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Five diabetes myths, busted
June 24th, 2011
09:47 AM ET

Five diabetes myths, busted

David Kendall, M.D., is the chief scientific and medical officer of the The American Diabetes Association. The group’s 71st Scientific Sessions begin Friday in San Diego, California, with presentations of the latest research, treatment recommendations and advances toward a cure for diabetes.

Each year diabetes accounts for more deaths than breast cancer and AIDS combined. While diabetes (both type 1 and type 2) is ever more manageable because of advances in medication, a better understanding of blood glucose monitoring and new technologies for delivering insulin, uncontrolled or undiagnosed diabetes still remains the leading cause of blindness in adults, kidney failure and amputation.

There are many myths about diabetes - myths that can do much harm. Many believe that diabetes is “just a touch of sugar,” or only something we develop in later life.

Although diabetes is manageable, the diabetes epidemic continues to grow; every 17 seconds someone is diagnosed with diabetes and at the current rate, one in three people in the U.S. will have diabetes by the year 2050.

Knowing the facts (and your own risk) can help all of us fight the misconceptions associated with this awful disease and ultimately stop diabetes.

So take a minute to learn the facts about diabetes. The more we know, the better equipped we are to detect, prevent and treat diabetes and its deadly complications.

1) Myth: Diabetes is really no big deal.

Fact: As I’ve already noted, diabetes causes more deaths a year than breast cancer and AIDS combined. The risk of heart problems is more than twice as high in people with diabetes and two out of three people with diabetes die from heart disease or stroke. Uncontrolled diabetes also leads to a host of other complications.

2) Myth: Eating too much sugar causes diabetes.

Fact: There is no one food or nutrient that causes diabetes. Type 1 diabetes (where all of the body’s insulin producing cells are destroyed) develops both because of genetics and from poorly understood environmental triggers that result in the onset of the disease. Type 2 diabetes is the result of both genetic and lifestyle factors.

There is no question that being overweight or obese increases your risk for developing type 2 diabetes. Weight gain occurs as a result of excess calories, and whether these calories come from a soda, breads, snacks or meat doesn’t generally matter. Because of genetics, some people gain weight more easily than others, but there is still an imbalance between calories eaten and those burned off.

Because of the complex relationship between genetics, the environment and lifestyle, it is incorrect to say that sugar causes diabetes.

3) Myth: If you are overweight or obese, you will eventually develop type 2 diabetes.

Fact: As we stated earlier, being overweight is a very important risk factor for developing type 2 diabetes. In fact, it is the most important modifiable risk factor. Other risk factors such as a family history of type 2 diabetes, ethnicity and age are things that you cannot change.

It is also true that most overweight people never develop type 2 diabetes, and as many as one-fourth of people with type 2 diabetes are at a normal weight or only moderately overweight. The thing to keep in mind is that if you have a family history of diabetes, you should do your best to be physically active and eat a healthy diet. If you are overweight, losing about 7% of your weight (14 pounds for a 200 pound person) can help delay or prevent diabetes.

4) Myth: If you have diabetes, you can’t eat any bread, potatoes, pasta, fruit, sugar or dessert.

Fact: This is a long-held misconception about the carbohydrates in food. With carbohydrates - and calories in general - it all comes back to portion sizes or how much you eat.

Starchy foods and fruit can be included in a meal plan for people with diabetes. The best tip is to have no more than 1/4 of your plate from starchy foods like whole grain breads, cereals, pasta, rice or starchy vegetables like potatoes, yams, peas and corn.

Fill half of your plate with low carbohydrate non-starchy vegetables like salad, broccoli, green beans or tomatoes. The last quarter of your plate is for fish, chicken, lean meats or meat substitutes. This helps to control the amount of carbohydrate that you eat while providing lots of fiber and healthy food choices.

5) Myth: People with diabetes can't eat sweets or chocolate.

Fact: Sweet foods (including most dessert items), if eaten in small portions, can be eaten by people with diabetes. There is no such thing as a “off limit” food; however, the key is substituting in a sweet treat into an otherwise healthy meal plan.

Everyone - diabetes or no diabetes - should avoid empty calories (those without real food value) and limit the total amount of calories they consume (and yes, most desserts are high in calories).

