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May 31st, 2011
04:24 PM ET

6 tips for minimizing cell phone radiation

On Tuesday, scientists at the World Health Organization announced that the agency will now list mobile phone use in the same "carcinogenic hazard" category as lead, engine exhaust and chloroform.

There haven't been enough long-term studies to make a clear conclusion if radiation from cell phones is safe, but there was enough data to persuade the WHO of a possible connection.

Cell phones use non-ionizing radiation, which doesn’t damage DNA the way ionizing radiation does.  The cell phone radiation operates more like very low power microwaves, but nobody really likes to think of leaning their face on a low-powered microwave.

If the WHO’s labeling of cell phone use as "possibly carcinogenic to humans" has gotten you alarmed, here are some quick basic tips to limit your exposure.

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May 31st, 2011
01:34 PM ET

Human Factor: Indy car racing with diabetes

In the Human Factor we profile people who have overcome the odds against them. Confronting a life obstacle – injury, illness or other hardship –- they tapped their inner strength and found resilience they didn’t know they possessed.   On Sunday, J.R. Hildebrand would have been the 9th rookie to win the Indianapolis 500, had he not crashed in the final turn of the race. He was passing another rookie, Charlie Kimball, at the time. Kimball ended up in 13th place but that's not the end of  his story.  This week , Kimball shares how his life has changed since he was diagnosed with diabetes.   Here is his story in his own words.

I have the greatest job in the world!

While I am definitely pumped to get up each morning and go to the “office” and do what I do – mainly driving a race car – there is another side of my job that brings me great joy and that is having the honor of meeting members of the global diabetes community each time I go to work.

The diabetes community is a group of men, women and children who I didn’t even know existed before I was diagnosed with Type 1 diabetes in 2007.  There are 24 million of us in the U.S. alone and the connection among people living with diabetes is stronger than I think anyone realizes.

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Would you send an STD e-card?
May 31st, 2011
07:33 AM ET

Would you send an STD e-card?

E-cards are last-minute lifesavers when you’ve forgotten to send a happy birthday card.  But they’re not the first thing you think of when you learn you have a sexually transmitted disease.

But since 2004, a free Web site, inSpot.org has allowed users to anonymously notify their partners to get tested for STDs such as HIV, gonorrhea, chlamydia and syphilis.  The online program allows users to send an e-card anonymously, specifying the STD.

The tool exists, but do people use the STD e-cards?

Well, that depends.
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About this blog

Get a behind-the-scenes look at the latest stories from CNN Chief Medical Correspondent, Dr. Sanjay Gupta, Senior Medical Correspondent Elizabeth Cohen and the CNN Medical Unit producers. They'll share news and views on health and medical trends - info that will help you take better care of yourself and the people you love.

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