home
RSS
May 27th, 2011
06:04 PM ET

May 27th, 2011
09:00 AM ET

How much protein should I take post-workout?

Every weekday, a CNNHealth expert doctor answers a viewer question. On Friday, it's Dr. Melina Jampolis, a physician nutrition specialist.

Asked by Jason from Afghanistan

I am currently deployed to Afghanistan. I am rigorously training in the gym at night. Pre-workout, I am taking NaNO Vapor and then as a post-workout boost I'm taking the Muscle Tech's Nitro-Tech. How much protein should I be taking for my post-workout? That's all ma'am. FULL POST


What the Yuck: Hot yoga or hot mess?
May 27th, 2011
07:39 AM ET

What the Yuck: Hot yoga or hot mess?

Too embarrassed to ask your doctor about sex, body quirks, or the latest celeb health fad? In a regular feature and a new book, "What the Yuck?!," Health magazine medical editor Dr. Roshini Raj tackles your most personal and provocative questions. Send 'em to Dr. Raj at whattheyuck@health.com.

Q: My friend keeps trying to drag me to her hot yoga class, but could it be hazardous?

It could be. Bikram yoga, also known as hot yoga, takes place in a room that is 100 to 105 degrees with 40 percent humidity. Exercising in such a warm room can cause dehydration or heat stroke, so be sure to drink plenty of water (at least 16 ounces) before and during hot yoga.
FULL POST


Warning signs of pregnancy-related diabetes
May 27th, 2011
12:01 AM ET

Warning signs of pregnancy-related diabetes

Diabetes stemming from pregnancy can cause a host of problems for baby and mother alike, including birth complications and a higher risk of developing the more serious type 2 diabetes later in life.

In a new study, researchers say they've identified a series of routine health measures that can help doctors predict years in advance which women will develop pregnancy-related diabetes, paving the way for lifestyle changes and other early prevention efforts.

Obesity, elevated blood sugar, and high blood pressure were all linked to a higher risk of developing pregnancy-related diabetes, also known as gestational diabetes. The odds were nearly three times higher among overweight and obese women as among those of normal weight, the study found, and the odds were roughly 2.5 times higher among those with slightly elevated blood sugar.
FULL POST

Post by:
Filed under: Diabetes • Health.com

Advertisement
About this blog

Get a behind-the-scenes look at the latest stories from CNN Chief Medical Correspondent, Dr. Sanjay Gupta, Senior Medical Correspondent Elizabeth Cohen and the CNN Medical Unit producers. They'll share news and views on health and medical trends - info that will help you take better care of yourself and the people you love.

Advertisement
Advertisement