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Filed under: Diabetes

soundoff (74 Responses)
  1. D. Lane

    For an alternative viewpoint, check out Blood Sugar 101:

    http://www.phlaunt.com/diabetes/

    June 24, 2011 at 12:23 | Report abuse | Reply
    • Larry051967

      The Paleo diet took me off the needle. It took almost 6 months but I'm off and have never looked back. A part of all this is the modern diet, process foods, chemicals and especially the different forms of corn sweeteners that show up unannounced in just about any processed or manufactured food. If you apply modern scientific principals to a classification of corn sweeteners that class would be a poison, something that in a small dose causes a big reaction.

      June 24, 2011 at 13:39 | Report abuse |
    • Boca

      Though overall an OK article, some statements in this article are bunk. Carbs, especially bad ones cause diabetes type II. I agree with Larry above and have personally experienced it: A paleo diet, moderate exercise and good sleep will eliminate the need to take medications for diabetes. Your blood sugar will normalize. But note that if you go back to eating carbs, not exercising and not sleeping properly, your diabetes will return. (Also: a paleo (high fate/protein) diet has it's own issues, for instance, make sure to fast regularly to minimize the risk of gout.

      June 25, 2011 at 03:32 | Report abuse |
    • Laura

      I agree with D Lane. Blood Sugar 101 is the single most helpful website I've every found. She explains quite well the history of how the AMA came to the sugar levels they use to diagnose "diabetic". Specifically, in the days before they could treatw well, they did not want people to be diagnosed too early because they would be dropped by insurance......

      I'm not diabetic, but it runs in the family, and so I watch this closely. And yes, I feel much better physically when I don't eat more than a minuscule amount of sweets or refined carbs. Anyone who thinks that sugar doesn't cause diabetes should try a week without, and see how much better they feel. Sugar causes spikes, and spikes cause type 2....

      June 25, 2011 at 22:17 | Report abuse |
  2. Arthur Jacobs

    Contact Evans Craig
    FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
    Cell Phone: 202-710-2995
    email: evans@evanscraig.com

    http://www.LongestWalk2011.com/

    THE LONGEST WALK 3 (REVERSING DIABETES 2011) REACHES WASHINGTON D.C. ON JULY 8

    Washington DC will host the “Longest Walk 3” (Reversing Diabetes 2011) on July 8th, a 5000 mile walk/run relay across America to raise awareness of diabetes among Native Americans. The walkers left La Jolla (San Diego), Ca & Portland, Oregon on Feb., 14 and walked and ran across the U.S.A. planning to arrive in Washington, DC on July 8, 2011.

    The walk across America is the brain-child of Dennis Banks, co-founder of the American Indian Movement. He was diagnosed in early 2009 with diabetes, and made drastic changes to his diet and exercise regime. These changes have helped him to reverse his diabetes and become an advocate for prevention and lifestyle management for diabetes.

    Along the way the walkers have conducted forums on diabetes including juice fasts, exercising, walking, healthy diets and gardening at local tribal communities. They have visited over 40 American Indian reservations throughout the journey. The walk has provided the opportunity to collect diabetic concerns and stories from across America and to develop this information into a personal in-depth perspective from the Native view.

    In the Washington DC area, there will be many events. Diabetes Summit/Talks are scheduled for July 5-7, at the Best Western Hotel & Conference Center in Leesburg, VA, near Dulles Int’l Airport. When the Northern & Southern Route Walkers arrive in Washington DC on July 8, they will walk across the Memorial Bridge into the National Mall to the Washington Monument, where there will be an Opening (Sunrise) Ceremony and then walk to Lafayette Park (White House) for a Healing ceremony, as well as Diabetes Talks & Testimonies back at the Nat’ Mall on Friday afternoon. On the 9th and 10th the LW3 Walkers will participate in the Baltimore Powwow.

    For more information see:

    http://www.LongestWalk2011.com/about

    http://www.LongestWalk2011.com/2011/03/24/planned-washinton-dc-events-july-6-10-2011/

    http://www.LongestWalk2011.com//wp-content/uploads/2011/03/longestwalk3_summit.pdf

    ###

    June 24, 2011 at 12:33 | Report abuse | Reply
  3. pookie

    Fact. A diabetic can bread, potatoes, pasta etc. I just makes their blood sugar go through the roof which will over time cause irreparable harm to their body. 1 gram of carbohydrate raises my blood glucose by 5mm/dL. A small serving of potatoes takes me from 100->200. Why is this a good idea? Why recommend this? Is the American Diabetes Association and advocate for people with diabetes or diabetes itself?
    Potatoes are not vegetables. Bread is cake. This is crappy advice.

