandparents are in an older group that has a higher risk of severe crashes, youngsters driven by their grandparents suffered fewer injuries in crashes and were actually safer than children driven by their parents.

“With more and more baby boomers becoming grandparents, we were concerned about children in crashes with grandparents,” says Dr. Fred Henretig, lead author and an attending physician in the Philadelphia hospital's Department of Emergency Medicine.

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Bed sharing with toddler – no harm, no benefit for kids over 1
July 18th, 2011
12:01 AM ET

Bed sharing with toddler – no harm, no benefit for kids over 1

Is it harmful to your child's development to have your toddler sleep with you?  Experts can't seem to agree on whether it’s a good thing or bad but a new study finds that it may not be harmful to children  as long as the child is at least a year old.

It’s called bed-sharing, where parents and a child sleep in the same bed.  It's not as common in the United States as in other countries, but it's more prevalent among certain ethnic groups.

According to the American Academy of Pediatrics, it's not advised for parents to ever sleep with infants before the age of 6 months.  That's the time when babies are most at risk for sudden infant death syndrome.   But the study authors and the AAP agree that once a child is 12 months old , co-sleeping or bed-sharing with parents is really up to the preference of the family.  However, the goal for any sleep arrangement is to get safe, adequate sleep.  If bed-sharing is getting in the way of a good night's sleep or is dangerous in any way for your child, then it's not a good idea.
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About this blog

Get a behind-the-scenes look at the latest stories from CNN Chief Medical Correspondent, Dr. Sanjay Gupta, Senior Medical Correspondent Elizabeth Cohen and the CNN Medical Unit producers. They'll share news and views on health and medical trends - info that will help you take better care of yourself and the people you love.

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