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June 28th, 2011
04:26 PM ET

Dangerous drop side cribs no longer for sale

Cribs are supposed to be the safest place in the house for a parent to leave a baby unattended and any new parent shopping for a new crib should now feel a little more confident that their child will indeed be safe.  Beginning Tuesday, companies that manufacture or sell baby cribs in the United States have to comply with the latest safety standards set by the U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission (CPSC).

The standards will no longer allow the manufacture and sale of so-called drop side cribs, where one side or both sides of the crib can be lowered to provide easier access to a baby.

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June 28th, 2011
02:41 PM ET

Can an abuse victim 'fix' aversion to sex?

Every weekday, a CNNHealth expert doctor answers a viewer question. On Tuesdays, it's Dr. Charles Raison, an associate professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences at Emory University, and an expert in the mind-body connection for health.

Asked by Sharon from Alaska

I was abused as a child. Never intercourse, but I was threatened about it, and I had to watch my sister and this man. I was always called a prude by him. Anyway, I'm married and celibate. I do not enjoy sex nor do I have any interest in it. I am on Effexor and unsure how I feel about my husband. I do not know if this is a physical issue, mental or marrying the wrong man. Obviously this causes issues for my husband, but why should I suffer so he doesn't have to?
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June 28th, 2011
01:50 PM ET

Human Factor: How a triathlon saved my life

In the Human Factor, we profile survivors who have overcome the odds. Confronting a life obstacle - injury, illness or other hardship –- they tapped their inner strength and found resilience they didn’t know they possessed. This week Dr. Sanjay Gupta tells one man's story of overcoming major depression through exercise. In a previous post, Dr. Joseph C. Maroon talks about the importance of triathlons in his life.


Filed under: Human Factor

Engineers create human blood vessels from skin cells
June 28th, 2011
01:05 PM ET

Engineers create human blood vessels from skin cells

If you are on dialysis like approximately 400,000 other Americans, then your life could change for the better in the next couple of years thanks to some new biomedical engineering.

The technology, announced this week at an American Heart Association conference on emerging technology, enables engineers to grow sheets of human cells in a laboratory, and then synthesize them into tubes, mimicking human blood vessels. Alternatively, the human cells, which come from skin cells, can be made into threads and then woven into the form of blood vessels.

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Study confirms mammography reduces risk of breast cancer death
June 28th, 2011
12:07 PM ET

Study confirms mammography reduces risk of breast cancer death

A new study of more than 133,000 women confirms that regular mammography screenings reduce a woman's risk of dying from breast cancer.

The Swedish Two-County Trial study began in the late 1970s. In its first phase, researchers divided the study participants in to two groups: Women who were given regular mammograms, and women who were treated with "usual care," or treatment that did not include mammograms. That screening period lasted for seven years, after which the study's second phase began and the women were followed for an additional 29 years.

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About this blog

Get a behind-the-scenes look at the latest stories from CNN Chief Medical Correspondent, Dr. Sanjay Gupta, Senior Medical Correspondent Elizabeth Cohen and the CNN Medical Unit producers. They'll share news and views on health and medical trends - info that will help you take better care of yourself and the people you love.

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