    June 24, 2011 at 13:02 | Report abuse | Reply
    • Les

      I agree. The always say diabetics can eat sugar or these things in moderation. However, what they don't tell you is the spikes you get eating this way, ESPECIALLY if you are not using insulin. This is why there are so many complications from diabetes, this kind of misinformation!

      June 24, 2011 at 14:34 | Report abuse |
    • Type 1 is Manageable

      Sounds like you're Type 2 and aren't covering your carbs with insulin. My son is Type 1 and eats anything and everything within moderation, just as he would if he didn't have Type 1. We calculate his carb intake, measure his blood sugar then give an appropriate amount of insulin. Whether it's bread, ice cream, bananas or green beans, a carb's a carb.

      June 24, 2011 at 23:21 | Report abuse |
    • JC

      If you have diabetes, you should be taking insulin, no matter what. If you aren't you are doing damage to your body. Don't be afraid of 'the needle'. My daughter was giving herself shots at age 6 (Type 1). It's ridiculous to read about ADULTS afraid to take shots. When you pair your carbs to the proper amount of insulin, you CAN eat these foods, in moderation. My daughter's a1c is 6.8 and she's had diabetes for 12 years. She eats candy, potatoes, corn, etc. Not every day but IN MODERATION. She's never been deprived of anything except for sugared drinks like Kool-Aid and regular pop.

      June 25, 2011 at 03:10 | Report abuse |
    • Boca

      Little known fact: The main financial supporters of the ADA are soft drink companies. (Feel free to look it up!)

      June 25, 2011 at 04:00 | Report abuse |
    • Laura

      well put, pookie.

      June 25, 2011 at 22:20 | Report abuse |
    • James

      Completely agree – this information is downright DANGEROUS, certainly not helpful...

      I've also been "Paleo" for about 9 months now and have gone from pre-diabetic 262 lbs to perfect blood glucose levels and 185... IN 9 MONTHS!!! I've never felt better and it's all thanks to keeping insulin levels as low as possible. Read The Paleo Diet or The Primal Blueprint and you'll see blood glucose come down and your life improve quickly – it certainly has for me!!!

      June 26, 2011 at 13:26 | Report abuse |
    • ABS

      I agree. I think Dr. David Kendall is just trying to keep people on insulin and pharmaceutical drugs rather that curing it. The biggest myth put forward by the drug companies and medical doctors about diseases like diabetes and hypertension is that there are chronic and not reversible. How can you take those pills and insulin shots for the rest of your live when the side effects are more harmful that the disease itself. I agree that you should rely on those medicines if your numbers are out of control but in the long run you should respect your body and be careful with what you do with it or else you don't deserve to be healthy.

      October 26, 2014 at 00:40 | Report abuse |
  4. DPS Health

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    June 24, 2011 at 14:11 | Report abuse | Reply
  5. Jill

    Typical rubbish advice from the medical profession there. If you're diabetic, you DO need to cut your carbs right down, and any doctor who tells you otherwise is negligent frankly. 1/4 of a plate dedicated to grains is way too much, I would cut them right down, if you have them at all – they're not what we evolved to eat.

    June 24, 2011 at 14:28 | Report abuse | Reply
    • Type 1 is Manageable

      Oh, OK JIll. I'll just ignore my son's pediatric endcrinologist and instead I'll listen to quacks on a chatboard. The Ivy-league educated doctor has 30+ years specializing in the field of diabetes but according to you, his knowledge is mere rubbish.

      June 24, 2011 at 23:24 | Report abuse |
    • Boca

      Actually, Jill is quite correct and your so-called Ivy-educated doctor is a complete idiot for giving you rubbish advice.

      June 25, 2011 at 04:05 | Report abuse |
    • Neal

      I side with Jill. She is correct and the Ivy League folks are selling us misinformation to make themselves look good and make a lot of money. Carbs are unnecessary. They can't cure us. The doctor is in folks and he is in us. If the doctors knew what they were doing and their treatments worked then why are we so sick? Good Luck.

      June 25, 2011 at 09:37 | Report abuse |
    • Morgan

      I will have to agree with Jill as well. My husband is type 1 and is on insulin. That said he keeps his blood sugar under control ONLY because he eats VERY little carbs. He does eat mashed potatoes with his meals, but they are measured out with a measuring cup so he knows exactly how many carbs to account for. We have found that if he has more, even when he counts for it, it will drive his blood sugar through the roof. He follows the rule that OUR doctor gave him, which is no more than 60 carbs per meal.

      June 25, 2011 at 13:21 | Report abuse |
    • ABS

      I'm with Jill on this one. Corporations that are selling tainted food which result in all these lifestyle diseases are the ones that sponsor researches at Ivy Leagues.

      October 26, 2014 at 00:47 | Report abuse |
  6. Kelly

    Really?! This article is taken directly from diabetes research medical professionals. Your diabetes can be managed and can affect you in a variety of different ways however, these results are medically correct and, in general, absolutely correct. If your case is different, take it up with your medical proffesional. Do not claim on a public website that hundreds of researchers are wrong.

    June 24, 2011 at 15:03 | Report abuse | Reply
    • Neal

      Hi Kelly. If the doctors and medical establishment knew what they were doing how is it that we are getting sicker as a nation? How come the wise doctors can"t "cure" diabetes? Because they can't with their drugs and tests. Only we can cure it and it's the junk food we are eating that causes it and natural food is what cures us. Eat what nature provides and bagged, canned and otherwise packaged food is not natural. Eat plenty of fat in coconut oil, grass fed butter and port lard. Moderate animal protein and low carbohydrates. Good Luck.

      June 25, 2011 at 09:31 | Report abuse |
  7. Ken

    All very good points and important for folks to know and understand. I have been a Type 1 diabetic for almost 35 years and I have seen many things said and tried over those years. I am still in good health so I believe I understand a bit on the topic.

    I would like to add a few comments to any interested in the topic.
    1) Type 1 diabetis and Type 2 diabetis are dramatically different so it would be great if the medical community would change the name of one of them so they are not so easily confused. This is a life threatening problem and I have witnessed serious medical flaws because the medical person thinks it's one type which may not be the right type.
    2) A Type 1 prevention solution should be possible today. I am disappointed in the medical research on this because the solution should be within our understanding today.
    3) The increasing trend on Type 2 diabetis is also a direct result of the threshold #'s going down so there are many people being counted in the Type 2 diabetis # that are barely outside of normal and may not really have Type 2 diabetis. Not sure if this is because of the doctors, researchers or drug companies but ihas gotten out of hand.
    4) Carbs are everything for glucose blood control. It is just that simple. Calorie values are misleading and don't match to glucose so eat by carbs not calories. Exercise helps use the glucose and keeps ones metabolism up higher so exercise is good too.

    June 24, 2011 at 15:16 | Report abuse | Reply
    • Roxanne

      I could not agree with you more Ken. Most people don't begin to know the difference between type 1 and type 2.

      June 24, 2011 at 18:03 | Report abuse |
    • Morgan

      This is very correct, many people do not understand the differences. I am type 2 my husband is type 1. I can eat things that would be detrimental to him. He is on a VERY strict diet. If you have ever experienced DKA you know ti's nothing to mess around with. He was in ICU for over a week as they worked to just get him brought back to us. He was completely out of it and would just sit there dazed. This is how we found out he was a type 1 diabetic several years ago. Before that we had no idea... he had never been tested. Though looking back there HAD been signs before. He now suffers from terrible neuropathy and it only gets worst if his blood sugar stays too high for too long. He's on the pump which has made his life a little easier but he is so careful in what he eats. He tried at first to follow the, you can eat in moderation, it didn't work. He knows how to keep his blood sugar down now..what work..and what doesn't.

      June 25, 2011 at 13:28 | Report abuse |
  8. Madison

    This is from the BBC today. Type II Diabetes Can Be Reversed!

    http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/health-13887909

    June 24, 2011 at 17:14 | Report abuse | Reply
    • Type 1 is Manageable

      That's old news. Type 2, as mentioned in this article, is caused by genetic factors and lifestyle–sedentary and overweight folks are more likely to develope Type 2 diabetes. It generally CAN be reversed by exercise and diet changes. Type 2 affects about 90% of Americans. Type 1, however, can NOT be reversed and that seems to be very confusing for people to understand.

      June 24, 2011 at 23:27 | Report abuse |
  9. Gary Noreen

    More ADA malpractice.

    THERE IS NO ESSENTIAL CARBOHYDRATE. YOU NEED 0!

    Why eat something that is just going to make things worse if you are a diabetic? Cut carbs as much as possible.

    Sure, if you want to help the drug companies paying ADA, eat lots of carbs and take lots of drugs to counteract their effects. However, be mindful of the complications of the resultant hyperinsulinemia.

    June 24, 2011 at 20:09 | Report abuse | Reply
    • TF

      Most people eat far too many carbs, and the "food pyramid" encouraged it, as did the notion that if you just eat tons of "Low Fat" foods you'll never get fat – so stock up on all the carbs, because they supposedly burn right off. Yeah, right – with obesity and diabetes going through the roof, they're still telling people that even diabetics can make up to 1/4 of their food intake carbs and be okay. Sheesh.

      June 24, 2011 at 20:39 | Report abuse |
    • jeremiah

      carbs are necessary in food to produce energy that your body needs in a natural enviornment, if you have diabetes type one or 2 it is your responsiblity to manage your carb level to your activity level but you definately need carbs, just how much for your activity level is the question???...

      food is food it isn't evil, insulin is missing from my body i must replace it, and in the process figure out how my body did it naturally and best mimic that with my own insulin i bought from some guy off the corner....lol.

      i am t1.

      you must figure the problems out for oneself these are guidleines to start by everyone has their own paths they must follow to enjoy the type of lifestyle they want with this disease.

      June 24, 2011 at 21:32 | Report abuse |
    • Type 1 is Manageable

      Gary, you're wrong. We ALL need carbs for energy. Period. You may mean we don't need processed sugar and that's true but we ALL need carbs. Think about it. Healthy, natural foods like bananas, apples, oranges, green beans all contain carbohydrates. You're saying we shouldn't eat those things? How foolish. Now if you want to be more specific and say we don't need white flour, white rice, sugar cereals, donuts, etc., then you're correct.

      June 24, 2011 at 23:32 | Report abuse |
    • Neal

      Hi Jeremiah. I don't believe that carbs are required for excellent health. That is just one of the many untruths. I, many days eats no carbs and on all days I eat good quality fats, coconut oil, butter and pork lard and have excellent health. Because the food I eat nourish me I don't have to eat lots of food. Have you noticed we have many sick people in this country and we eat al ot of processed foods? If we eat food as nature intended we get healthy. Good Luck.

      June 25, 2011 at 09:23 | Report abuse |
    • Mary

      Gary is actually right on. There is no reason for a diabetic to eat those bananas and other fruit, except to die faster. Look at all the other people posting who are managing their Type 2 through diet and exercise. The problem is, if you get your numbers in line through a Very Low Carb diet instead of with drugs, suddenly you "don't have diabetes" and it doesn't count as a cure. But if I ate a banana, I sure could show you a "diabetic" blood sugar number!

      June 25, 2011 at 16:50 | Report abuse |
    • riprap

      Gary is right, there is no body function that relies on carbs. NO CARBS ARE NEEDED IN HUMAN METABOLISM.

      June 26, 2011 at 13:40 | Report abuse |
    • ABS

      Exactly. Carbohydrates just breaks down into glucose faster than Protein and Fat. Other than that there is not noticeable use of carbohydrate to our body. Human kind has evolved for over 2.5 million years without most carbohydrates like grains and it was only during the last 10 thousand years that we have started consuming them with the advent of farming and agriculture. Our body still can't process grains properly.

      October 26, 2014 at 00:56 | Report abuse |
  10. Pete

    What if you have the opposite problem? I am obese but have a problem with low blood sugar. If I eat a low carb diet I have panic attacks. I was down in the ER 2 weeks ago with a panic attack. I had some rice and a sugar soda right before I went in to cope with it. The doctors didn't believe me until they got the results of the blood work back. They thought before that it was diabetes but it wasn't. I need help.

    June 24, 2011 at 22:10 | Report abuse | Reply
    • Neal

      Hi Pete. When we change our foods to those that nourish we in fact have symptoms that make us fearful. Those symptoms are our bodies cleaning up a long abuse of junk foods. It's healing in action. In your case you went to the hospital and they treated you and you ate more poor quality foods and they tasted good. Can you see the addiction in that? Make sure you are eating high quality fats like coconut oil and grass fed butter and eat less and less junk as your body adjusts. Slowly eliminate processed foods and add more and more real food. BTW, pizza, pasta, chips, prezels, donuts, fruit juices and cereals are not real foods. Good Luck.

      June 25, 2011 at 09:16 | Report abuse |
    • Breezy

      Hi Pete, what were the bloodwork results? 98 to 120 is a normal range for bloodsugar. Anything above 120 is considered to high and anything below 98 is considered to low. Hypoglycemia is different from Hyperglycemia, Hypo for low and hyper for high. A hypoglycemic (low blood sugar) should treat their diet just as a Hyperglycemic (high blood sugar) has to. Your pancreas over produces insulin, if your bloodsugar rises, it produces more insulin causing a crash cycle. If you introduce refined sugar into your diet to counter the low sugar you produce even more insulin and another crash. Keep fruits, real fruit snacks and fruit juices handy. Speak with a real nutritionist not a doctor to find out more about the diet you need to be on,

      June 25, 2011 at 11:28 | Report abuse |
    • Mary

      These low blood sugar events are a reaction to eating that. Three hours or so after eating that, it is going to happen again. And again and again and again. I passed out several times before I escaped that insanity. A Very Low Carb diet will get you off the rollar coaster and flatten out your blood sugar (which actually means your fasting blood sugar will come UP to meet the straight line).

      June 25, 2011 at 16:52 | Report abuse |
    • Laura

      Pete, listen to Mary.
      If you slowly reduce your carbs, you will lose weight AND bring your blood sugar up to normal. Basically, your body is over-compensating right now, putting out too much insulin. You are pre-diabetic, and if you don't stop eating sugar, you will become diabetic soon. Google Blood Sugar 101. The blogger explains this is detail, and gives you tips on how to take control. Good luck!

      June 25, 2011 at 22:30 | Report abuse |
    • Pete

      Going on a low carb diet is not worth spending the night in the ER or another time having the campus nurse treat me for hypoglycemia while the campus cop didn't want me to drive. When I have these hypoglycemia attacks I can't walk or concentrate on anything. From what I have read hypoglycemia is just as dangerous as diabetes. One doctor I talked to theorizes it could be the drug I am on for an unrelated illness. I have had other doctors agree but are not willing to take me off the drug. They just tell me to carry a soda or candy bar in case of an emergency and eat small meals every few hours.

      June 27, 2011 at 00:00 | Report abuse |
  11. Phil

    I am so tired of people tell me what NOT to eat instead of telling me what to eat. This has sugar, that has sugar! Processed foods are everywhere and high fructose instead of pure cane sugar makes things much worse. It's a lifestyle problem which is hard to fight if you live in particular country. This disease is made more confusing by the piles of MISinformation

    June 24, 2011 at 22:13 | Report abuse | Reply
    • Neal

      Phil, there is much information out there. What to eat? Eat high quality fat (coconut oil, grass fed butter and pork lard). Eat moderate animal protein and free range eggs and low carbohydrate foods and no processed foods. It is a challenge at first and depending on age and condition your could start to see results in a few weeks. This can give you the push we need to continue. Good Luck.

      June 25, 2011 at 09:09 | Report abuse |
    • ABS

      The general rule of thumb is eat directly from the God's pantry and avoid everything that has been adulterated by man.

      October 26, 2014 at 01:03 | Report abuse |
  12. angelalyons26

    I love the free sample site "123 Samples" search online to find their official website, that's where i get most of my samples from!!! yay i love free stuff.

    June 25, 2011 at 05:47 | Report abuse | Reply
  13. Anne

    I have been a diabetic for 33 yrs. Because of all the misinformation I received along the way my life was miserable until about 10 yrs. ago when I went to a diabetic center. I am no angel but I try to stick to my diet fatthfully. People that have diabetes need to understand that primary doctors don't know everythng about diabetes. The kind of doctor they need is a endrocrinologists. Carbs play a good part in my life and I eat plenty of them, like 60 carbs at each meal. Low fat, low sodium and whole grains should be used. When I found out I was a diabetic I was not overweight, so it is not always true that diabetics are fat.

    June 25, 2011 at 06:45 | Report abuse | Reply
  14. Neal

    Hi Folks. I have hope that we are gaining more knowledge about how the foods we eat affect our health. I see many posts about Paleo eating that have changed the health of folks for the better. Add me to the list. Though I did not have diabetes I had many other issues that have gone away or are in decline because I eat lots of good fats and moderate protein and low carbs and no processed foods. It can be challenge at first because we have become addicted bad food and when you give it up there is withdrawl. Pain, insomnia, anxiety and body odor are a few and there could be more. It is our body cleaning up what could be decades of bad food. Our good health does not return overnight but it will return. PS I avoid all grains because of the gluten and mycotoxins in them that are difficult to digest or prevent other nutrients (like minerals) from being digested. Good luck folks and for those interested, it can be done.

    June 25, 2011 at 09:04 | Report abuse | Reply
  15. ToTheIdiots

    My daughter has type 1 diabetes. She has it because her immune system attacked her pancreas and "killed" it. Her pancreas does not work anymore. I hate morons like the ones on this board who claim that if she eats their diet her pancreas will magically spring back to life. It wont.
    And BTW... ALL foods, even lettuce, have some amount of carbs in them. Some only have trace amounts (like lettuce) but if you eat enough of them it still adds up.
    And I don't know who your ancestors were but mine evolved to eat fruits, vegetables, and grains... ALL of which have carbs to fuel our bodies.

    June 25, 2011 at 10:03 | Report abuse | Reply
    • Mary

      Actually, your ancestors, just like mine, only started eating grain when they were starving during "the long winter" and the majority of their grains were fermented. And I think most of the people posting here *do* get the difference between Type I and Type II, but they are also aware that the same diet can manage blood sugar for both. There are plenty of Type I's who have good control using VLC.

      June 25, 2011 at 16:56 | Report abuse |
  16. annie

    Being a Type 1 diabetic for 35 yrs., I agree with Ken. Stop lumping all diabetics together..Type 1 is totally different from Type 2. Years ago we learned to eat a healthy diet that contains no sugar and eat small portions of protein, fats, starch and vegs. I have stayed the same weigth all these years. Now, I notice Type 1 young people are told they can eat anything to just adjust their insulin and altho' I don't agree, as long as it helps them cope with the disease. I have several friends who are Type 2 and they are overweight and eat anything and everything because they don't SEE the damage they are doing. I think we need much more education on the subject before we all bankrupt the medical system. Like Ken states please come up with a different name for Type 1's as we are the small (10%) portion of the problem.

    June 25, 2011 at 11:11 | Report abuse | Reply
  17. Jimmy

    Why do they keep lowering the numbers to classify more and more people as type 2 diabetics?It use to be if your number was below 200 you were ok. My wife's is around 102 and they say she is type 2 diabetic. Could there be a connection between how many people you classify and the number of doctor visits required and the amount of prescription medicine that has to be purchased?

    June 25, 2011 at 11:17 | Report abuse | Reply
    • Mary

      While it is true that most people progress no matter what warning they are given, people who are warned at a blood sugar of 90 (pre-diabetic or early diabetes) have a good opportunity to turn their life around and never spend a dollar on drugs. People who are caught later have less of an opportunity to save their own skins. Good luck to your wife!

      June 25, 2011 at 16:58 | Report abuse |
    • Laura

      Blood Sugar 101 explains this in detail.
      Basically, a level of 200 is so high that the patient already has irreversible nerve damage. 100 (or is it 110?) is a warning, but prior to the onset of nerve damage.
      In the days before they could treat somewhat well, the ADA didn't want people diagnosed too early, because they would be dropped from insurance.

      June 25, 2011 at 22:40 | Report abuse |
  18. nancy

    my husband has been a type 2 for about 12 years. He manages quite well and eats a well balanced diet of everything. NUT in MODERATION. He is also a Vietnam era Veteran who served in Southeast Asia during one of our previously NON declared (50,000+) dead wars. The Deparment of Defense admites and show that various types of Dixoins were sprayed in other locals OTHER than only in Vietnam but the VA does not recognize the Possible damage that this has caused to a lot of Veterans. So there is a lot of issues to be considered when discussing/causing Diabetes.

    June 25, 2011 at 14:33 | Report abuse | Reply
  19. CHD

    Check out this recent NEWS. Click on Link ort cut and past on browser. Why CNN or anybody in USA reporting this news?

    http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/health-13887909

    June 26, 2011 at 09:06 | Report abuse | Reply
  20. Phil

    By MISinformation I mean saying that all diabetics are obese. I am thin and I'm on insulin. Doctors say there is no cure but it is "reversible". What the heck do they mean reversible?

    June 26, 2011 at 10:29 | Report abuse | Reply
  21. Brittney

    I wish this article had a little more information for those diagnosed with Type 2 who do not lead a sedentary lifestyle and ate very well. I was diagnosed with Type 2 diabetes and I followed a very healthy diet before the diagnosis (and still do), and I do cardiovascular exercise daily. I am not obese or even overweight, but actually on the low end of "normal weight range." My sugar still spikes when I do not eat carbohydrates and sugar and this article does not seem to address issues that are useful to me.

    June 26, 2011 at 10:37 | Report abuse | Reply
    • Anne

      I responded to this article earlier, but thought I would respond to Brittney. The best thing to do is eat the same total of carbs at each meal. And make sure you eat at the same time every day. You should eat your meals about 4 hours apart. On my diet which is equals 1500 calories a day. I eat 60 carbs at breakfast, 60 at lunch, 60 at dinner and a bedtime snack of 30 carbs. Hope this will give you some idea on how you should eat. Also according to my lab sheet normal blood sugars should be between 60 to 116 MG/DL. So if your doctor says your blood sugar is too high at 110, ask him what it's based on. He may not be the professional you need for diabetes. You need an Endocrinologist, primary care doctors don't know that much about diabetes.

      June 26, 2011 at 18:51 | Report abuse |
  22. Hunter

    Typical rubbish advice on diabetes here. "Myths" #2, #4, & #5 are just full of stupid.

    June 26, 2011 at 15:32 | Report abuse | Reply
  23. Elise

    It's hard to cure diabetes completely, while Maha Meditation taught by Holy Ziguang Shang Shi certainly provides the best way to treat this tough chronic disease. I really hope more people could be saved. Please help to tell those who are in need.

    June 26, 2011 at 20:42 | Report abuse | Reply
  24. Vichara

    Bravo to Elise for mentioning meditation, a healing art that goes to the roots of stress. I started with zen, then tibetan and India. Close to 200 lbs, now about 150. Odd no one uses key word 'glycemic' here. Over 5 years ago Jean Carper came out with a bestseller called The Glucose Revolution which explained clearly how the body uses the different sugars, carbs etc and most importantly the different carb values. Stretching the memory, I believe it was also pointed out that 'some' carb is necessary so as to not lose muscle. Unfortunately, many drs think they already know & therefore are unable to learn. And not just about diabetes. Ignorance iis our #1 killer, followed closely by stress. Wow these responses are amazing.

    June 26, 2011 at 23:13 | Report abuse | Reply
  25. Patrick

    Well, the article states the obvious. Are there really people out there who are dumb enough to believe that sugar causes diabetes? I guess Americans will believe anything, which explains why there are so many desperate, yet lazy people who buy into things like the Atkins or Paleo diet. There's a sucker born every minute.

    June 27, 2011 at 20:34 | Report abuse | Reply
  26. Dan

    I have read many of the comments about diets/carbs/low fat etc. and found many of them to be people saying what they believe. But as with all beliefs I hope they don't block out facts that don't match the belief. I have been a type 1 diabetic for 49 years and my one belief is that the most important thing for a diabetic is excersize. Yes diet is important and a great deal of time and effort should be spent on it, but I believe I would not be alive and health today unless I was active for the last half century.

    June 28, 2011 at 14:43 | Report abuse | Reply
  27. Derek

    Clearly, the guy working for the Diabetes Association doesn't have diabetes. As a type II diabetic, I laughed when I read #5.

    June 30, 2011 at 13:21 | Report abuse | Reply
  28. dietplaningtips

    Your diet plan tips for diabetics are vey useful, Thanks for sharing.

    February 2, 2013 at 05:37 | Report abuse | Reply
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  30. Bd

    David, I expected far more from you in this article. All grains and breads should be eliminated from any diabetics diet. Utilize protein and fat to lessen the need to chase blood sugars. Typical old diabetes teaching. Never drink milk in any form.

    August 30, 2013 at 21:59 | Report abuse | Reply
  31. mitfreude

    It is just stunning the sort of scientifically illiterate pop nonsense that comes from doctors when it comes to diet. These guys had one poorly designed course 15 years ago, never tried to think it through and present themselves as experts giving advice to people about life and death issues. Diabetes is extremely serious and it's unambiguously caused by eating carbohydrates especially sugar. Populations that don't consume large amounts of sugar and starches simply don't present with diabetes.

    September 7, 2013 at 22:35 | Report abuse | Reply
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  34. Lily

    I'm so glad I read this article–I fully believed myth #2. I know too much sugar consumption is bad, but now I can stop stressing about getting diabetes solely from that. Thanks for posting!

    Lily | http://groundgreentea.com

    May 29, 2014 at 10:49 | Report abuse | Reply
  35. TJW

    Saying you can eat foods high in simple carbs is just un-true. Yes, you can eat VERY SMALL amounts, but the typical pasta dinner or three slices of pizza are out of the question. I had to practically eliminate simple carbs to maintain my glucose level (type 2).

    June 6, 2014 at 23:16 | Report abuse | Reply
  36. ddcmusc

    Reblogged this on Clinic Notes.

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